1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

431–440 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Thomas Reiner, Rainer H. Kohler, Chong Wee Liew, Jonathan Hill, Jason Gaglia, Rohit Kulkarni and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        21
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Metabolic Disorders
      11. Keywords :
        Beta-cells; GLP1-R; imaging; targeting; in vivo imaging; VivoTag; AngioSense; Diabetes
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to image and ultimately quantitate beta-cell mass in vivo will likely have far reaching implications in the study of diabetes biology, in the monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment, as well as for drug development. Here, using animal models, we report on the synthesis, characterization of, and intravital microscopic imaging properties of a near infrared fluorescent exendin-4 analogue with specificity for the GLP-1 receptor on beta cells (E4K12-Fl). The agent demonstrated sub-nanomolar EC50 binding concentrations, with high specificity and binding could be inhibited by GLP-1R agonists. Following intravenous administration to mice, pancreatic islets were readily distinguishable from exocrine pancreas, achieving target-to-background ratios within the pancreas of 6:1, as measured by intravital microscopy. Serial imaging revealed rapid accumulation kinetics (with initial signal within the islets detectable within 3 minutes and peak fluorescence within 20 minutes of injection) making this an ideal agent for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912453/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4561
      1. Author :
        Jason R. McCarthy, Purvish Patel, Ion Botnaru, Pouneh Haghayeghi, Ralph Weissleder and Farouc A. Jaffer
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; thrombi; VivoTag
      12. Abstract :
        Thrombosis underlies numerous life-threatening cardiovascular syndromes. Development of thrombosis-specific molecular imaging agents to detect and monitor thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis in vivo could improve the diagnosis, risk stratification, and treatment of thrombosis syndromes. To this end, we have synthesized efficient multimodal nanoagents targeted to two different constituents of thrombi, namely, fibrin and activated factor XIII. These agents are targeted via the conjugation of peptide-targeting ligands to the surface of fluorescently labeled magnetic nanoparticles. As demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies, both nanoagents possess high affinities for thrombi, and enable mutimodal fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19456115
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4647
      1. Author :
        Asai, T.; Matsushita, S.; Kenjo, E.; Tsuzuku, T.; Yonenaga, N.; Koide, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Dewa, T.; Nango, M.; Maeda, N.; Kikuchi, H.; Oku, N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjug Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        22
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2; Base Sequence; Cell Line, Tumor; Cholesterol/metabolism; Ethylenediamines/*chemistry; Fibrosarcoma/metabolism/pathology; Gene Silencing; Humans; Injections, Intravenous; Liposomes/administration & dosage/chemical; synthesis/*chemistry/pharmacokinetics; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Molecular Imaging; Phosphoric Acid Esters/*chemistry; Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics/*metabolism; Spectrophotometry, Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        Dicetyl phosphate-tetraethylenepentamine (DCP-TEPA) conjugate was newly synthesized and formed into liposomes for efficient siRNA delivery. Formulation of DCP-TEPA-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) complexed with siRNA was examined by performing knockdown experiments using stable EGFP-transfected HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells and siRNA for GFP. An adequate amount of DCP-TEPA in TEPA-PCL and N/P ratio of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes were determined based on the knockdown efficiency. Then, the biodistribution of TEPA-PCL modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was examined in BALB/c mice. As a result, TEPA-PCL modified with PEG6000 avoided reticuloendothelial system uptake and showed long circulation in the bloodstream. On the other hand, PEGylation of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes caused dissociation of a portion of the siRNA from the liposomes. However, we found that the use of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA improved the interaction between TEPA-PCL and siRNA, which allowed PEGylation of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes without siRNA dissociation. In addition, TEPA-PCL complexed with cholesterol-conjugated siRNA showed potent knockdown efficiency in stable luciferase-transfected B16-F10 murine melanoma cells. Finally, the biodistribution of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA formulated in PEGylated TEPA-PCL was examined by performing near-infrared fluorescence imaging in Colon26 NL-17 murine carcinoma-bearing mice. Our results showed that tumor targeting with siRNA via systemic administration was achieved by using PEGylated TEPA-PCL combined with active targeting with Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly, a peptide used for targeting angiogenic endothelium.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21361311
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10347
      1. Author :
        Tafreshi, N. K.; Huang, X.; Moberg, V. E.; Barkey, N. M.; Sondak, V. K.; Tian, H.; Morse, D. L.; Vagner, J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjug Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        23
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc
      12. Abstract :
        The incidence of malignant melanoma is rising more rapidly than that of any other cancer in the United States. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is overexpressed in most human melanoma metastases, thus making it a promising target for imaging and therapy of melanomas. We have previously reported the development of a peptidomimetic ligand with high specificity and affinity for MC1R. Here, we have conjugated near-infrared fluorescent dyes to the C-terminus of this ligand via lysine-mercaptopropionic acid linkers to generate MC1R specific optical probes (MC1RL-800, 0.4 nM K(i); and MC1RL-Cy5, 0.3 nM K(i)). Internalization of the imaging probe was studied in vitro by fluorescence microscopy using engineered A375/MC1R cells and B16F10 cells with endogenous MC1R expression. The in vivo tumor targeting of MC1RL-800 was evaluated by intravenous injection of probe into nude mice bearing bilateral subcutaneous A375 xenograft tumors with low MC1R expression and engineered A375/MC1R tumors with high receptor expression. Melanotic B16F10 xenografts were also studied. Fluorescence imaging showed that the agent has higher uptake values in tumors with high expression compared to low (p < 0.05), demonstrating the effect of expression levels on image contrast-to-noise. In addition, tumor uptake was significantly blocked by coinjection of excess NDP-alpha-MSH peptide (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the MC1R-specific imaging probe developed in this study displays excellent potential for the intraoperative detection of regional node involvement and for margin detection during melanoma metastasis resection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23116461
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10535
      1. Author :
        Xing, Yifei; Lu, Xiaochun; Pua, Eric C; Zhong, Pei
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Biochemical and biophysical research communications
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        375
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic; Female; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplasm Metastasis; Ultrasonic Therapy
      12. Abstract :
        This study aims to assess the risk of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy on the incidence of distant metastases and to investigate its association with HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immunity in a murine melanoma (B16-F10) model. Tumor-bearing legs were amputated immediately after or 2 days following HIFU treatment to differentiate the contribution of the elicited anti-tumor immunity. In mice undergoing amputation immediately after mechanical, thermal, or no HIFU treatment, metastasis rates were comparable (18.8%, 13.3%, and 12.5%). In contrast, with a 2-day delay in amputation, the corresponding metastasis rates were 6.7%, 11.8%, and 40%, respectively. Animal survival rate was higher and CTL activity was enhanced in the HIFU treatment groups. Altogether, our results suggest that HIFU treatment does not increase the risk of distant metastasis. Instead, HIFU treatment can elicit an anti-tumor immune response that may be harnessed to improve the overall effectiveness and quality of cancer therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18727919
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8998
      1. Author :
        Wunder A and Klohs J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Basic Research in Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        103
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; atherosclerosis; bioluminescence imaging; fluorescence imaging; myocardial infarction; stroke; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Pathophysiological processes in the vascular system are the major cause of mortality and disease. Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory process in arterial walls, can lead to formation of plaques, whose rupture can lead to thrombus formation, obstruction of vessels (thrombosis), reduction of the blood flow (ischemia), cell death in the tissue fed by the occluded vessel, and depending on the affected vessel, to myocardial infarction or stroke. Imaging techniques enabling visualization of the biological processes involved in this scenario are therefore highly desirable. In recent years, a number of reporter agents and reporter systems have been developed to visualize these processes using different imaging modalities including nuclear imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. This article comprises a brief overview of optical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and bioluminescence imaging for the visualization of vascular pathophysiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18324374
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4649
      1. Author :
        Rahul A. Sheth, Marco Maricevich and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Atherosclerosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        212
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        Molecular imaging; Abdominal aortic aneurysm; Optical imaging; Pre-clinical; Endovascular imaging; Matrix metalloproteinase; in vivo imaging; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Objectives: We present a method to quantify the inflammatory processes that drive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development that may help predict the rate of growth and thus guide medical and surgical management. We use an in vivo optical molecular imaging approach to quantify protease activity within the walls of AAAs in a rodent model.

