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      1. Author :
        Sehrawat, A.; Arlotti, J. A.; Murakami, A.; Singh, S. V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Breast Cancer Res Treat
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        136
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        The present study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of zerumbone (ZER), a sesquiterpene from subtropical ginger, against human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. ZER treatment caused a dose-dependent decrease in viability of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in association with G(2)/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction. ZER-mediated cell cycle arrest was associated with downregulation of cyclin B1, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Cdc25C, and Cdc25B. Even though ZER treatment caused stabilization of p53 and induction of PUMA, these proteins were dispensable for ZER-induced cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Exposure of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells to ZER resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2 but its ectopic expression failed to confer protection against ZER-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, the SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax and Bak double knockout mice were significantly more resistant to ZER-induced apoptosis. ZER-treated MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells exhibited a robust activation of both Bax and Bak. In vivo growth of orthotopic MDA-MB-231 xenografts was significantly retarded by ZER administration in association with apoptosis induction and suppression of cell proliferation (Ki-67 expression). These results indicate that ZER causes G(2)/M phase cell cycle arrest and Bax/Bak-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells, and retards growth of MDA-MB-231 xenografts in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23053663
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10518
      1. Author :
        Beck, Benjamin H; Kim, Hyung-Gyoon; Kim, Hyunki; Samuel, Sharon; Liu, Zhiyong; Shrestha, Robin; Haines, Hilary; Zinn, Kurt; Lopez, Richard D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research and treatment
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        122
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2; Adenocarcinoma; Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Cytotoxicity, Immunologic; Female; Humans; Immunotherapy, Adoptive; Indium Radioisotopes; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Knockout; Neoplasm Transplantation; Radiopharmaceuticals; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta; Spleen; Tissue Distribution; T-Lymphocyte Subsets; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon; Transplantation, Heterologous; Transplantation, Isogeneic
      12. Abstract :
        In contrast to antigen-specific alphabeta-T cells (adaptive immune system), gammadelta-T cells can recognize and lyse malignantly transformed cells almost immediately upon encounter in a manner that does not require the recognition of tumor-specific antigens (innate immune system). Given the well-documented capacity of gammadelta-T cells to innately kill a variety of malignant cells, efforts are now actively underway to exploit the antitumor properties of gammadelta-T cells for clinical purposes. Here, we present for the first time preclinical in vivo mouse models of gammadelta-T cell-based immunotherapy directed against breast cancer. These studies were explicitly designed to approximate clinical situations in which adoptively transferred gammadelta-T cells would be employed therapeutically against breast cancer. Using radioisotope-labeled gammadelta-T cells, we first show that adoptively transferred gammadelta-T cells localize to breast tumors in a mouse model (4T1 mammary adenocarcinoma) of human breast cancer. Moreover, by using an antibody directed against the gammadelta-T cell receptor (TCR), we determined that localization of adoptively transferred gammadelta-T cells to tumor is a TCR-dependant process. Additionally, biodistribution studies revealed that adoptively transferred gammadelta-T cells traffic differently in tumor-bearing mice compared to healthy mice with fewer gammadelta-T cells localizing into the spleens of tumor-bearing mice. Finally, in both syngeneic (4T1) and xenogeneic (2Lmp) models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that adoptively transferred gammadelta-T cells are both effective against breast cancer and are otherwise well-tolerated by treated animals. These findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for using ex vivo expanded adoptively transferred gammadelta-T cells as a form of cell-based immunotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer. Additionally, these studies establish that clinically applicable methods for radiolabeling gammadelta-T cells allows for the tracking of adoptively transferred gammadelta-T cells in tumor-bearing hosts.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19763820
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8939
