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      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cattle; Cells, Cultured; Cystic Fibrosis; Flavoproteins; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Immunity, Innate; Immunity, Mucosal; Lactoperoxidase; Lung Diseases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Rats; Reactive Oxygen Species; Respiratory Mucosa; RNA, Small Interfering; Staphylococcus aureus; Thiocyanates; Trachea; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        RATIONALE The respiratory tract is constantly exposed to airborne microorganisms. Nevertheless, normal airways remain sterile without recruiting phagocytes. This innate immune activity has been attributed to mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial polypeptides of airway surface liquid. Defective airway immunity characterizes cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a chloride channel. The pathophysiology of defective immunity in CF remains to be elucidated. OBJECTIVE We investigated the ability of non-CF and CF airway epithelia to kill bacteria through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). METHODS ROS production and ROS-mediated bactericidal activity were determined on the apical surfaces of human and rat airway epithelia and on cow tracheal explants. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Dual oxidase enzyme of airway epithelial cells generated sufficient H(2)O(2) to support production of bactericidal hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the presence of airway surface liquid components lactoperoxidase and thiocyanate (SCN(-)). This OSCN(-) formation eliminated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway mucosal surfaces, whereas it was nontoxic to the host. In contrast to normal epithelia, CF epithelia failed to secrete SCN(-), thereby rendering the oxidative antimicrobial system inactive. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate a novel innate defense mechanism of airways that kills bacteria via ROS and suggest a new cellular and molecular basis for defective airway immunity in CF.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17082494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9988
      1. Author :
        Burkatovskaya, Marina; Tegos, George P; Swietlik, Emilia; Demidova, Tatiana N; P Castano, Ana; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetates; Alginates; Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bandages; Bioware; Chitosan; Glucuronic Acid; Hexuronic Acids; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Occlusive Dressings; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Silver Sulfadiazine; Staphylococcus aureus; Wound Healing; Wound Infection; Xen8.1, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        HemCon bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation used as a hemostatic control dressing, and its chemical structure suggests that it should also be antimicrobial. We tested its ability to rapidly kill bacteria in vitro and in mouse models of infected wounds. We used the Gram-negative species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis and the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus that had all been stably transduced with the entire bacterial lux operon to allow in vivo bioluminescence imaging. An excisional wound in Balb/c mice was inoculated with 50-250 million cells followed after 30 min by application of HemCon bandage, alginate sponge bandage, silver sulfadiazine cream or no treatment. HemCon was more adhesive to the wound and conformed well to the injury compared to alginate. Animal survival was followed over 15 days with observations of bioluminescence emission and animal activity daily. Chitosan acetate treated mice infected with P. aeruginosa and P. mirabilis all survived while those receiving no treatment, alginate and silver sulfadiazine demonstrated 25-100% mortality. Chitosan acetate was much more effective than other treatments in rapidly reducing bioluminescence in the wound consistent with its rapid bactericidal activity in vitro as well as its light-scattering properties. S. aureus formed only non-lethal localized infections after temporary immunosuppression of the mice but HemCon was again more effective in reducing bioluminescence. The data suggest that chitosan acetate rapidly kills bacteria in the wound before systemic invasion can take place, and is superior to alginate bandage and silver sulfadiazine that may both encourage bacterial growth in the short term.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16616364
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9987
      1. Author :
        Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Wound repair and regeneration: official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        16
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bandages; Biocompatible Materials; Bioware; Chitosan; Cyclophosphamide; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Staphylococcal Skin Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Wound Healing; Wound Infection; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        HemCon bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18471261
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9986
      1. Author :
