1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

191–200 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Mathew, B.; Jacobson, J. R.; Berdyshev, E.; Huang, Y.; Sun, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gerhold, L. M.; Siegler, J.; Evenoski, C.; Wang, T.; Zhou, T.; Zaidi, R.; Moreno-Vinasco, L.; Bittman, R.; Chen, C. T.; LaRiviere, P. J.; Sammani, S.; Lussier, Y. A.; Dudek, S. M.; Natarajan, V.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Garcia, J. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Faseb J
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry; Ceramides/metabolism; Female; Gene Deletion; Gene Expression Regulation/physiology; Lung/*radiation effects; Lysophospholipids/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; *Radiation Injuries, Experimental; Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/genetics/metabolism; Sphingolipids/*metabolism; Sphingosine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1(-/-)) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1(+/-), S1PR2(-/-), and S1PR3(-/-)) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10371
      1. Author :
        Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor
      2. Title :
        Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: A possible implication for atherogenesis
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Food Funct.
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 6049
      15. Serial :
        14630
      1. Author :
        Jadert, C.; Petersson, J.; Massena, S.; Ahl, D.; Grapensparr, L.; Holm, L.; Lundberg, J. O.; Phillipson, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Free Radic Biol Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Nitric oxide (NO) generated by vascular NO synthases can exert anti-inflammatory effects, partly through its ability to decrease leukocyte recruitment. Inorganic nitrate and nitrite, from endogenous or dietary sources, have emerged as alternative substrates for NO formation in mammals. Bioactivation of nitrate is believed to require initial reduction to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria. Here we investigated the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on leukocyte recruitment in microvascular inflammation and in NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury. We show that leukocyte emigration in response to the proinflammatory chemokine MIP-2 is reduced by 70% after 7days of dietary nitrate supplementation as well as by acute intravenous nitrite administration. Nitrite also reduced leukocyte adhesion to a similar extent and this effect was inhibited by the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ, whereas the effect on emigrated leukocytes was not altered by this treatment. Further studies in TNF-alpha-stimulated endothelial cells revealed that nitrite dose-dependently reduced the expression of ICAM-1. In rats and mice subjected to a challenge with diclofenac, dietary nitrate prevented the increase in myeloperoxidase and P-selectin levels in small-intestinal tissue. Antiseptic mouthwash, which eliminates oral nitrate reduction, markedly blunted the protective effect of dietary nitrate on P-selectin levels. Despite attenuation of the acute immune response, the overall ability to clear an infection with Staphylococcus aureus was not suppressed by dietary nitrate as revealed by noninvasive IVIS imaging. We conclude that dietary nitrate markedly reduces leukocyte recruitment to inflammation in a process involving attenuation of P-selectin and ICAM-1 upregulation. Bioactivation of dietary nitrate requires intermediate formation of nitrite by oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and then probably further reduction to NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides in the tissues.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22178413
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10452
      1. Author :
        Lorentzen, D.; Durairaj, L.; Pezzulo, A. A.; Nakano, Y.; Launspach, J.; Stoltz, D. A.; Zamba, G.; McCray, P. B., Jr.; Zabner, J.; Welsh, M. J.; Nauseef, W. M.; Banfi, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Free Radic Biol Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A recently discovered enzyme system produces antibacterial hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the airway lumen by oxidizing the secreted precursor thiocyanate (SCN(-)). Airway epithelial cultures have been shown to secrete SCN(-) in a CFTR-dependent manner. Thus, reduced SCN(-) availability in the airway might contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene and characterized by an airway host defense defect. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the SCN(-) concentration in the nasal airway surface liquid (ASL) of CF patients and non-CF subjects and in the tracheobronchial ASL of CFTR-DeltaF508 homozygous pigs and control littermates. In the nasal ASL, the SCN(-) concentration was ~30-fold higher than in serum independent of the CFTR mutation status of the human subject. In the tracheobronchial ASL of CF pigs, the SCN(-) concentration was somewhat reduced. Among human subjects, SCN(-) concentrations in the ASL varied from person to person independent of CFTR expression, and CF patients with high SCN(-) levels had better lung function than those with low SCN(-) levels. Thus, although CFTR can contribute to SCN(-) transport, it is not indispensable for the high SCN(-) concentration in ASL. The correlation between lung function and SCN(-) concentration in CF patients may reflect a beneficial role for SCN(-).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21334431
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10564
      1. Author :
        Cernak, I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Front Neurol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight
      12. Abstract :
        Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body parallel, blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as (1) direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and (2) via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body's fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21206523
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10420
      1. Author :
        Ohlsen, Knut; Lorenz, Udo
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Future microbiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Community-Acquired Infections; Humans; Methicillin Resistance; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Multiple resistant staphylococci that cause significant morbidity and mortality are the leading cause of nosocomial infections. Meanwhile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also spreads in the community, where highly virulent strains infect children and young adults who have no predisposing risk factors. Although some treatment options remain, the search for new antibacterial targets and lead compounds is urgently required to ensure that staphylococcal infections can be effectively treated in the future. Promising targets for new antibacterials are gene products that are involved in essential cell functions. In addition to antibacterials, active and passive immunization strategies are being developed that target surface components of staphylococci such as cell wall-linked adhesins, teichoic acids and capsule or immunodominant antigens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18041906
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9049
      1. Author :
        van der Horst, G.; van der Pluijm, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Future Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Humans; Molecular Imaging/methods; Neoplasm Metastasis/diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        Bone metastasis is a complex process that ultimately leads to devastating metastatic bone disease. It is therefore of key interest to unravel the mechanisms underlying the multistep process of skeletal metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease, and to develop better treatment and management of patients with this devastating disease. Fortunately, novel technologies are rapidly emerging that allow real-time imaging of molecules, pathogenic processes, drug delivery and drug response in preclinical in vivo models. The outcome of these experimental studies will facilitate clinical cancer research by improving the detection of cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapy response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22515445
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 30
      15. Serial :
        10384
      1. Author :
        van der Horst, G.; van der Pluijm, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Future Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Humans; Molecular Imaging/methods; Neoplasm Metastasis/diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        Bone metastasis is a complex process that ultimately leads to devastating metastatic bone disease. It is therefore of key interest to unravel the mechanisms underlying the multistep process of skeletal metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease, and to develop better treatment and management of patients with this devastating disease. Fortunately, novel technologies are rapidly emerging that allow real-time imaging of molecules, pathogenic processes, drug delivery and drug response in preclinical in vivo models. The outcome of these experimental studies will facilitate clinical cancer research by improving the detection of cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapy response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22515445
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10478
      1. Author :
        Ignat M, Aprahamian M, Lindner V, Altmeyer A, Perretta S, Dallemagne B, Mutter D and Marescaux J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Gastroenterology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        137
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; AngioSense; AngioSpark; in vivo imaging; pancreatic cancer
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND & AIMS: Surgical management of pancreatic cancer depends on tumor resectability and staging. This study evaluated a new in vivo technique, fiberoptic confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), for detection and staging of pancreatic tumors in rats.

