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      1. Author :
        Cabral, Horacio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of controlled release: official journal of the Controlled Release Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        121
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Hela Cells; HeLa-luc; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Micelles; Neoplasms; Organoplatinum Compounds; Platinum; Polymers; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Polymeric micelles are promising nanocarriers, which might enhance the efficacy of antitumor drugs. Herein, polymeric micelles incorporating dichloro(1,2-diamino-cyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt), the oxaliplatin parent complex, were prepared through the polymer-metal complex formation of DACHPt with poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(glutamic acid) [PEG-b-P(Glu)] block copolymer having different lengths of the poly(glutamic acid) block [p(Glu): 20, 40, and 70 U]. The resulting micelles were studied with the aim of optimizing the system's biological performance. DACHPt-loaded micelles (DACHPt/m) were approximately 40 nm in diameter and had a narrow size distribution. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor activity experiments (CDF1 mice bearing the murine colon adenocarcinoma C-26 inoculated subcutaneously) showed 20-fold greater accumulation of DACHPt/m at the tumor site than free oxaliplatin to achieve substantially higher antitumor efficacy. Moreover, the micelles prepared from PEG-b-P(Glu) with 20 U of P(Glu) exhibited the lowest non-specific accumulation in the liver and spleen to critically reduce non-specific accumulation, resulting in higher specificity to solid tumors. The antitumor effect of DACHPt/m was also evaluated on multiple metastases generated from intraperitoneally injected bioluminescent HeLa (HeLa-Luc) cells. The in vivo bioluminescent data indicated that DACHPt/m decreased the signal 10-to 50-fold compared to the control indicating a very strong antitumor activity. These results suggest that DACHPt/m could be an outstanding drug delivery system for oxaliplatin in the treatment of solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17628162
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9007
      1. Author :
        Cirstoiu-Hapca, A; Buchegger, F; Lange, N; Bossy, L; Gurny, R; Delie, F
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of controlled release: official journal of the Controlled Release Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        144
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal; Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers; Female; Humans; Mice; Nanoparticles; Ovarian Neoplasms; Paclitaxel; Receptor, erbB-2; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Tissue Distribution; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        The benefit of polymeric immuno-nanoparticles (NPs-Tx-HER), consisting of paclitaxel (Tx)-loaded nanoparticles coated with anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (Herceptin, trastuzumab), in cancer treatment was assessed in a disseminated xenograft ovarian cancer model induced by intraperitoneal inoculation of SKOV-3 cells overexpressing HER2 antigens. The study was focused on the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and biodistribution of NPs-Tx-HER compared to other Tx formulations. The therapeutic efficacy was determined by two methods: bioluminescence imaging and survival rate. The treatment regimen consisted in an initial dose of 20mg/kg Tx administered as 10mg/kg intravenously (IV) and 10mg/kg intraperitonealy (IP), followed by five alternative IP and IV injections of 10mg/kg Tx every 3 days. The bioluminescence study has clearly shown the superior anti-tumor activity of NPs-Tx-HER compared to free Tx. As a confirmation of these results, a significantly longer survival of mice was observed for NPs-Tx-HER treatment compared to free Tx, Tx-loaded nanoparticles coated with an irrelevant mAb (Mabthera, rituximab) or Herceptin alone, indicating the potential of immuno-nanoparticles in cancer treatment. The biodistribution pattern of Tx was assessed on healthy and tumor bearing mice after IV or IP administration. An equivalent biodistribution profile was observed in healthy mice for Tx encapsulated either in uncoated nanoparticles (NPs-Tx) or in NPs-Tx-HER. No significant difference in Tx biodistribution was observed after IV or IP injection, except for a lower accumulation in the lungs when NPs were administered by IP. Encapsulated Tx accumulated in the organs of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES) such as the liver and spleen, whereas free Tx had a non-specific distribution in all tested organs. Compared to free Tx, the single dose injection (IV or IP) of encapsulated Tx in mice bearing tumors induced a higher tumor accumulation. However, no difference in overall tumor accumulation between NPs-Tx-HER and NPs-Tx was observed. In conclusion, the encapsulation of Tx into NPs-Tx-HER immuno-nanoparticles resulted in an improved efficacy of drug in the treatment of disseminated ovarian cancer overexpressing HER2 receptors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219607
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9012
      1. Author :
        Virna Cortez-Retamozo, Filip K. Swirski, Peter Waterman, Hushan Yuan, Jose Luiz Figueiredo, Andita P. Newton, Rabi Upadhyay, Claudio Vinegoni, Rainer Kohler, Joseph Blois, Adam Smith, Matthias Nahrendorf, Lee Josephson, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Clinical Investigation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        118