        Palmer, Kelli L; Aye, Lindsay M; Whiteley, Marvin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of bacteriology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adult; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacteriological Techniques; Bioware; Culture Media; Cystic Fibrosis; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Humans; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Sputum; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        The sputum (mucus) layer of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung is a complex substrate that provides Pseudomonas aeruginosa with carbon and energy to support high-density growth during chronic colonization. Unfortunately, the CF lung sputum layer has been difficult to mimic in animal models of CF disease, and mechanistic studies of P. aeruginosa physiology during growth in CF sputum are hampered by its complexity. In this study, we performed chromatographic and enzymatic analyses of CF sputum to develop a defined, synthetic CF sputum medium (SCFM) that mimics the nutritional composition of CF sputum. Importantly, P. aeruginosa displays similar phenotypes during growth in CF sputum and in SCFM, including similar growth rates, gene expression profiles, carbon substrate preferences, and cell-cell signaling profiles. Using SCFM, we provide evidence that aromatic amino acids serve as nutritional cues that influence cell-cell signaling and antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa during growth in CF sputum.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17873029
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9985
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        179
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Bacterial Adhesion; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Coxsackievirus Infections; Immunity, Mucosal; Immunoglobulin A; Lymphocyte Count; Lymphocytes; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Peyer's Patches; Receptors, Lymphocyte Homing; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        VAP-1, an ecto-enzyme expressed on the surface of endothelial cells, is involved in leukocyte trafficking between the blood and tissues under physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we used VAP-1-deficient mice to elucidate whether absence of VAP-1 alters the immune system under normal conditions and upon immunization and microbial challenge. We found that VAP-1-deficient mice display age-dependent paucity of lymphocytes, in the Peyer's patches of the gut. IgA concentration in serum was also found to be lower in VAP-1(-/-) animals than in wild-type mice. Although there were slightly less CD11a on B and T cells isolated from VAP-1-deficient mice than on those from wild-type mice, there were no differences in the expression of gut-homing-associated adhesion molecules or chemokine receptors. Because anti-VAP-1 therapies are being developed for clinical use to treat inflammation, we determined the effect of VAP-1 deletion on useful immune responses. Oral immunization with OVA showed defective T and B cell responses in VAP-1-deficient mice. Antimicrobial immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus and coxsackie B4 virus were also affected by the absence of VAP-1. Importantly, when the function of VAP-1 was acutely neutralized using small molecule enzyme inhibitors and anti-VAP-1 Abs rather than by gene deletion, no significant impairment in antimicrobial control was detected. In conclusion, VAP-1-deficient mice have mild deviations in the mucosal immune system and therapeutic targeting of VAP-1 does not appear to cause a generalized increase in the risk of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17947691
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9984
      1. Author :
        Li, Min; Rigby, Kevin; Lai, Yuping; Nair, Vinod; Peschel, Andreas; Schittek, Birgit; Otto, Michael
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Blotting, Southern; Chromatography, Thin Layer; Computational Biology; Cytochromes c; Genetic Complementation Test; Humans; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning; Microscopy, Immunoelectron; Mutagenesis; Peptides; Phospholipids; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) form an important part of the innate host defense. In contrast to most AMPs, human dermcidin has an anionic net charge. To investigate whether bacteria have developed specific mechanisms of resistance to dermcidin, we screened for mutants of the leading human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, with altered resistance to dermcidin. To that end, we constructed a plasmid for use in mariner-based transposon mutagenesis and developed a high-throughput cell viability screening method based on luminescence. In a large screen, we did not find mutants with strongly increased susceptibility to dermcidin, indicating that S. aureus has no specific mechanism of resistance to this AMP. Furthermore, we detected a mutation in a gene of unknown function that resulted in significantly increased resistance to dermcidin. The mutant strain had an altered membrane phospholipid pattern and showed decreased binding of dermcidin to the bacterial surface, indicating that dermcidin interacts with membrane phospholipids. The mode of this interaction was direct, as shown by assays of dermcidin binding to phospholipid preparations, and specific, as the resistance to other AMPs was not affected. Our findings indicate that dermcidin has an exceptional value for the human innate host defense and lend support to the idea that it evolved to evade bacterial resistance mechanisms targeted at the cationic character of most AMPs. Moreover, they suggest that the antimicrobial activity of dermcidin is dependent on the interaction with the bacterial membrane and might thus assist with the determination of the yet unknown mode of action of this important human AMP.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19596877
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9983
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, Constantinos; Barr, Stephanie; Adams, Christopher S; Hickok, Noreen J; Parvizi, Javad
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Clinical orthopaedics and related research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        468