      1. Author :
        Neal, Robert E, 2nd; Singh, Ravi; Hatcher, Heather C; Kock, Nancy D; Torti, Suzy V; Davalos, Rafael V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research and treatment
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        123
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Electrochemotherapy; Electrodes; Female; Humans; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Needles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a therapeutic technology for the ablation of soft tissues using electrodes to deliver intense but short electric pulses across a cell membrane, creating nanopores that lead to cell death. This phenomenon only affects the cell membrane, leaving the extracellular matrix and sensitive structures intact, making it a promising technique for the treatment many types of tumors. In this paper, we present the first in vivo study to achieve tumor regression using a translatable, clinically relevant single needle electrode for treatment administration. Numerical models of the electric field distribution for the protocol used suggest that a 1000 V/cm field threshold is sufficient to treat a tumor, and that the electric field distribution will slightly decrease if the same protocol were used on a tumor deep seated within a human breast. Tumor regression was observed in 5 out of 7 MDA-MB231 human mammary tumors orthotopically implanted in female Nu/Nu mice, with continued growth in controls.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20191380
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8988
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E; Hornig, Yvette S; Oei, Yoko; Dusich, Joan; Purchio, Tony
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research: BCR
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Luciferases; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Plasmids; Transplantation, Heterologous; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION Our goal was to generate xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer based on luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 tumor cells that would provide rapid mammary tumor growth; produce metastasis to clinically relevant tissues such as lymph nodes, lung, and bone; and permit sensitive in vivo detection of both primary and secondary tumor sites by bioluminescent imaging. METHOD Two clonal cell sublines of human MDA-MB-231 cells that stably expressed firefly luciferase were isolated following transfection of the parental cells with luciferase cDNA. Each subline was passaged once or twice in vivo to enhance primary tumor growth and to increase metastasis. The resulting luciferase-expressing D3H1 and D3H2LN cells were analyzed for long-term bioluminescent stability, primary tumor growth, and distal metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bone and soft tissues by bioluminescent imaging. Cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of nude and nude-beige mice or were delivered systemically via intracardiac injection. Metastasis was also evaluated by ex vivo imaging and histologic analysis postmortem. RESULTS The D3H1 and D3H2LN cell lines exhibited long-term stable luciferase expression for up to 4-6 months of accumulative tumor growth time in vivo. Bioluminescent imaging quantified primary mammary fat pad tumor development and detected early spontaneous lymph node metastasis in vivo. Increased frequency of spontaneous lymph node metastasis was observed with D3H2LN tumors as compared with D3H1 tumors. With postmortem ex vivo imaging, we detected additional lung micrometastasis in mice with D3H2LN mammary tumors. Subsequent histologic evaluation of tissue sections from lymph nodes and lung lobes confirmed spontaneous tumor metastasis at these sites. Following intracardiac injection of the MDA-MB-231-luc tumor cells, early metastasis to skeletal tissues, lymph nodes, brain and various visceral organs was detected. Weekly in vivo imaging data permitted longitudinal analysis of metastasis at multiple sites simultaneously. Ex vivo imaging data from sampled tissues verified both skeletal and multiple soft tissue tumor metastasis. CONCLUSION This study characterized two new bioluminescent MDA-MB-231-luc human breast carcinoma cell lines with enhanced tumor growth and widespread metastasis in mice. Their application to current xenograft models of breast cancer offers rapid and highly sensitive detection options for preclinical assessment of anticancer therapies in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15987449
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8960
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E; Hornig, Yvette S; Oei, Yoko; Dusich, Joan; Purchio, Tony
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research: BCR
