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      1. Author :
        Bethunaickan, R.; Berthier, C.C.; Ramanujam, M.; Sahu, R.; Zhang, W.; Sun, Y.; Bottinger, E.P.; Ivashkiv, L.; Kretzler, M.; Davidson, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo; kidney; mice; MMPSense 680; ProSense 680
      12. Abstract :
        Renal infiltration with mononuclear cells is associated with poor prognosis in systemic lupus erythematosus. A renal macrophage/dendritic cell signature is associated with the onset of nephritis in NZB/W mice, and immune-modulating therapies can reverse this signature and the associated renal damage despite ongoing immune complex deposition. In nephritic NZB/W mice, renal F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) macrophages are located throughout the interstitium, whereas F4/80(lo)/CD11c(hi) dendritic cells accumulate in perivascular lymphoid aggregates. We show here that F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) renal macrophages have a Gr1(lo)/Ly6C(lo)/VLA4(lo)/MHCII(hi)/CD43(lo)/CD62L(lo) phenotype different from that described for inflammatory macrophages. At nephritis onset, F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) cells upregulate cell surface CD11b, acquire cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase activity, and accumulate large numbers of autophagocytic vacuoles; these changes reverse after the induction of remission. Latex bead labeling of peripheral blood Gr1(lo) monocytes indicates that these are the source of F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) macrophages. CD11c(hi)/MHCII(lo) dendritic cells are found in the kidneys only after proteinuria onset, turnover rapidly, and disappear rapidly after remission induction. Gene expression profiling of the F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) population displays increased expression of proinflammatory, regulatory, and tissue repair/degradation-associated genes at nephritis onset that reverses with remission induction. Our findings suggest that mononuclear phagocytes with an aberrant activation profile contribute to tissue damage in lupus nephritis by mediating both local inflammation and excessive tissue remodeling.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21411733
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8549
      15. Serial :
        4801
      1. Author :
        Marttila-Ichihara, Fumiko; Castermans, Karolien; Auvinen, Kaisa; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Griffioen, Arjan W; Salmi, Marko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adjuvants, Immunologic; Allylamine; Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Antibodies, Blocking; Antibodies, Monoclonal; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Migration Inhibition; Enzyme Inhibitors; Female; Growth Inhibitors; Lymphoma, T-Cell; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Myeloid Cells; Semicarbazides
      12. Abstract :
        Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial, cell surface-expressed oxidase involved in leukocyte traffic. The adhesive function of VAP-1 can be blocked by anti-VAP-1 Abs and small-molecule inhibitors. However, the effects of VAP-1 blockade on antitumor immunity and tumor progression are unknown. In this paper, we used anti-VAP-1 mAbs and small-molecule inhibitors of VAP-1 in B16 melanoma and EL-4 lymphoma tumor models in C57BL/6 mice. Leukocyte accumulation into tumors and neoangiogenesis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and intravital videomicroscopy. We found that both anti-VAP-1 Abs and VAP-1 inhibitors reduced the number of leukocytes in the tumors, but they targeted partially different leukocyte subpopulations. Anti-VAP-1 Abs selectively inhibited infiltration of CD8-positive lymphocytes into tumors and had no effect on accumulation of myeloid cells into tumors. In contrast, the VAP-1 inhibitors significantly reduced only the number of proangiogenic Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in melanomas and lymphomas. Blocking of VAP-1 by either means left tumor homing of regulatory T cells and type 2 immune-suppressing monocytes/macrophages intact. Notably, VAP-1 inhibitors, but not anti-VAP-1 Abs, retarded the growth of melanomas and lymphomas and reduced tumor neoangiogenesis. The VAP-1 inhibitors also reduced the binding of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells to the tumor vasculature. We conclude that tumors use the catalytic activity of VAP-1 to recruit myeloid cells into tumors and to support tumor progression. Small-molecule VAP-1 inhibitors therefore might be a potential new tool for immunotherapy of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20154208
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8996
      1. Author :
        Park, Hae-Sun; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Cleary, P Patrick
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        171
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Intranasal; Animals; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Intracellular Fluid; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Mucosa; Nasopharynx; Palatine Tonsil; pXen-5; Streptococcal Infections; Streptococcus pyogenes
      12. Abstract :
        Human tonsils are suspected to be an antibiotic-impervious human reservoir for group A streptococcus. An intranasal infection model in mice and a bioluminescent-tagged strain were used to investigate this possibility. Viable streptococci were predominantly found both intra- and extracellularly in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), a human tonsil homologue. Ulex europaeus-1, a membranous (M) cell-specific lectin, identified cells harboring streptococci at the epithelial surface of NALT and blocked bacterial colonization of this tissue. These results suggest that M cells in NALT transport this Gram-positive pathogen across the epithelial layers in a manner similar to those in Peyer's patches, which permit enteric pathogens to invade deeper tissues from the gastrointestinal tract.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12928403
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9025