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Biofilms; Bioware; Bone Substitutes; Bone Transplantation; Prostheses and Implants; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Transplantation, Homologous; Vancomycin; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND Bone grafts are frequently used to supplement bone stock and to establish structural stability. However, graft-associated infection represents a challenging complication leading to increased patient morbidity and healthcare costs. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES We therefore designed this study to (1) determine if increasing initial S. aureus inoculation of bone allograft results in a proportionate increase in colonization; (2) assess if antibiotics decrease colonization and if antibiotic tethering to allograft alters its ability to prevent bacterial colonization; and (3) determine if covalent modification alters the allograft topography or its biological properties. METHODS Allograft bone and vancomycin-modified bone (VAN-bone) was challenged with different doses of S. aureus for times out to 24 hours in the presence or absence of solution vancomycin. Bacterial colonization was assessed by fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by direct colony counting. Cell density and distribution of osteoblast-like cells on control and modified allograft were then compared. RESULTS Bacterial attachment was apparent within 6 hours with colonization and biofilm formation increasing with time and dose. Solution vancomycin failed to prevent bacterial attachment whereas VAN-bone successfully resisted colonization. The allograft modification did not affect the attachment and distribution of osteoblast-like cells. CONCLUSIONS Allograft bone was readily colonized by S. aureus and covered by a biofilm with especially florid growth in natural topographic niches. Using a novel covalent modification, allograft bone was able to resist colonization by organisms while retaining the ability to allow adhesion of osteoblastic cells. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Generation of allograft bone that can resist infection in vivo would be important in addressing one of the most challenging problems associated with the use of allograft, namely infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20361282
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9981
      1. Author :
        Sottnik, Joseph L; U'Ren, Lance W; Thamm, Douglas H; Withrow, Stephen J; Dow, Steven W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer immunology, immunotherapy: CII
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chronic Disease; Disease Models, Animal; Immunity, Innate; Killer Cells, Natural; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred Strains; Monocytes; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Osteomyelitis; Osteosarcoma; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Clinical studies over the past several years have reported that metastasis-free survival times in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma are significantly increased in patients that develop chronic bacterial osteomyelitis at their surgical site. However, the immunological mechanism by which osteomyelitis may suppress tumor growth has not been investigated. Therefore, we used a mouse model of osteomyelitis to assess the effects of bone infection on innate immunity and tumor growth. A chronic Staphylococcal osteomyelitis model was established in C3H mice and the effects of infection on tumor growth of syngeneic DLM8 osteosarcoma were assessed. The effects of infection on tumor angiogenesis and innate immunity, including NK cell and monocyte responses, were assessed. We found that osteomyelitis significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in mice, and that the effect was independent of the infecting bacterial type, tumor type, or mouse strain. Depletion of NK cells or monocytes reversed the antitumor activity elicited by infection. Moreover, infected mice had a significant increase in circulating monocytes and numbers of tumor associated macrophages. Infection suppressed tumor angiogenesis but did not affect the numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Therefore, we concluded that chronic localized bacterial infection could elicit significant systemic antitumor activity dependent on NK cells and macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19701748
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9980
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L; Sin, Lin V; Yu, Jun; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony F; Contag, Pamela R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibiotics, Antitubercular; Biofilms; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Diagnostic Imaging; DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Rifampin; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Eradication of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms after rifampin treatment was tested in a mouse model of device-related infection by using biophotonic imaging. Following treatment, the bioluminescent signals decreased to undetectable levels, irrespective of the age of the biofilm. After the final treatment, the signals rebounded in a time-dependent manner and reached those for the untreated mice. Readministration of rifampin was unsuccessful in eradicating reestablished infections, with the rifampin MICs for such bacteria being increased and with the bacteria having point mutations in the rpoB gene.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15155235
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9056
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