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      1. Author :
        Lin, S. A.; Patel, M.; Suresch, D.; Connolly, B.; Bao, B.; Groves, K.; Rajopadhye, M.; Peterson, J. D.; Klimas, M.; Sur, C.; Bednar, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Mol Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2012
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        189254
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        FMT, Prosense, CatB, Cathepsin B, fluorescence imaing, tomography, microCT
      12. Abstract :
        Inflammation as a core pathological event of atherosclerotic lesions is associated with the secretion of cathepsin proteases and the expression of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin. We employed fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) noninvasive imaging of these molecular activities using cathepsin sensing (ProSense, CatB FAST) and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin (IntegriSense) near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) agents. A statistically significant increase in the ProSense and IntegriSense signal was observed within the chest region of apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05) versus C57BL/6 mice starting 25 and 22 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. In a treatment study using ezetimibe (7 mg/kg), there was a statistically significant reduction in the ProSense and CatB FAST chest signal of treated (P < 0.05) versus untreated apoE(-/-) mice at 31 and 21 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. The signal of ProSense and CatB FAST correlated with macrophage counts and was found associated with inflammatory cells by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry of cells dissociated from aortas. This report demonstrates that cathepsin and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin NIRF agents can be used as molecular imaging biomarkers for longitudinal detection of atherosclerosis, and cathepsin agents can monitor anti-inflammatory effects of ezetimibe with applications in preclinical testing of therapeutics and potentially for early diagnosis of atherosclerosis in patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23119157
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10571
      1. Author :
        Ibarra, J. M.; Jimenez, F.; Martinez, H. G.; Clark, K.; Ahuja, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Inflam
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2011
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        The Standard measures of experimental arthritis fail to detect, visualize, and quantify early inflammation and disease activity. Here, we describe the use of an injectable MMP-activated fluorescence agent for in vivo quantification of acute inflammation produced by collagen-antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) in CC chemokine receptor-2 (Ccr2(-/-)) null mice. Although Ccr2(-/-) DBA1/J mice were highly susceptible to and rapidly developed CAIA, the standard clinical assessment of fore or hind paw thicknesses was unable to detect significant acute inflammatory changes (days 3-10). Remarkably, noninvasive, in situ, MMP-activatable fluorescent imaging of Ccr2(-/-) DBA1/J mice with CAIA displayed acute joint pathology in advance of clinically measurable acute inflammation (days 5, 7, and 10). These results were confirmed by the histology of ankle joints, which showed significant inflammation, bone loss, and synovial hyperplasia, compared to control mice at postimmunization day 5. The MMP-mediated fluorescence technique holds tremendous implications for quantifiable examination of arthritis disease activity of acute joint inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21755029
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10462
      1. Author :
        Missbach-Guentner, J.; Hunia, J.; Alves, F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Dev Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Angiogenesis Inhibitors/therapeutic use; Animals; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Fluorescence; Humans; Luminescence/diagnostic use; Magnetic Resonance Angiography/methods; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods; Microscopy/methods; Neoplasms/*blood supply/therapy; *Neovascularization, Pathologic/pathology/ultrasonography; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods
      12. Abstract :
        Significant advances have been made in understanding the role of tumor angiogenesis and its influence on tumor progression in cancer. Based on this knowledge, a series of inhibitors of angiogenesis have been developed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials. Since detailed information of tumor progression in response to therapy is important to assess the efficacy of anti-tumor treatment in vivo, noninvasive imaging techniques emerge more and more as important tools to monitor alterations in tumor growth and vessel recruitment, as well as metastatic spread over time. So far, remarkable efforts have been made to improve the technical capability of these imaging modalities based on better resolution, as well as to implement multimodal approaches combining molecular with anatomical information. Advanced imaging techniques not only allow the detection and monitoring of tumor development, but also facilitate a broad understanding of the cellular and molecular events that propagate tumor angiogenesis, as well as those occurring in response to therapy. This review provides an overview of different imaging techniques in preclinical settings of oncological research and discusses their potential impact on clinical translation. Imaging modalities will be presented that have been implemented to address key biological issues by exploring tumor angiogenic processes and evaluating antiangiogenic therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21858774