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Sequence; Animals; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; Bacterial Infections; Bioware; Cell Line; Cells, Cultured; Chemokine CCL2; Chemokine CCL7; Chemokine CXCL1; Chemokines; Female; Humans; Interleukin-8; Leukocytes; Leukocytes, Mononuclear; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Molecular Sequence Data; NF-kappa B; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Phosphorylation; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29, Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        With the rapid rise in the incidence of multidrug resistant infections, there is substantial interest in host defense peptides as templates for production of new antimicrobial therapeutics. Natural peptides are multifunctional mediators of the innate immune response, with some direct antimicrobial activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study, an immunomodulatory peptide IDR-1002 was selected from a library of bactenecin derivatives based on its substantially more potent ability to induce chemokines in human PBMCs. The enhanced chemokine induction activity of the peptide in vitro correlated with stronger protective activity in vivo in the Staphylococcus aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor and the PI3K, NF-kappaB, and MAPK signaling pathways. The protective activity of the peptide was associated with in vivo augmentation of chemokine production and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of infection. These results highlight the importance of the chemokine induction activity of host defense peptides and demonstrate that the optimization of the ex vivo chemokine-induction properties of peptides is a promising method for the rational development of immunomodulatory IDR peptides with enhanced anti-infective activity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20107187
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9033
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        179
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Bacterial Adhesion; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Coxsackievirus Infections; Immunity, Mucosal; Immunoglobulin A; Lymphocyte Count; Lymphocytes; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Peyer's Patches; Receptors, Lymphocyte Homing; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        VAP-1, an ecto-enzyme expressed on the surface of endothelial cells, is involved in leukocyte trafficking between the blood and tissues under physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we used VAP-1-deficient mice to elucidate whether absence of VAP-1 alters the immune system under normal conditions and upon immunization and microbial challenge. We found that VAP-1-deficient mice display age-dependent paucity of lymphocytes, in the Peyer's patches of the gut. IgA concentration in serum was also found to be lower in VAP-1(-/-) animals than in wild-type mice. Although there were slightly less CD11a on B and T cells isolated from VAP-1-deficient mice than on those from wild-type mice, there were no differences in the expression of gut-homing-associated adhesion molecules or chemokine receptors. Because anti-VAP-1 therapies are being developed for clinical use to treat inflammation, we determined the effect of VAP-1 deletion on useful immune responses. Oral immunization with OVA showed defective T and B cell responses in VAP-1-deficient mice. Antimicrobial immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus and coxsackie B4 virus were also affected by the absence of VAP-1. Importantly, when the function of VAP-1 was acutely neutralized using small molecule enzyme inhibitors and anti-VAP-1 Abs rather than by gene deletion, no significant impairment in antimicrobial control was detected. In conclusion, VAP-1-deficient mice have mild deviations in the mucosal immune system and therapeutic targeting of VAP-1 does not appear to cause a generalized increase in the risk of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17947691
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9984
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, Ruxana T; Zeng, Heng; Yull, Fiona E; Li, Bo; Cheng, Dong-sheng; Kernodle, Douglas S; Jansen, E Duco; Contag, Christopher H; Segal, Brahm H; Holland, Steven M; Blackwell, Timothy S; Christman, John W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        172
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Cells, Cultured; Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic; Immunity, Innate; Lung; Macrophages; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Inbred DBA; Mice, Transgenic; NADPH Oxidase; Neutrophil Infiltration; NF-kappa B; Phosphoproteins; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Pseudomonas Infections; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Toll-Like Receptors; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        We examined the role of redox signaling generated by NADPH oxidase in activation of NF-kappaB and host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Using mice with an NF-kappaB-driven luciferase reporter construct (HIV-LTR/luciferase (HLL)), we found that intratracheal administration of P. aeruginosa resulted in a dose-dependent neutrophilic influx and activation of NF-kappaB. To determine the effects of reactive oxygen species generated by the NADPH oxidase system on activation of NF-kappaB, we crossbred mice deficient in p47(phox) with NF-kappaB reporter mice (p47(phox-/-)HLL). These p47(phox-/-)HLL mice were unable to activate NF-kappaB to the same degree as HLL mice with intact NADPH oxidase following P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, lung TNF-alpha levels were significantly lower in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice compared with HLL mice. Bacterial clearance was impaired in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice. In vitro studies using bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that Toll-like receptor 4 was necessary for NF-kappaB activation following treatment with P. aeruginosa. Additional studies with macrophages from p47(phox-/-) mice confirmed that redox signaling was necessary for maximal Toll-like receptor 4-dependent NF-kappaB activation in this model. These data indicate that the NADPH oxidase-dependent respiratory burst stimulated by Pseudomonas infection contributes to host defense by modulating redox-dependent signaling through the NF-kappaB pathway.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14734763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9999
      1. Author :