        Methods: AAAs were generated in mice by topical application of calcium chloride, followed by the administration of the MMP inhibitor doxycycline for 3 months. After this time period, an enzyme-activatable optical molecular imaging agent sensitive to MMP activity was administered, and MMP proteolytic activity was measured in vivo. Histology and in situ zymography were performed for validation. AAAs were also generated in rats, and MMP activity within the walls of the AAAs was also quantified endovascularly.

        Results: A dose-dependent response of AAA growth rate to doxycycline administration was demonstrated, with high doses of the drug resulting in nearly complete suppression of aneurysm formation. There was a direct relationship between the rate of aneurysmal growth and measured MMP activity, with a linear best-fit well approximating the relationship. We additionally performed endovascular imaging of AAAs in rats and demonstrated a similar suppression of intramural MMP activity following doxycycline administration.

        Conclusions: We present an in vivo evaluation of MMP activity within the walls of AAAs in rodents and show a direct, linear relationship between proteolytic activity and aneurysmal growth. We also illustrate that this functional imaging method can be performed endovascularly, demonstrating potential pre-clinical and clinical applications.
      13. URL :
        http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(10)00390-4/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4550
      1. Author :
        Luis Rodriguez-Menocal1, Yuntao Wei1, Si M. Pham, Melissa St-Pierre, Sen Li, Keith Webster, Pascal Goldschmidt-Clermont and Roberto I. Vazquez-Padron
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Atherosclerosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        209
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In-stent restenosis; Mouse; Stent; Animal model; in vivo imaging; MMPSense FAST; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Background and aims: In-stent restenosis (ISR) is the major complication that occurs after percutaneous coronary interventions to facilitate coronary revascularization. Herein we described a simple and cost-effective model, which reproduces important features of ISR in the mouse.

