1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Headers act as filters

  • Records
      1. Author :
        Xing, H. R.; Zhang, Q.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Methods Mol Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        872
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Female; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neovascularization, Pathologic/drug therapy/*pathology
      12. Abstract :
        In vivo angiogenesis assays provide more physiologically relevant information about tumor vascularization than in vitro studies because they take the complex interactions among cancer cells, endothelial cells, mural cells, and tumor stroma into consideration. Traditional microscopic assessment of vascular density conducted by immunostaining of tissue sections or by lectin angiogram visualization of tumor vessels is invasive and requires the sacrifice of tumor-bearing animals. Therefore, it prohibits longitudinal time-course observation in a single animal and requires a large number of animals at each time point to derive statistically-meaningful observations. Additionally, heterogenous behavior among different tumors will inevitably introduce individual biological variance that may obscure reliable interpretation of the results. While various artificial in vivo angiogenesis assays, such as the Matrigel implant assay, chick chorioallatoic membrane assay, and dorsal skin fold chamber assay have been developed and employed to more directly observe the progression of physiological angiogenesis, they can not appropriately assess tumor angiogenic progression or tumor vascular regression in response to therapeutic intervention. Here, we describe a noninvasive method and a detailed protocol that we have developed and optimized using the Olympus OV-100 in vivo imaging system for real-time high-resolution visualization and assessment of tumor angiogenesis and vascular response to anticancer therapies in live animals. We show that using this approach, tumor vessels can be monitored longitudinally through the whole vasculogenesis and angiogenesis process in the same mouse. Further, morphologic changes of the same vessel prior to and after drug treatments can be captured with microscopic high resolution. Moreover, the multichannel co-imaging capability of the OV-100 allows us to analyze and compare tumor vessel permeability before and after antiangiogenesis therapy by employing a near-infrared blood pool reagent, or by visualizing improved cytotoxic drug delivery upon tumor vessel normalization by using a fluorophore tagged drug. This noninvasive method can be readily applied to orthotopically transplanted breast cancer models as well as to subcutaneously-transplanted tumor models.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700407
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10443
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Francis, K. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Methods in Molecular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        431
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware, Xen29, Animals, Bacteria/chemistry/ genetics, Bacterial Infections/diagnosis/ microbiology, Biofilms/ growth & development, Diagnostic Imaging/methods, Luminescent Measurements/ methods IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        Whole body biophotonic imaging (BPI) is a technique that has contributed significantly to the way researchers study bacterial pathogens and develop pre-clinical treatments to combat their ensuing infections in vivo. Not only does this approach allow disease profiles and drug efficacy studies to be conducted non-destructively in live animals over the entire course of the disease, but in many cases, it enables investigators to observe disease profiles that could otherwise easily be missed using conventional methodologies. The principles of this technique are that bacterial pathogens engineered to express bioluminescence (visible light) can be readily monitored from outside of the living animal using specialized low-light imaging equipment, enabling their movement, expansion and treatment to be seen completely non-invasively. Moreover, because the same group of animals can be imaged at each time-point throughout the study, the overall number of animals used is dramatically reduced, saving lives, time, and money. Also, as each animal acts as its own control over time, the issues associated with animal-to-animal variation are circumvented, thus improving the quality of the biostatistical data generated. The ability to monitor infections in vivo in a longitudinal fashion is especially appealing to assess chronic infections such as those involving implanted devices. Typically, bacteria grow as biofilms on these foreign bodies and are reputably difficult to monitor with conventional methods. Because of the non-destructive and non-invasive nature of BPI, the procedure can be performed repeatedly in the same animal, allowing the biofilm to be studied in situ without detachment or disturbance. This ability not only allows unique patterns of disease relapse to be seen following termination of antibiotic therapy but also in vivo resistance development during prolonged treatment, both of which are common occurrences with device-related infections. This chapter describes the bioluminescent engineering of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and overviews their use in device-associated infections in several anatomical sites in a variety of animal models.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18287760