        Yang, Li; Johansson, Jan; Ridsdale, Ross; Willander, Hanna; Fitzen, Michael; Akinbi, Henry T; Weaver, Timothy E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Immunity, Innate; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Macrophages, Alveolar; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Protein Precursors; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Proteolipids; Saposins; Staphylococcus aureus; Tissue Distribution; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Surfactant protein B (SP-B) proprotein contains three saposin-like protein (SAPLIP) domains: a SAPLIP domain corresponding to the mature SP-B peptide is essential for lung function and postnatal survival; the function of SAPLIP domains in the N-terminal (SP-BN) and C-terminal regions of the proprotein is not known. In the current study, SP-BN was detected in the supernatant of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in nonciliated bronchiolar cells, alveolar type II epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophages. rSP-BN indirectly promoted the uptake of bacteria by macrophage cell lines and directly killed bacteria at acidic pH, consistent with a lysosomal, antimicrobial function. Native SP-BN isolated from BALF also killed bacteria but only at acidic pH; the bactericidal activity of BALF at acidic pH was completely blocked by SP-BN Ab. Transgenic mice overexpressing SP-BN and mature SP-B peptide had significantly decreased bacterial burden and increased survival following intranasal inoculation with bacteria. These findings support the hypothesis that SP-BN contributes to innate host defense of the lung by supplementing the nonoxidant antimicrobial defenses of alveolar macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20007532
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9995
      1. Author :
        Echchannaoui, H.; Frei, K.; Schnell, C.; Leib, S. L.; Zimmerli, W.; Landmann, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Infectious Diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        186
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Ceftriaxone/therapeutic use, Cephalosporins/therapeutic use, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Susceptibility, Drosophila Proteins, Inflammation/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Listeria Infections/genetics/immunology, Listeria monocytogenes/genetics/immunology, Membrane Glycoproteins/ deficiency/genetics, Meningitis, Bacterial/ genetics/ immunology/microbiology/pathology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Pneumococcal Infections/genetics/immunology/microbiology/pathology, Receptors, Cell Surface/ deficiency/genetics, Streptococcus pneumoniae/ immunology, Time Factors, Toll-Like Receptor 2, Toll-Like Receptors IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) mediates host responses to gram-positive bacterial wall components. TLR2 function was investigated in a murine Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis model in wild-type (wt) and TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. TLR2(-/-) mice showed earlier time of death than wt mice (P<.02). Plasma interleukin-6 levels and bacterial numbers in blood and peripheral organs were similar for both strains. With ceftriaxone therapy, none of the wt but 27% of the TLR2(-/-) mice died (P<.04). Beyond 3 hours after infection, TLR2(-/-) mice had higher bacterial loads in brain than did wt mice, as assessed with luciferase-tagged S. pneumoniae by means of a Xenogen-CCD (charge-coupled device) camera. After 24 h, tumor necrosis factor activity was higher in cerebrospinal fluid of TLR2(-/-) than wt mice (P<.05) and was related to increased blood-brain barrier permeability (Evans blue staining, P<.02). In conclusion, the lack of TLR2 was associated with earlier death from meningitis, which was not due to sepsis but to reduced brain bacterial clearing, followed by increased intrathecal inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12198614
      14. Call Number :
        137638
      15. Serial :
        7950
      1. Author :
        Inglefield, Jon R; Dumitru, Calin Dan; Alkan, Sefik S; Gibson, Sheila J; Lipson, Kenneth E; Tomai, Mark A; Larson, Chris J; Vasilakos, John P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of interferon & cytokine research: the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aminoquinolines; Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Culture Media, Conditioned; dendritic cells; Humans; Interferon Type I; Leukocytes, Mononuclear; Lung; Melanoma; Mice; Neoplasms; Oligodeoxyribonucleotides; Quinolines; Subcellular Fractions; Sulfonamides; Toll-Like Receptor 7
      12. Abstract :
        Antitumor effects of the toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist, 852A, were evaluated. Supernatants from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with 852A inhibited the proliferation of tumor cell lines Hs294T and 769-P but had no effect on others (786-O and Caki-1). Because addition of 852A directly to the Hs294T cells did not inhibit their proliferation, the mechanism(s) of inhibition of tumor cell proliferation was investigated. Low nanomolar concentrations of 852A stimulated the production of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) from human PBMCs. Cytokines stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of 852A were sufficient to inhibit Hs294T proliferation. At higher concentrations (3-30 microM), 852A induced the production of IL-12p70, IL-18, and IFN-gamma. PBMC cultures depleted of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) did not produce IFN-alpha, and their conditioned medium did not inhibit Hs294T proliferation. Anti-IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) and anti-IFN-alpha antibodies partially abrogated Hs294T proliferation inhibition by 852A-stimulated PBMC supernatants, whereas separate neutralization of TRAIL, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IFN-beta, or IFN-omega had no effect. In vivo, six doses of 852A administration significantly delayed the onset of lung colonies in a B16 melanoma model. Thus, the results demonstrate that the TLR7 agonist 852A inhibits in vitro proliferation of some tumor cells in a pDC-dependent and IFN-alpha-dependent manner and can delay tumor growth in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18439103
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9001
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