        Methods and results: Microvascular bare metal stents were successfully implanted in the abdominal aorta of atherosclerotic ApoE-null mice. Patency of implanted stents was interrogated using ultrasound biomicroscopy. Aortas were harvested at different time points after implantation and processed for histopathological analysis. Thrombus formation was histologically detected after 1 day. Leukocyte adherence and infiltration were evident after 7 days and decreased thereafter. Neointimal formation, neointimal thickness and luminal stenosis simultaneously increased up to 28 days after stent implantation. Using multichannel fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) for spatiotemporal resolution of MMP activities, we observed that MMP activity in the stented aorta of Apo-E null mice was 2-fold higher than that of wild-type mice. Finally, we compared neointimal formation in response to stenting in two genetically different mouse strains. In-stent neointimas in FVB/NJ mice were 2-fold thicker than in C57BL/6J mice (p=0.002).

        Conclusion: We have developed a model that can take advantage of the multiple genetic resources available for the mouse to study the mechanisms of in-stent restenosis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(09)00825-9/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4555
      1. Author :
        Evans, L.; Williams, A. S.; Hayes, A. J.; Jones, S. A.; Nowell, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Rheum
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        63
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Acrylamides/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Animals; Arthritis, Experimental/*drug therapy/metabolism/pathology; Cartilage/*metabolism/pathology; Fibroblasts/metabolism/pathology; Humans; Inflammation/metabolism/pathology; Leukocytes/*drug effects/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase/*antagonists & inhibitors; Piperidines/pharmacology/*therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: To assess the ability of pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) to regulate inflammation and degradative processes in inflammatory arthritis, using the small molecule inhibitor APO866 in human fibroblasts in vitro and in murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). METHODS: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to examine regulation of expression of metalloproteinases and chemokines in human fibroblasts. The role of PBEF was further examined using APO866 in mice with CIA, with effects on disease activity assessed using radiography, histology, in vivo imaging, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). RESULTS: In vitro activation of human fibroblasts with PBEF promoted expression of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), CCL2, and CXCL8, an effect inhibited by APO866. In mice with CIA, early intervention with APO866 inhibited synovial inflammation, including chemokine-directed leukocyte infiltration, and reduced a systemic marker of inflammation, serum hyaluronic acid. APO866 blockade led to reduced expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in joint extracts and to a reduction in a systemic marker of cartilage erosion, serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Radiologic images revealed that APO866 protected against bone erosion, while qPCR demonstrated inhibition of RANKL expression. In mice with established disease, APO866 reduced synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction, and halted bone erosion. In addition, APO866 reduced the activity of MMP-3, CCL2, and RANKL in vivo, and inhibited production of CCL2 and RANKL in synovial explants from arthritic mice, a result that was reversed with nicotinamide mononucleotide. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm PBEF to be an important regulator of inflammation, cartilage catabolism, and bone erosion, and highlight APO866 as a promising therapeutic agent for targeting PBEF activity in inflammatory arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21400478
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10460
      1. Author :
        Jeffrey D Peterson; Timothy P LaBranche; Kristine O Vasquez; Sylvie Kossodo; Michele Melton; Randall Rader; John T Listello; Mark A Abrams; Thomas P Misko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Research & Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        optical tomography; in vivo imaging; inflammation; Fluorescence molecular tomographic; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Introduction: Standard measurements used to assess murine models of rheumatoid arthritis, notably paw thickness and clinical score, do not align well with certain aspects of disease severity as assessed by histopathology. We tested the hypothesis that non-invasive optical tomographic imaging of molecular biomarkers of inflammation and bone turnover would provide a superior quantitative readout and would discriminate between a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) and a non-DMARD treatment.

        Methods: Using two protease-activated near-infrared fluorescence imaging agents to detect inflammation-associated cathepsin and matrix metalloprotease activity, and a third agent to detect bone turnover, we quantified fluorescence in paws of mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis. Fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) imaging results, which provided deep tissue detection and quantitative readouts in absolute picomoles of agent fluorescence per paw, were compared with paw swelling, clinical scores, a panel of plasma biomarkers, and histopathology to discriminate between steroid (prednisolone), DMARD (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor) and non-DMARD (celecoxib, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor) treatments.

        Results: Paw thickness, clinical score, and plasma biomarkers failed to discriminate well between a p38 MAPK inhibitor and a COX-2 inhibitor. In contrast, FMT quantification using near-infrared agents to detect protease activity or bone resorption yielded a clear discrimination between the different classes of therapeutics. FMT results agreed well with inflammation scores, and both imaging and histopathology provided clearer discrimination between treatments as compared with paw swelling, clinical score, and serum biomarker readouts.

        Conclusions: Non-invasive optical tomographic imaging offers a unique approach to monitoring disease pathogenesis and correlates with histopathology assessment of joint inflammation and bone resorption. The specific use of optical tomography allowed accurate three-dimensional imaging, quantitation in picomoles rather than intensity or relative fluorescence, and, for the first time, showed that non-invasive imaging assessment can predict the pathologist's histology inflammation scoring and discriminate DMARD from non-DMARD activity.
      13. URL :
        http://arthritis-research.com/content/12/3/R105
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4513
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All