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      1. Author :
        Oashi, K.; Furukawa, H.; Nishihara, H.; Ozaki, M.; Oyama, A.; Funayama, E.; Hayashi, T.; Kuge, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Invest Dermatol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, Melanoma, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        In-transit metastasis (ITM) is a unique manifestation of intralymphatic tumor dissemination, characterized by the presence of melanoma cells between the primary lesion and the draining regional lymph node basin that is clinically associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we aimed to establish an experimental animal model of melanoma ITM, as research progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of suitable experimental models. We reproduced melanoma ITM in a mouse hind limb by transplanting melanoma cells into the footpad of a mouse with lymphedema (LE). The tumor cells at the ITM site were highly proliferative, and mice with ITMs were more likely than control mice to develop distant lymph node and lung metastases. Peritumoral lymphatic vessels and tumor-associated blood vessels were increased in the primary tumor site of the LE mice. Our established ITM melanoma mouse model enabled us to clarify the molecular determinants and pathophysiology of ITM. This ITM model is also comparable to the unfavorable clinical behavior of melanoma ITM in humans and, moreover, underlined the importance of lymphangiogenic factors in the tumor dissemination through the lymphatic system.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 6 September 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.274.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22951727
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10501
      1. Author :
        Ragas, X.; Sanchez-Garcia, D.; Ruiz-Gonzalez, R.; Dai, T.; Agut, M.; Hamblin, M. R.; Nonell, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Med Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Animals; Bacterial Infections/*drug therapy; Burns/drug therapy/microbiology; Candida/drug effects; Cations; Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects; Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects; Male; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; *Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Porphyrins/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Solubility; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Structure-Activity Relationship
      12. Abstract :
        Structures of typical photosensitizers used in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy are based on porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and phenothiazinium salts, with cationic charges at physiological pH values. However, derivatives of the porphycene macrocycle (a structural isomer of porphyrin) have barely been investigated as antimicrobial agents. Therefore, we report the synthesis of the first tricationic water-soluble porphycene and its basic photochemical properties. We successfully tested it for in vitro photoinactivation of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as a fungal species (Candida) in a drug-dose and light-dose dependent manner. We also used the cationic porphycene in vivo to treat an infection model comprising mouse third degree burns infected with a bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. There was a 2.6-log(10) reduction (p < 0.001) of the bacterial bioluminescence for the PDT-treated group after irradiation with 180 J.cm(-2) of red light.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20936792
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10555
      1. Author :
        Ragas, X.; Sanchez-Garcia, D.; Ruiz-Gonzalez, R.; Dai, T.; Agut, M.; Hamblin, M. R.; Nonell, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Med Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Animals; Bacterial Infections/*drug therapy; Burns/drug therapy/microbiology; Candida/drug effects; Cations; Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects; Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects; Male; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; *Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Porphyrins/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Solubility; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Structure-Activity Relationship
      12. Abstract :
        Structures of typical photosensitizers used in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy are based on porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and phenothiazinium salts, with cationic charges at physiological pH values. However, derivatives of the porphycene macrocycle (a structural isomer of porphyrin) have barely been investigated as antimicrobial agents. Therefore, we report the synthesis of the first tricationic water-soluble porphycene and its basic photochemical properties. We successfully tested it for in vitro photoinactivation of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as a fungal species (Candida) in a drug-dose and light-dose dependent manner. We also used the cationic porphycene in vivo to treat an infection model comprising mouse third degree burns infected with a bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. There was a 2.6-log(10) reduction (p < 0.001) of the bacterial bioluminescence for the PDT-treated group after irradiation with 180 J.cm(-2) of red light.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20936792
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10556
      1. Author :
        Yun, M.; Pan, S.; Jiang, S. N.; Nguyen, V. H.; Park, S. H.; Jung, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Min, J. J.; Choy, H. E.; Hong, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Biological Therapy/*methods; Colonic Neoplasms/chemistry/*therapy; Disease Models, Animal; Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional; Male; Mass Spectrometry; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Proteome/analysis; Salmonella typhimurium/*growth & development/*pathogenicity
      12. Abstract :
        The use of bacteria has contributed to recent advances in targeted cancer therapy especially for its tumor-specific accumulation and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the molecular events following bacterial therapy using an attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium defective in ppGpp synthesis (DeltappGpp), by analyzing those proteins differentially expressed in tumor tissues from treated and untreated mice. CT26 murine colon cancer cells were implanted in BALB/c mice and allowed to form tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with the attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium. Tumor tissues were analyzed by 2D-PAGE. Fourteen differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. The analysis revealed that cytoskeletal components, including vimentin, drebrin-like protein, and tropomyosin-alpha 3, were decreased while serum proteins related to heme or iron metabolism, including transferrin, hemopexin, and haptoglobin were increased. Subsequent studies revealed that the decrease in cytoskeletal components occurred at the transcriptional level and that the increase in heme and iron metabolism proteins occurred in liver. Most interestingly, the same pattern of increased expression of transferrin, hemopexin, and haptoglobin was observed following radiotherapy at the dosage of 14 Gy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22752915