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Luciferases; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Plasmids; Transplantation, Heterologous; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION Our goal was to generate xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer based on luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 tumor cells that would provide rapid mammary tumor growth; produce metastasis to clinically relevant tissues such as lymph nodes, lung, and bone; and permit sensitive in vivo detection of both primary and secondary tumor sites by bioluminescent imaging. METHOD Two clonal cell sublines of human MDA-MB-231 cells that stably expressed firefly luciferase were isolated following transfection of the parental cells with luciferase cDNA. Each subline was passaged once or twice in vivo to enhance primary tumor growth and to increase metastasis. The resulting luciferase-expressing D3H1 and D3H2LN cells were analyzed for long-term bioluminescent stability, primary tumor growth, and distal metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bone and soft tissues by bioluminescent imaging. Cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of nude and nude-beige mice or were delivered systemically via intracardiac injection. Metastasis was also evaluated by ex vivo imaging and histologic analysis postmortem. RESULTS The D3H1 and D3H2LN cell lines exhibited long-term stable luciferase expression for up to 4-6 months of accumulative tumor growth time in vivo. Bioluminescent imaging quantified primary mammary fat pad tumor development and detected early spontaneous lymph node metastasis in vivo. Increased frequency of spontaneous lymph node metastasis was observed with D3H2LN tumors as compared with D3H1 tumors. With postmortem ex vivo imaging, we detected additional lung micrometastasis in mice with D3H2LN mammary tumors. Subsequent histologic evaluation of tissue sections from lymph nodes and lung lobes confirmed spontaneous tumor metastasis at these sites. Following intracardiac injection of the MDA-MB-231-luc tumor cells, early metastasis to skeletal tissues, lymph nodes, brain and various visceral organs was detected. Weekly in vivo imaging data permitted longitudinal analysis of metastasis at multiple sites simultaneously. Ex vivo imaging data from sampled tissues verified both skeletal and multiple soft tissue tumor metastasis. CONCLUSION This study characterized two new bioluminescent MDA-MB-231-luc human breast carcinoma cell lines with enhanced tumor growth and widespread metastasis in mice. Their application to current xenograft models of breast cancer offers rapid and highly sensitive detection options for preclinical assessment of anticancer therapies in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15987449
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8993
      1. Author :
        Wang, M.; Gartel, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Biol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, IVIS, Breast cancer, Bioware, Adenocarcinoma/*drug therapy/pathology; Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy; Protocols/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Apoptosis; Boronic Acids/administration & dosage; Breast Neoplasms/*drug therapy/pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Synergism; Female; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanocapsules/administration & dosage; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism; Pyrazines/administration & dosage; Random Allocation; Thiostrepton/administration & dosage; Tissue Distribution; Tumor Burden/drug effects; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Bortezomib is well-known for inducing cell death in cancer cells, specifically through the mechanism of proteasome inhibition. Thiostrepton, a thiazole antibiotic, has also been described for its proteasome inhibitory action, although differing slightly to bortezomib in the proteasomal site to which it is active. Previously we had shown the synergic effect of bortezomib and thiostrepton in breast cancer cells in vitro, where sub-apoptotic concentrations of both proteasome inhibitors resulted in synergic increase in cell death when combined as a treatment. Here, we administered such a combination to MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors in vivo, and found that the effect of complementary proteasome inhibitors reduced tumor growth rates more efficiently than compared with when administered alone. Increased induction of apoptotic activity in tumors was found be associated with the growth inhibitory activity of combination treatment. Further examination additionally revealed that combination-treated tumors exhibited reduced proteasome activity, compared with non-treated and single drug-treated tumors. These data suggest that this drug combination may be useful as a therapy for solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22353937
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10510
      1. Author :
        Hu, Guohong; Chong, Robert A; Yang, Qifeng; Wei, Yong; Blanco, Mario A; Li, Feng; Reiss, Michael; Au, Jessie L-S; Haffty, Bruce G; Kang, Yibin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer cell