      14. Call Number :
        139321
      15. Serial :
        5568
      1. Author :
        Takaba, J.; Mishima, Y.; Hatake, K.; Kasahara, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Mediators of Inflammation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2010
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        bone marrow cells; Cancer; cell labeling; in vitro; in vivo imaging; Olympus IV-100; tail vein injection; VivoTag 750
      12. Abstract :
        Mucosal damage is a common side effect of many cancer treatments, especially radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy, which often induce bone marrow (BM) suppression. We observed that acetic acid- (AA-) induced mucosal damage in the colon of mice was worsened by simultaneous treatment with irradiation or 5-FU. However, irradiation 14 days prior to the AA treatment augmented the recovery from mucosal damage, suggesting that the recovery from BM suppression had an advantageous effect on the mucosal repair. In addition, BM transplantation also augmented the recovery from AA-induced mucosal damage. We further confirmed that transplanted BM-derived cells, particularly F4/80+Gr1+ “inflammatory” monocytes (Subset 1), accumulated in the damaged mucosal area in the early healing phase, and both of Subset 1 and F4/80+Gr1- “resident” monocytes (Subset 2) accumulated in this area in later phases. Our results suggest that monocytes/macrophages contribute to the mucosal recovery and regeneration following mucosal damage by anticancer drug therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21274263
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8445
      15. Serial :
        4808
      1. Author :
        Brand, A. M.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Dicks, L. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Lett Appl Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        51
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Animals; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Nisin/*pharmacology; Peritoneal Cavity/*microbiology; Staphylococcal Infections/*prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/*drug effects/growth & development
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: To determine the ability of nisin F to control systematic infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus, using C57BL/6 mice as a model. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twelve mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1 x 10(8) viable cells of Staph. aureus Xen 36 containing the modified Photorhabdus luminescence luxABCDE operon on plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001. After 4 h, six mice were intraperitoneally injected with 640 arbitrary units (AU) nisin F, and six were injected with sterile saline. Six mice, not infected with Staph. aureus, were treated with nisin F, and six not infected were left untreated. The viability of Staph. aureus Xen 36 was monitored over 48 h by recording photon emission levels. Nisin F suppressed Staph. aureus for 15 min in vivo. No abnormalities were recorded in blood analyses and internal organs of mice treated with nisin F. CONCLUSIONS: Nisin F suppressed the growth of Staph. aureus in the peritoneal cavity for at least 15 min. Re-emergence of Staph. aureus bioluminescence over the next 44 h suggests that nisin F was inactivated, most probably by proteolytic enzymes. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: A single dosage of nisin F administered in the peritoneal cavity controlled the growth of Staph. aureus for at least 15 min in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21029139
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10410
      1. Author :
        Dai, T.; Tegos, G. P.; Zhiyentayev, T.; Mylonakis, E.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Lasers Surg Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        42
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Administration, Cutaneous; Animals; Disease Models, Animal; Female; *Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Photobleaching; *Photochemotherapy; Polyethyleneimine/administration & dosage; Porphyrins/*administration & dosage; Radiation-Sensitizing Agents/*administration & dosage; Staphylococcal Skin Infections/etiology/pathology/*therapy; Wound Infection/microbiology/pathology/*therapy
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin infections are now known to be a common and important problem in the Unites States. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of MRSA infection in skin abrasion wounds using a mouse model. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: A mouse model of skin abrasion wound infected with MRSA was developed. Bioluminescent strain of MRSA, a derivative of ATCC 33591, was used to allow the real-time monitoring of the extent of infection in mouse wounds. PDT was performed with the combination of a polyethylenimine (PEI)-ce6 photosensitizer (PS) and non-coherent red light. In vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out to evaluate the effect of photobleaching of PS during PDT. RESULTS: In vivo fluorescence imaging of conjugate PEI-ce6 applied in mice indicated the photobleaching effect of the PS during PDT. PDT induced on average 2.7 log(10) of inactivation of MRSA as judged by loss of bioluminescence in mouse skin abrasion wounds and accelerated the wound healing on average by 8.6 days in comparison to the untreated infected wounds. Photobleaching of PS in the wound was overcome by adding the PS solution in aliquots. CONCLUSION: PDT may represent an alternative approach for the treatment of MRSA skin infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20077489