        METHODS: FCFM was used with a protease-activated fluorescent marker (ProSense; VisEn Medical Inc, Woburn, MA) for in vivo imaging of solid organs (1.8-microm resolution) in a rat model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. A preliminary study described the FCFM rendering of normal and pathologic tissues. Subsequently, 2 double-blind studies compared FCFM to standard histology in (1) detection of tumors in rat models of cancer and controls and (2) detection of nodal involvement (splenic, celiac, mesenteric, and colic) 4, 5, and 6 weeks after tumor induction vs controls.

        RESULTS: Tumor cells displayed a fluorescent ductal pattern compared with non-fluorescent normal pancreas or normal follicular pattern of lymph nodes (LNs). FCFM detected all the pancreatic tumors (1.7-mm mean diameter) and identified 23 LNs that contained metastases of 99 LNs examined. Standard histologic analyses resulted in 1 false-negative result in tumor detection and 2 false negatives in LN detection, whereas FCFM produced no false-negative results. Additional serial sectioning confirmed all tumors and 16 metastatic LNs; FCFM had a negative predictive value of 100% and a positive predictive value of 69.6%.

        CONCLUSIONS: Real-time “virtual biopsy” using FCFM detects tumors and LN metastases with 100% sensitivity and 92.2% specificity in rats, making it a reliable technique for detection and staging of pancreatic cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19632230
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4540
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All