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; in vivo imaging; ProSense; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that degrade and remodel tissue extracellular matrix through production of proteolytic enzymes, release of proinflammatory factors to initiate and propagate inflammatory responses, and direct activation of mucus secretion and smooth muscle cell constriction. Thus, eosinophils are central effector cells during allergic airway inflammation and an important clinical therapeutic target. Here we describe the use of an injectable MMP-targeted optical sensor that specifically and quantitatively resolves eosinophil activity in the lungs of mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation. Through the use of real-time molecular imaging methods, we report the visualization of eosinophil responses in vivo and at different scales. Eosinophil responses were seen at single-cell resolution in conducting airways using near-infrared fluorescence fiberoptic bronchoscopy, in lung parenchyma using intravital microscopy, and in the whole body using fluorescence-mediated molecular tomography. Using these real-time imaging methods, we confirmed the immunosuppressive effects of the glucocorticoid drug dexamethasone in the mouse model of allergic airway inflammation and identified a viridin-derived prodrug that potently inhibited the accumulation and enzyme activity of eosinophils in the lungs. The combination of sensitive enzyme-targeted sensors with noninvasive molecular imaging approaches permitted evaluation of airway inflammation severity and was used as a model to rapidly screen for new drug effects. Both fluorescence-mediated tomography and fiberoptic bronchoscopy techniques have the potential to be translated into the clinic.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2579705/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4536
      1. Author :
        Klohs J, Baeva N, Steinbrink J, Bourayou R, Boettcher C, Royl G, Megow D, Dirnagl U, Priller J and Wunder A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Neuroscience
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense; in vivo imaging; matrix metalloproteinases; stroke
      12. Abstract :
        Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia. In this study, we explored whether MMP activity can be visualized by noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging using an MMP-activatable probe in a mouse model of stroke. C57Bl6 mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) or sham operation. Noninvasive NIRF imaging was performed 24 h after probe injection, and target-to-background ratios (TBRs) between the two hemispheres were determined. TBRs were significantly higher in MCAO mice injected with the MMP-activatable probe than in sham-operated mice and in MCAO mice that were injected with the nonactivatable probe as controls. Treatment with an MMP inhibitor resulted in significantly lower TBRs and lesion volumes compared to injection of vehicle. To test the contribution of MMP-9 to the fluorescence signal, MMP9-deficient (MMP9(-/-)) mice and wild-type controls were subjected to MCAO of different durations to attain comparable lesion volumes. TBRs were significantly lower in MMP9(-/-) mice, suggesting a substantial contribution of MMP-9 activity to the signal. Our study shows that MMP activity after cerebral ischemia can be imaged noninvasively with NIRF using an MMP-activatable probe, which might be a useful tool to study MMP activity in the pathophysiology of the disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19417756
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4547
      1. Author :
        Kozloff KM, Volakis LI, Marini JC and Caird MS
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; bone; OsteoSense; FRFP; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Bisphosphonate use has expanded beyond traditional applications to include treatment of a variety of low-bone-mass conditions. Complications associated with long-term bisphosphonate treatment have been noted, generating a critical need for information describing the local bisphosphonate-cell interactions responsible for these observations. This study demonstrates that a fluorescent bisphosphonate analogue, far-red fluorescent pamidronate (FRFP), is an accurate biomarker of bisphosphonate deposition and retention in vivo and can be used to monitor site-specific local drug concentration. In vitro, FRFP is competitively inhibited from the surface of homogenized rat cortical bone by traditional bisphosphonates. In vivo, FRFP delivery to the skeleton is rapid, with fluorescence linearly correlated with bone surface area. Limb fluorescence increases linearly with injected dose of FRFP; injected FRFP does not interfere with binding of standard bisphosphonates at the doses used in this study. Long-term FRFP retention studies demonstrated that FRFP fluorescence decreases in conditions of normal bone turnover, whereas fluorescence was retained in conditions of reduced bone turnover, demonstrating preservation of local FRFP concentration. In the mandible, FRFP localized to the alveolar bone and bone surrounding the periodontal ligament and molar roots, consistent with findings of osteonecrosis of the jaw. These findings support a role for FRFP as an effective in vivo marker for bisphosphonate site-specific deposition, turnover, and long-term retention in the skeleton.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20200982
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4527
      1. Author :
        Kenneth M Kozloff, Ralph Weissleder and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Bone and Mineral Research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        22
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; OsteoSense; ProSense bone mineralization; bone turnover markers; molecular imaging; bisphosphonates; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Abstract: FRFP binds to mineral at osteoblastic, osteoclastic, and quiescent surfaces, with accumulation likely modulated by vascular delivery. In vivo visualization and quantification of binding can be accomplished noninvasively in animal models through optical tomographic imaging.

