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      1. Author :
        Pozo, J. L. del; Rouse, M. S.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Sampedro, M. F.; Steckelberg, J. M.; Patel, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen30, Xen5, Xen41
      12. Abstract :
        Bacterial biofilms are resistant to conventional antimicrobial agents. Prior in vitro studies have shown that electrical current (EC) enhances the activities of aminoglycosides, quinolones, and oxytetracycline against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus gordonii. This phenomenon, known as the bioelectric effect, has been only partially defined. The purpose of this work was to study the in vitro bioelectric effect on the activities of 11 antimicrobial agents representing a variety of different classes against P. aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and S. epidermidis. An eight-channel current generator/controller and eight chambers delivering a continuous flow of fresh medium with or without antimicrobial agents and/or EC to biofilm-coated coupons were used. No significant decreases in the numbers of log10 CFU/cm2 were seen after exposure to antimicrobial agents alone, with the exception of a 4.57-log-unit reduction for S. epidermidis and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. We detected a statistically significant bioelectric effect when vancomycin plus 2,000 microamperes EC were used against MRSA biofilms (P = 0.04) and when daptomycin and erythromycin were used in combination with 200 or 2,000 microamperes EC against S. epidermidis biofilms (P = 0.02 and 0.0004, respectively). The results of these experiments indicate that the enhancement of the activity of antimicrobial agents against biofilm organisms by EC is not a generalizable phenomenon across microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18725436
      14. Call Number :
        137347
      15. Serial :
        5991
      1. Author :
        Dai, T.; Tegos, G. P.; Burkatovskaya, M.; Castano, A. P.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        An engineered chitosan acetate bandage preparation (HemCon) is used as a hemostatic dressing, and its chemical structure suggests that it should also be antimicrobial. We previously showed that when a chitosan acetate bandage was applied to full-thickness excisional wounds in mice that had been infected with pathogenic bioluminescent bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus), it was able to rapidly kill the bacteria and save the mice from developing fatal infections. Wound healing was also stimulated. In the present study, we asked whether a chitosan acetate bandage could act as a topical antimicrobial dressing when it was applied to third-degree burns in mice contaminated with two of these bacterial species (P. aeruginosa and P. mirabilis). Preliminary experiments established the length of burn time and the number of bacteria needed to produce fatal infections in untreated mice and established that the chitosan acetate bandage could adhere to the infected burn for up to 21 days. In the case of P. aeruginosa infections, the survival rate of mice treated with the chitosan acetate bandage was 73.3% (whereas the survival rate of mice treated with a nanocrystalline silver dressing was 27.3% [P = 0.0055] and that of untreated mice was 13.3% [P < 0.0002]). For P. mirabilis infections, the comparable survival rates were 66.7%, 62.5%, and 23.1% respectively. Quantitative bioluminescent signals showed that the chitosan acetate bandage effectively controlled the growth of bacteria in the burn and prevented the development of systemic sepsis, as shown by blood culture. These data suggest that chitosan acetate bandage is efficacious in preventing fatal burn infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19015341
      14. Call Number :
        137209
      15. Serial :
        5713
      1. Author :
        Bucki, Robert; Leszczynska, Katarzyna; Byfield, Fitzroy J; Fein, David E; Won, Esther; Cruz, Katrina; Namiot, Andrzej; Kulakowska, Alina; Namiot, Zbigniew; Savage, Paul B; Diamond, Scott L; Janmey, Paul A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        54
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Anti-Inflammatory Agents; Bacterial Infections; Biofilms; Cathelicidins; Cattle; Cells, Cultured; Dexamethasone; Drug Design; Humans; Interleukins; Macrophages; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Neutrophils; Phagocytosis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Receptors, Glucocorticoid; Spermine; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        The rising number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains represents an emerging health problem that has motivated efforts to develop new antibacterial agents. Endogenous cationic antibacterial peptides (CAPs) that are produced in tissues exposed to the external environment are one model for the design of novel antibacterial compounds. Here, we report evidence that disubstituted dexamethasone-spermine (D2S), a cationic corticosteroid derivative initially identified as a by-product of synthesis of dexamethasone-spermine (DS) for the purpose of improving cellular gene delivery, functions as an antibacterial peptide-mimicking molecule. This moiety exhibits bacterial killing activity against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa present in cystic fibrosis (CF) sputa, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. Although compromised in the presence of plasma, D2S antibacterial activity resists the proteolytic activity of pepsin and is maintained in ascites, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. D2S also enhances S. aureus susceptibility to antibiotics, such as amoxicillin (AMC), tetracycline (T), and amikacin (AN). Inhibition of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-treated neutrophils in the presence of D2S suggests that this molecule might also prevent systemic inflammation caused by bacterial wall products. D2S-mediated translocation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in bovine aorta endothelial cells (BAECs) suggests that some of its anti-inflammatory activities involve engagement of glucocorticoid receptors. The combined antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of D2S suggest its potential as an alternative to natural CAPs in the prevention and treatment of some bacterial infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20308375
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9996
      1. Author :
        Pozo, J. L. del; Rouse, M. S.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Steckelberg, J. M.; Patel, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aza Compounds/pharmacology, Biofilms/drug effects/*growth & development, Electricity/*adverse effects, Pseudomonas/drug effects/*growth & development, Quinolines/pharmacology, Staphylococcus/drug effects/*growth & development, Tobramycin/pharmacology IVIS, Xenogen, Xen30
      12. Abstract :
        The activity of electrical current against planktonic bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The short-term exposure of the bacteria in biofilms to electrical current in the absence of antimicrobials has been shown to have no substantial effect; however, longer-term exposure has not been studied. A previously described in vitro model was used to determine the effect of prolonged exposure (i.e., up to 7 days) to low-intensity (i.e., 20-, 200-, and 2,000-microampere) electrical direct currents on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. Dose- and time-dependent killing was observed. A maximum of a 6-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. epidermidis biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. A 4- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. aureus biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. Finally, a 3.5- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when P. aeruginosa biofilms were exposed to electrical current for 7 days. A higher electrical current intensity correlated with greater decreases in viable bacteria at all time points studied. In conclusion, low-intensity electrical current substantially reduced the numbers of viable bacteria in staphylococcal or Pseudomonas biofilms, a phenomenon we have labeled the “electricidal effect.”