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 32
      15. Serial :
        10373
      1. Author :
        Pickert, G.; Lim, H. Y.; Weigert, A.; Haussler, A.; Myrczek, T.; Waldner, M.; Labocha, S.; Ferreiros, N.; Geisslinger, G.; Lotsch, J.; Becker, C.; Brune, B.; Tegeder, I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense
      12. Abstract :
        GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) is the key-enzyme to produce the essential enzyme cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin. The byproduct, neopterin is increased in advanced human cancer and used as cancer-biomarker, suggesting that pathologically increased GCH1 activity may promote tumor growth. We found that inhibition or silencing of GCH1 reduced tumor cell proliferation and survival and the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, which upon hypoxia increased GCH1 and endothelial NOS expression, the latter prevented by inhibition of GCH1. In nude mice xenografted with HT29-Luc colon cancer cells GCH1 inhibition reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis, determined by in vivo luciferase and near-infrared imaging of newly formed blood vessels. The treatment with the GCH1 inhibitor shifted the phenotype of tumor associated macrophages from the proangiogenic M2 towards M1, accompanied with a shift of plasma chemokine profiles towards tumor-attacking chemokines including CXCL10 and RANTES. GCH1 expression was increased in mouse AOM/DSS-induced colon tumors and in high grade human colon and skin cancer and oppositely, the growth of GCH1-deficient HT29-Luc tumor cells in mice was strongly reduced. The data suggest that GCH1 inhibition reduces tumor growth by (i) direct killing of tumor cells, (ii) by inhibiting angiogenesis, and (iii) by enhancing the antitumoral immune response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22753274
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10377
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U87-MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, U87MG-luc2, Bioluminescence, Glioma, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10424
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10498
      1. Author :
        O'Connor, A. E.; Mc Gee, M. M.; Likar, Y.; Ponomarev, V.; Callanan, J. J.; O'Shea D, F.; Byrne, A. T.; Gallagher, W. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for cancer. ADPM06 is an emerging non-porphyrin PDT agent which has been specifically designed for therapeutic application. Recently, we have demonstrated that ADPM06-PDT is well tolerated in vivo and elicits impressive complete response rates in various models of cancer when a short drug-light interval is applied. Herein, the mechanism of action of ADPM06-PDT in vitro and in vivo is outlined. Using a drug and light combination that reduces the clonogenicity of MDA-MB-231 cells by >90%, we detected a well-orchestrated apoptotic response accompanied by the activation of various caspases in vitro. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photosensitizer irradiation was found to be the key instigator in the observed apoptotic response, with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) found to be the intracellular site of initial PDT damage, as determined by induction of a rapid ER stress response post-PDT. PDT-induced apoptosis was also found to be independent of p53 tumor suppressor status. A robust therapeutic response in vivo was demonstrated, with a substantial reduction in tumor proliferation observed, as well as a rapid induction of apoptosis and initiation of ER stress, mirroring numerous aspects of the mechanism of action of ADPM06 in vitro. Finally, using a combination of (18) F-labeled 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ((18) F-FLT) nuclear and optical imaging, a considerable decrease in tumor proliferation over 24-hr in two models of human cancer was observed. Taken together, this data clearly establishes ADPM06 as an exciting novel PDT agent with significant potential for further translational development.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21413012
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10516
      1. Author :
        Francis, K P; Yu, J; Bellinger-Kawahara, C; Joh, D; Hawkinson, M J; Xiao, G; Purchio, T F; Caparon, M G; Lipsitch, M; Contag, P R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amoxicillin; Animals; Bioware; DNA Transposable Elements; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Lung; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasopharynx; Operon; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-5; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Transformation, Bacterial, Xen10, Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        Animal studies with Streptococcus pneumoniae have provided valuable models for drug development. In order to monitor long-term pneumococcal infections noninvasively in living mice, a novel gram-positive lux transposon cassette, Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), that allows random integration of lux genes onto the bacterial chromosome was constructed. The cassette was designed so that the luxABCDE and kanamycin resistance genes were linked to form a single