        Introduction: The development of near-infrared optical markers as reporters of bone metabolism will be useful for early diagnosis of disease. Bisphosphonates bind differentially to osteoblastic and osteoclastic surfaces depending on choice of side-chain and dose, and fluorescently tagged bisphosphonates provide a convenient way to visualize these sites. This study examines the ability of a fluorescently labeled pamidronate imaging probe to bind to regions of bone formation and resorption in vivo.

        Materials and Methods: In vitro binding of a far-red fluorescent pamidronate (FRFP) to mineral was assessed using intact and demineralized dentine slices. In vivo, FRFP binding was studied in three models: developing neonatal mouse, bone healing after injury, and metastasis-induced osteolysis and fracture. 3D fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) imaging was used to visualize signal deep within the body.

        Results: FRFP binding to bone depends on the quantity of mineral present and can be liberated from the bone during decalcification. In vivo, FRFP binds to surfaces of actively forming bone, as assessed by alkaline phosphatase staining, surfaces undergoing active resorption, as noted by scalloped bone border and presence of osteoclasts, and to quiescent surfaces not involved in formation or resorption. Binding is likely modulated by vascular delivery of the imaging agent to the exposed mineral surface and total quantity of surface exposed.FMT imaging is capable of visualizing regions of bone formation because of a large volume of labeled surface, but like radiolabeled bone scans, cannot discriminate pure osteolysis caused by metastasis.

        Conclusions: FRFP may function as a local biomarker of bisphosphonate deposition to assess interplay between drug and cellular environment or may be combined with other imaging agents or fluorescent cells for the noninvasive assessment of local bone metabolism in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1359/jbmr.070504/references?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Ajournal&rft.genre=article&rft.jtitle=Nat%20Med&rft.atitle=Shedding%20light%20onto%20live%20molecular%20targets&rft.volume=9&rf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4530
      1. Author :
        Marcella A. Calfon, Claudio Vinegoni, Vasilis Ntziachristos and Farouc A. Jaffer
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Biomedical Optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; Cat K FAST; Cat B FAST; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.
      13. URL :
        http://spiedl.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=JBOPFO000015000001011107000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes&ref=no
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4556
      1. Author :
        Kuo, Chaincy; Coquoz, Olivier; Troy, Tamara L; Xu, Heng; Rice, Brad W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Luminescent Proteins; Male; Mice; Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Whole Body Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A new method is described for obtaining a 3-D reconstruction of a bioluminescent light source distribution inside a living animal subject, from multispectral images of the surface light emission acquired on charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The method uses the 3-D surface topography of the animal, which is obtained from a structured light illumination technique. The forward model of photon transport is based on the diffusion approximation in homogeneous tissue with a local planar boundary approximation for each mesh element, allowing rapid calculation of the forward Green's function kernel. Absorption and scattering properties of tissue are measured a priori as input to the algorithm. By using multispectral images, 3-D reconstructions of luminescent sources can be derived from images acquired from only a single view. As a demonstration, the reconstruction technique is applied to determine the location and brightness of a source embedded in a homogeneous phantom subject in the shape of a mouse. The technique is then evaluated with real mouse models in which calibrated sources are implanted at known locations within living tissue. Finally, reconstructions are demonstrated in a PC3M-luc (prostate tumor line) metastatic tumor model in nude mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17477722
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8968
      1. Author :
        Rice, B W; Cable, M D; Nelson, M B
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescent Dyes; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; Pneumonia
      12. Abstract :
        In vivo imaging of cells tagged with light-emitting probes, such as firefly luciferase or fluorescent proteins, is a powerful technology that enables a wide range of biological studies in small research animals. Reporters with emission in the red to infrared (>600 nm) are preferred due to the low absorption in tissue at these wavelengths. Modeling of photon diffusion through tissue indicates that bioluminescent cell counts as low as a few hundred can be detected subcutaneously, while approximately 10(6) cells are required to detect signals at approximately 2 cm depth in tissue. Signal-to-noise estimates show that cooled back-thinned integrating charge coupled devices (CCDs) are preferred to image-intensified CCDs for this application, mainly due to their high quantum efficiency (approximately 85%) at wavelengths >600 nm where tissue absorption is low. Instrumentation for in vivo imaging developed at Xenogen is described and several examples of images of mice with bioluminescent cells are presented.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11728202
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8984
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