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18955534
      14. Call Number :
        137350
      15. Serial :
        7845
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Adams, C. S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/drug effects/growth & development; *Bone Transplantation; Bone and Bones/*chemistry/*microbiology; Cell Adhesion/drug effects; Cell Line; Colony Count, Microbial; Humans; Microscopy, Confocal; Osteoblasts/cytology; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/*growth & development/physiology; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is an important medical problem associated with the use of bone allografts. To retard bacterial colonization, we have recently reported on the modification of bone allografts with the antibiotic vancomycin (VAN). In this report, we examine the ability of this antibiotic-modified allograft to resist bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. When antibiotic was coupled to the allograft, a uniform distribution of the antibiotic was apparent. Following challenges with Staphylococcus aureus for 6 h, the covalently bonded VAN decreased colonization as a function of inoculum, ranging from 0.8 to 2.0 log(10) CFU. Furthermore, the VAN-modified surface resisted biofilm formation, even in topographical niches that provide a protected environment for bacterial adhesion. Attachment of the antibiotic to the allograft surface was robust, and the bonded VAN was stable whether incubated in aqueous media or in air, maintaining levels of 75 to 100% of initial levels over 60 days. While the VAN-modified allograft inhibited the Gram-positive S. aureus colonization, in keeping with VAN's spectrum of activity, the VAN-modified allograft was readily colonized by the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Finally, initial toxicity measures indicated that the VAN-modified allograft did not influence osteoblast colonization or viability. Since the covalently tethered antibiotic is stable, is active, retains its specificity, and does not exhibit toxicity, it is concluded that this modified allograft holds great promise for decreasing bone graft-associated infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21098245
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10408
      1. Author :
        Chauhan, A.; Lebeaux, D.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilms that develop on indwelling devices are a major concern in clinical settings. While removal of colonized devices remains the most frequent strategy for avoiding device-related complications, antibiotic lock therapy constitutes an adjunct therapy for catheter-related infection. However, currently used antibiotic lock solutions are not fully effective against biofilms, thus warranting a search for new antibiotic locks. Metal-binding chelators have emerged as potential adjuvants due to their dual anticoagulant/antibiofilm activities, but studies investigating their efficiency were mainly in vitro or else focused on their effects in prevention of infection. To assess the ability of such chelators to eradicate mature biofilms, we used an in vivo model of a totally implantable venous access port inserted in rats and colonized by either Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that use of tetrasodium EDTA (30 mg/ml) as a supplement to the gentamicin (5 mg/ml) antibiotic lock solution associated with systemic antibiotics completely eradicated Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms developed in totally implantable venous access ports. Gentamicin-EDTA lock was able to eliminate biofilms with a single instillation, thus reducing length of treatment. Moreover, we show that this combination was effective for immunosuppressed rats. Lastly, we demonstrate that a gentamicin-EDTA lock is able to eradicate the biofilm formed by a gentamicin-resistant strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This in vivo study demonstrates the potential of EDTA as an efficient antibiotic adjuvant to eradicate catheter-associated biofilms of major bacterial pathogens and thus provides a promising new lock solution.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23027191
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10552
      1. Author :
        Hanai, Koji; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Honma, Kimi; Nagahara, Shunji; Maeda, Miho; Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Sano, Akihiko; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1082
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Neoplasms; Collagen; Dermatitis; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Carriers; Gene Therapy; Humans; Hypersensitivity; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanoparticles; Neoplasm Metastasis; Oligonucleotides; PC-3M-luc; RNA, Small Interfering; Tissue Distribution
      12. Abstract :
        The goal of our research is to provide a practical platform for drug delivery in oligonucleotide therapy. We report here the efficacy of an atelocollagen-mediated oligonucleotide delivery system applied to systemic siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide treatments in animal disease models. Atelocollagen and oligonucleotides formed a complex of nanosized particles, which was highly stable against nucleases. The complex allowed oligonucleotides to be delivered efficiently into several organs and tissues via intravenous administration. In a tumor metastasis model, the complex successfully delivered siRNA to metastasized tumors in bone tissue and inhibited their growth. We also demonstrated that a single intravenous treatment of the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide complex suppressed ear dermatitis in a contact hypersensitivity model. These results indicate the strong potential of the atelocollagen-mediated drug delivery system for practical therapeutic technology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17145919