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aldehyde Dehydrogenase; Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm; Gene Expression Profiling; Genome, Human; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local; Prognosis; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met; Receptors, Growth Factor; Survival Rate; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Targeted therapy for metastatic diseases relies on the identification of functionally important metastasis genes from a large number of random genetic alterations. Here we use a computational algorithm to map minimal recurrent genomic alterations associated with poor-prognosis breast cancer. 8q22 genomic gain was identified by this approach and validated in an extensive collection of breast tumor samples. Regional gain of 8q22 elevates expression of the metastasis gene metadherin (MTDH), which is overexpressed in more than 40% of breast cancers and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Functional characterization of MTDH revealed its dual role in promoting metastatic seeding and enhancing chemoresistance. These findings establish MTDH as an important therapeutic target for simultaneously enhancing chemotherapy efficacy and reducing metastasis risk.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19111877
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8957
      1. Author :
        Tseng, J. C.; Granot, T.; DiGiacomo, V.; Levin, B.; Meruelo, D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, IVIS, Alphavirus Infections/pathology/*therapy/virology; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use; Blotting, Western; Cell Membrane Permeability; Combined Modality Therapy; Cricetinae; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; *Genetic Vectors; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neovascularization, Pathologic/*prevention & control; Neuroblastoma/blood supply/therapy/virology; *Oncolytic Virotherapy; Ovarian Neoplasms/*blood supply/*therapy/virology; Paclitaxel/therapeutic use; Sindbis Virus/*physiology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19798121
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10442
      1. Author :
        Zhang, Z.; Hu, Z.; Gupta, J.; Krimmel, J. D.; Gerseny, H. M.; Berg, A. F.; Robbins, J. S.; Du, H.; Prabhakar, B.; Seth, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Adenoviridae/genetics/*metabolism/physiology; Administration, Intravenous; Animals; Bone Neoplasms/secondary/*therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Humans; Immunocompetence; Luminescent Measurements/methods; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/*therapy; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Oncolytic Virotherapy/methods; Oncolytic Viruses/genetics/metabolism/physiology; Phosphorylation; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics/*metabolism; Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta/genetics/*metabolism; Signal Transduction; Smad2 Protein/genetics/metabolism; Telomerase/genetics; Transforming Growth Factor beta1/genetics/metabolism; Transplantation, Isogeneic/methods; Tumor Stem Cell Assay/methods; Virus Replication
      12. Abstract :
        We have examined the effect of adenoviruses expressing soluble transforming growth factor receptorII-Fc (sTGFbetaRIIFc) in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor bone metastasis model using syngeneic BALB/c mice. Infection of 4T1 cells with a non-replicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).sTbetaRFc, or with two oncolytic adenoviruses, Ad.sTbetaRFc and TAd.sTbetaRFc, expressing sTGFbetaRIIFc (the human TERT promoter drives viral replication in TAd.sTbetaRFc) produced sTGFbetaRIIFc protein. Oncolytic adenoviruses produced viral replication and induced cytotoxicity in 4T1 cells. 4T1 cells were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TGFbeta-1 (up to 10 ng ml(-1)). However, TGFbeta-1 induced the phosphorylation of SMAD2 and SMAD3, which were inhibited by co-incubation with sTGFbetaRIIFc protein. TGFbeta-1 also induced interleukin-11, a well-known osteolytic factor. Intracardiac injection of 4T1-luc2 cells produced bone metastases by day 4. Intravenous injection of Ad.sTbetaRFc (on days 5 and 7) followed by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of mice on days 7, 11 and 14 in tumor-bearing mice indicated inhibition of bone metastasis progression (P<0.05). X-ray radiography of mice on day 14 showed a significant reduction of the lesion size by Ad.sTbetaRFc (P<0.01) and TAd.sTbetaRFc (P<0.05). Replication-deficient virus Ad(E1-).sTbetaRFc expressing sTGFbetaRIIFc showed some inhibition of bone metastasis, whereas Ad(E1-).Null was not effective in inhibiting bone metastases. Thus, systemic administration of Ad.sTbetaRFc and TAd.sTbetaRFc can inhibit bone metastasis in the 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model, and can be developed as potential anti-tumor agents for breast cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744210
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10479
      1. Author :
        J-C Tseng; T Granot; V DiGiacomo; B Levin; D Meruelo
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Sindbis virus; viral vector; vascular leakiness; molecular imaging; chemotherapy; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/cgt/journal/v17/n4/full/cgt200970a.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4485
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