promoterless operon. Bioluminescence and kanamycin resistance only occur in a bacterial cell if this operon has transposed downstream of a promoter on the bacterium's chromosome. S. pneumoniae D39 was transformed with plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), and a number of highly bioluminescent colonies were recovered. Genomic DNA from the brightest D39 strain was used to transform a number of clinical S. pneumoniae isolates, and several of these strains were tested in animal models, including a pneumococcal lung infection model. Strong bioluminescent signals were seen in the lungs of the animals containing these pneumococci, allowing the course and antibiotic treatment of the infections to be readily monitored in real time in the living animals. Recovery of the bacteria from the animals showed that the bioluminescent signal corresponded to the number of CFU and that the lux construct was highly stable even after several days in vivo. We believe that this lux transposon will greatly expand the ability to evaluate drug efficacy against gram-positive bacteria in living animals using bioluminescence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11292758
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9027
      1. Author :
        Hardy, Jonathan; Margolis, Jeffrey J; Contag, Christopher H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        74
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacterial Toxins; Biliary Tract; Bioware; Feces; Food Contamination; Intestines; Listeria monocytogenes; Listeriosis; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; pXen-5
      12. Abstract :
        Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous gram-positive bacterium that can cause systemic and often life-threatening disease in immunocompromised hosts. This organism is largely an intracellular pathogen; however, we have determined that it can also grow extracellularly in animals, in the lumen of the gallbladder. The significance of growth in the gallbladder with respect to the pathogenesis and spread of listeriosis depends on the ability of the bacterium to leave this organ and be disseminated to other tissues and into the environment. Should this process be highly inefficient, growth in the gallbladder would have no impact on pathogenesis or spread, but if it occurs efficiently, bacterial growth in this organ may contribute to listeriosis and dissemination of this organism. Here, we use whole-body imaging to determine the efficacy and kinetics of food- and hormone-induced biliary excretion of L. monocytogenes from the murine gallbladder, demonstrating that transit through the bile duct into the intestine can occur within 5 min of induction of gallbladder contraction by food or cholecystokinin and that movement of bacteria through the intestinal lumen can occur very rapidly in the absence of fecal material. These studies demonstrate that L. monocytogenes bacteria replicating in the gallbladder can be expelled from the organ efficiently and that the released bacteria move into the intestinal tract, where they pass into the environment and may possibly reinfect the animal.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16495556
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9024
      1. Author :
        Schwan, William R; Lehmann, Lynn; McCormick, James
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        74
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral; Animals; Bacterial Proteins; Bioware; Blotting, Northern; Disease Models, Animal; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Humans; Lac Operon; Mice; Osmolar Concentration; Proline; pXen-5; Recombinant Fusion Proteins; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Symporters; Transcriptional Activation
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcus aureus can grow virtually anywhere in the human body but needs to import proline through low- and high-affinity proline transporters to survive. This study examined the regulation of the S. aureus putP gene, which encodes a high-affinity proline permease. putP::lacZ and putP::lux transcriptional fusions were constructed and integrated into the genomes of several S. aureus strains. Enzyme activity was measured after growth in media with various osmolyte concentrations. As osmolarity rose, putP expression increased, with a plateau at 2 M for NaCl in strain LL3-1. Proline concentrations as low as 17.4 muM activated expression of the putP gene. The putP::lux fusion was also integrated into the genomes of S. aureus strains that were either SigB inactive (LL3-1, 8325-4, and SH1003) or SigB active (Newman and SH1000). SigB inactive strains showed increased putP gene expression as NaCl concentrations rose, whereas SigB active strains displayed a dramatic decrease in putP expression, suggesting that the alternative sigma factor B plays a negative role in putP regulation. Mice inoculated with S. aureus strains containing the putP::lux fusion exhibited up to a 715-fold increase in putP expression, although levels in the various murine organs differed. Moreover, urine from human patients infected with S. aureus showed elevated putP levels by use of a PCR procedure, whereas blood and some abscess material had no significant increase. Thus, putP is transcriptionally activated by a low-proline and high osmotic environment both in growth media and in murine or human clinical specimens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16368996
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9023
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