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8976
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1192
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Bone Density Conservation Agents; Chronic Disease; Cytokines; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Humans; Immunity; Incidence; Jaw Diseases; Mice; Neovascularization, Physiologic; Osteoclasts; Osteomyelitis; Osteonecrosis; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The effects of antiresorptive agents (e.g., alendronate [Aln], osteoprotegerin [OPG]) on bone infection are unknown. Thus, their effects on implant-associated osteomyelitis (OM) were investigated in mice using PBS (placebo), gentamycin, and etanercept (TNFR:Fc) controls. None of the drugs affected humoral immunity, angiogenesis, or chronic infection. However, the significant (P < 0.05 vs. PBS) inhibition of cortical osteolysis and decreased draining lymph node size in Aln- and OPG-treated mice was associated with a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the incidence of high-grade infections during the establishment of OM. In contrast, the high-grade infections in TNFR:Fc-treated mice were associated with immunosuppression, as evidenced by the absence of granulomas and presence of Gram(+) biofilm in the bone marrow. Collectively, these findings indicate that although antiresorptive agents do not exacerbate chronic OM, they can increase the bacterial load during early infection by decreasing lymphatic drainage and preventing the removal of necrotic bone that harbors the bacteria.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20392222
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9034
      1. Author :
        Razavi, Reza; Harrison, Lawrence E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgical oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carcinoma; Cell Proliferation; Colonic Neoplasms; DNA Damage; Drug Therapy, Combination; Female; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Hyperthermia, Induced; Injections, Intraperitoneal; Mice; Mice, Nude; Oxidants; Oxidative Stress; Survival Rate; tert-Butylhydroperoxide; Treatment Outcome; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to extend our in vitro observations that induced oxidative stress under hyperthermic conditions decreases tumor cell growth into a preclinical murine model of hyperthermic perfusion. METHODS A nude mouse model of colon cancer carcinomatosis with HT-29-Luc-D6 colon cancer cells was established, and tumor growth was measured by serial bioluminescent imaging. RESULTS By means of a survival model of hyperthermic perfusion, we demonstrated that perfusion with normothermic saline decreased tumor growth compared with no perfusion controls, and tumor growth was further decreased with hyperthermic perfusion alone. The induction of oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide in the perfusate at concentrations as high as 600 microM was well tolerated in this model of hyperthermic perfusion. Importantly, induced oxidative stress using hydrogen peroxide under hyperthermic conditions significantly decreased in vivo tumor cell growth compared with all other controls. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of our observations, thermal sensitization through modulation of cellular oxidative stress may represent a novel approach to increase the efficacy of hyperthermia as an anticancer modality.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19711132
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9008
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        251
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abdominal Wall; Animals; Bioware; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Polypropylenes; Polytetrafluoroethylene; pXen-5; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Surgical Mesh; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE To study the influence of morphology of surgical meshes on the course of bacterial infection under the influence of the host immune system in an in vivo chronic bacterial infection model. BACKGROUND The use of prosthetic meshes has increased dramatically the last decades in abdominal wall reconstructive surgery. Whereas infection is becoming a more frequent complication, attention is increasingly drawn to the influence of the surgeon's mesh choice on the course of this complication. METHODS Samples of 6 often applied surgical meshes were contaminated with a bioluminescent strain of Staphylococcus aureus and implanted subcutaneously in an immunocompetent BALB/c mouse. The intensity and the spreading of bioluminescence (ie, p/s/cm/sr) were analyzed non-invasively in vivo during a 10-day follow-up period. RESULTS Over the course of infection, multifilament polypropylene and hydrophobic materials showed a significantly higher persistence of bacteria as well as spreading of infection compared to all other meshes. In contrast, infection resolved in almost all animals with a low-weight polyester mesh. CONCLUSION The results of this study are in accordance with circumstantial evidence from limited clinical reports on infection involving surgical meshes and suggest that multifilament and hydrophobic meshes significantly increase bacterial persistence or spreading in the infected area in contrast to monofilament polypropylene and lightweight meshes. Therefore, the surgeon should consider this outcome when choosing a mesh graft for limiting infection in abdominal wall repair.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19864938
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9017
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