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10561
      1. Author :
        Zhuang, H.; Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Qiu, F.; Gan, Z.; Cheng, W.; Zhang, J.; Guan, S.; Tang, B.; Huang, Q.; Wu, X.; Huang, X.; Hu, Q.; Lu, M.; Hua, Z. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Mol Med (Berl)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Many cancer cell types are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. Here, we examined whether HSP70 suppression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) sensitized non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms. We demonstrated that HSP70 suppression by siRNA sensitized NSCLC cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulating the expressions of death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5) through activating NF-kappaB, JNK, and, subsequently, p53, consequently significantly amplifying TRAIL-mediated caspase-8 processing and activity, cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c, and cell death. Consistently, the pro-apoptotic proteins Bad and Bax were upregulated, while the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was downregulated. The luciferase activity of the DR4 promoter was blocked by a NF-kappaB pathway inhibitor BAY11-7082, suggesting that NF-kappaB activation plays an important role in the transcriptional upregulation of DR4. Additionally, HSP70 suppression inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK, AKT, and PKC, thereby downregulating c-FLIP-L. A549 xenografts in mice receiving HSP70 siRNA showed TRAIL-induced cell death and increased DR4/DR5 levels and reduced tumor growth. The combination of psiHSP70 gene therapy with TRAIL also significantly increased the survival benefits induced by TRAIL therapy alone. Interestingly, HSP27 siRNA and TRAIL together could not suppress tumor growth or prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice significantly, although the combination could efficiently induce the apoptosis of A549 cells in vitro. Our findings suggest that HSP70 suppression or downregulation might be promising to overcome TRAIL resistance in cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22948392
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10526
      1. Author :
        Bernthal, N. M.; Pribaz, J. R.; Stavrakis, A. I.; Billi, F.; Cho, J. S.; Ramos, R. I.; Francis, K. P.; Iwakura, Y.; Miller, L. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Orthop Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Animals; Arthroplasty; Biofilms/growth & development; Bone Wires/microbiology; Interleukin-1beta/*metabolism; Male; Mice; Mice, Congenic; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/metabolism; Neutrophil Infiltration; Prosthesis-Related Infections/*immunology/metabolism; Staphylococcal Infections/*immunology/metabolism; Staphylococcus aureus; Toll-Like Receptor 2/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        MyD88 is an adapter molecule that is used by both IL-1R and TLR family members to initiate downstream signaling and promote immune responses. Given that IL-1beta is induced after Staphylococcus aureus infections and TLR2 is activated by S. aureus lipopeptides, we hypothesized that IL-1beta and TLR2 contribute to MyD88-dependent protective immune responses against post-arthroplasty S. aureus infections. To test this hypothesis, we used a mouse model of a post-arthroplasty S. aureus infection to compare the bacterial burden, biofilm formation and neutrophil recruitment in IL-1beta-deficient, TLR2-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice. By using in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we found that the bacterial burden in IL-1beta-deficient mice was 26-fold higher at 1 day after infection and remained 3- to 10-fold greater than wt mice through day 42. In contrast, the bacterial burden in TLR2-deficient mice did not differ from wt mice. In addition, implants harvested from IL-1beta-deficient mice had more biofilm formation and 14-fold higher adherent bacteria compared with those from wt mice. Finally, IL-1beta-deficient mice had approximately 50% decreased neutrophil recruitment to the infected postoperative joints than wt mice. Taken together, these findings suggest a mechanism by which IL-1beta induces neutrophil recruitment to help control the bacterial burden and the ensuing biofilm formation in a post-surgical joint.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21445990
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10411
      1. Author :
        Hosman, A. H.; Bulstra, S. K.; Sjollema, J.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Neut, D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Orthop Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Wear of metal-on-metal (cobalt-chromium, Co-Cr particles) and metal-on-polyethylene (ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, UHMWPE particles) bearing surfaces in hip prostheses is a major problem in orthopedics. This study aimed to compare the influence of Co-Cr and UHMWPE particles on the persistence of infection. Bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus Xen36 were injected in air pouches prepared in subcutaneous tissue of immuno-competent BALB/c mice (control), as a model for the joint space, in the absence or presence of Co-Cr or UHMWPE particles. Bioluminescence was monitored longitudinally up to 21 days, corrected for absorption and reflection by the particles and expressed relative to the bioluminescence found in the presence of staphylococci only. After termination, air pouch fluid and air pouch membrane were cultured and histologically analyzed. Bioluminescence was initially lower in mice exposed to UHMWPE particles with staphylococci than in mice injected with staphylococci only, possibly because UHMWPE particles initially stimulated a higher macrophage presence in murine air pouch membranes. For mice exposed to Co-Cr particles with staphylococci, bioluminescence was observed to be higher in two out of six animals compared to the presence of staphylococci alone. In the majority of mice, infection risk in the absence or presence of Co-Cr and UHMWPE particles appeared similar, assuming that the longevity of an elevated bioluminescence is indicative of a higher infection risk. However, the presence of Co-Cr particles yielded a higher bioluminescence in two out of six mice, possibly because the macrophage degradative function was hampered by the presence of Co-Cr particles. (c) 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21866572