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10553
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Lasers in surgery and medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        39
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Infective Agents; Biofilms; Dental Pulp Cavity; Dental Pulp Diseases; Endodontics; Humans; Luminescence; Photochemotherapy; Polyethyleneimine; Porphyrins; Proteus Infections; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Pseudomonas Infections; Xen5; Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-micro fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. RESULTS Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (P<0.0005) than for either single treatment. CONCLUSIONS Bioluminescence imaging is an efficient way to monitor endodontic therapy. Antimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17066481
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9997
      1. Author :
        Lim, Ed; Modi, Kshitij D; Kim, Jaebeom
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of visualized experiments: JoVE
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        26
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2; Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Nude
      12. Abstract :
        4T1 mouse mammary tumor cells can be implanted sub-cutaneously in nu/nu mice to form palpable tumors in 15 to 20 days. This xenograft tumor model system is valuable for the pre-clinical in vivo evaluation of putative antitumor compounds. The 4T1 cell line has been engineered to constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc2). When mice carrying 4T1-luc2 tumors are injected with Luciferin the tumors emit a visual light signal that can be monitored using a sensitive optical imaging system like the IVIS Spectrum. The photon flux from the tumor is proportional to the number of light emitting cells and the signal can be measured to monitor tumor growth and development. IVIS is calibrated to enable absolute quantitation of the bioluminescent signal and longitudinal studies can be performed over many months and over several orders of signal magnitude without compromising the quantitative result. Tumor growth can be monitored for several days by bioluminescence before the tumor size becomes palpable or measurable by traditional physical means. This rapid monitoring can provide insight into early events in tumor development or lead to shorter experimental procedures. Tumor cell death and necrosis due to hypoxia or drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This cell death might not be accompanied by a reduction in tumor size as measured by physical means. The ability to see early events in tumor necrosis has significant impact on the selection and development of therapeutic agents. Quantitative imaging of tumor growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation and accelerates the experimental process to generate results.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19404236
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8941
      1. Author :
        Wallis de Vries BM, van Dam GM, Tio RA, Hillebrands JL, Slart RH and Zeebregts CJ
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Vascular Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; MMPSense; atherosclerotic carotid plaque
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that plaque vulnerability, rather than the degree of stenosis, is important in predicting the occurrence of subsequent cerebral ischemic events in patients with carotid artery stenosis. The many imaging modalities currently available have different properties with regard to the visualization of the extent of vulnerability in carotid plaque formation.

        METHODS: Original published studies were identified using the MEDLINE database (January 1966 to March 2008). Manual cross-referencing was also performed.

        RESULTS: There is no single imaging modality that can produce definitive information about the state of vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque. Each has its own specific drawbacks, which may be the use of ionizing radiation or nephrotoxic contrast agents, an invasive character, low patient tolerability, or simply the paucity of information obtained on plaque vulnerability. Functional molecular imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) and near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) do seem able accurately to visualize and even quantify features of plaque vulnerability and its pathophysiologic processes. Promising new techniques like near infra-red fluorescence imaging are being developed and may be beneficial in this field.

        CONCLUSION: There is a promising role for functional molecular imaging modalities like PET, SPECT, or NIRS related to improvement of selection criteria for carotid intervention, especially when combined with CT or MRI to add further anatomical details to molecular information. Further information will be needed to define whether and where this functional molecular imaging will fit into a clinical strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.jvascsurg.org/article/S0741-5214(08)01146-4/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4643