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10409
      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Mol, I. M.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; Van Driel, P. B.; Xie, B.; Baatenburg de Jong, R. J.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        105
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/*pathology/surgery; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Humans; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mouth Neoplasms/*pathology/surgery; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; *Surgery, Computer-Assisted
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence optical imaging is a promising technique to assess the tumor margins during cancer surgery. This technique requires targeting by specific fluorescence agents to differentiate tumor from normal surrounding tissue. We assessed the feasibility of cancer detection using NIR fluorescence agents that target either alphavbeta3 integrins or the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in an orthotopic mouse model of oral cancer. METHODS: Binding of the integrin-targeted agent to tumor cells was assessed in vitro. Oral cancer was induced in 6 BALB/c nu/nu mice by submucosal inoculation of human OSC19-luc cells into the tongue. Tumor growth was followed with bioluminescence imaging. A combination of agents targeting integrins or EPR effect was injected followed by fluorescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo after resection of the tongues. RESULTS: Oral cancer was clearly demarcated in vitro; in vivo; and on histological analysis with sufficient tumor-to-background ratios of the contrast agents. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility of optical imaging of oral squamous cell carcinoma based on targeting of alphavbeta3 integrins and the EPR effect. Once these NIR fluorescence agents become available for clinical testing, optical image-guided surgery could reduce residual disease after oral cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21952950
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 28
      15. Serial :
        10368
      1. Author :
        Fink, D.; Romanowski, K.; Valuckaite, V.; Babrowski, T.; Kim, M.; Matthews, J. B.; Liu, D.; Zaborina, O.; Alverdy, J. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Trauma
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        71
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        1575-82
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen41, Xen 41, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen41, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: : Experimental models of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR) injury are invariably performed in mice harboring their normal commensal flora, even though multiple IIR events occur in humans during prolonged intensive care confinement when they are colonized by a highly pathogenic hospital flora. The aims of this study were to determine whether the presence of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the distal intestine potentiates the lethality of mice exposed to IIR and to determine what role any in vivo virulence activation plays in the observed mortality. METHODS: : Seven- to 9-week-old C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 15 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) followed by direct intestinal inoculation of 1.0 x 10 colony-forming unit of P. aeruginosa PAO1 into the ileum and observed for mortality. Reiterative studies were performed in separate groups of mice to evaluate both the migration/dissemination pattern and in vivo virulence activation of intestinally inoculated strains using live photon camera imaging of both a constitutive bioluminescent P. aeruginosa PAO1 derivative XEN41 and an inducible reporter derivative of PAO1, the PAO1/lecA:luxCDABE that conditionally expresses the quorum sensing-dependent epithelial disrupting virulence protein PA 1 Lectin (PA-IL). RESULTS: : Mice exposed to 15 minutes of SMAO and reperfusion with intestinal inoculation of P. aeruginosa had a significantly increased mortality rate (p < 0.001) of 100% compared with <10% for sham-operated mice intestinally inoculated with P. aeruginosa without SMAO and IIR alone (<50%). Migration/dissemination patterns of P. aeruginosa in mice subjected to IIR demonstrated proximal migration of distally injected strains and translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney. A key role for in vivo virulence expression of the barrier disrupting adhesin PA-IL during IIR was established since its expression was enhanced during IR and mutant strains lacking PA-IL displayed attenuated mortality. CONCLUSIONS: : The presence of intestinal P. aeruginosa potentiates the lethal effect of IIR in mice in part due to in vivo virulence activation of its epithelial barrier disrupting protein PA-IL.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22002612
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10423
      1. Author :
        Penna, F. J.; Chow, J. S.; Minnillo, B. J.; Passerotti, C. C.; Barnewolt, C. E.; Treves, S. T.; Fahey, F. H.; Dunning, P. S.; Freilich, D. A.; Retik, A. B.; Nguyen, H. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Urol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        185
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Diagnostic Imaging; Disease Models, Animal; Fluorescence; *Kidney Pelvis; Mice; Ureteral Obstruction/*diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: Radiological imaging is the mainstay of diagnosing ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Current established radiological modalities can potentially differentiate the varying degrees of obstruction but they are limited in functionality, applicability and/or comprehensiveness. Of particular concern is that some tests require radiation, which has long-term consequences, especially in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the novel use of Genhance 680 dynamic fluorescence imaging to assess ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 20 mice that underwent partial or complete unilateral ureteral obstruction. Ultrasound, mercaptoacetyltriglycine renography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging were performed. RESULTS: Our model of partial and complete obstruction could be distinguished by ultrasound, mercaptoacetyltriglycine renography and magnetic resonance imaging, and was confirmed by histological analysis. Using fluorescence imaging distinct vascular and urinary parameters were identified in the partial and complete obstruction groups compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Fluorescence imaging is a feasible alternative radiological imaging modality to diagnose ureteropelvic junction obstruction. It provides continuous, detailed imaging without the risk of radiation exposure.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21511294
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 14
      15. Serial :
        10473
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