1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

461–470 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Water Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen39, Xen26, Xen14, Xen36, Xen 5, Xen 39, Xen 26, Xen 14, Xen 36, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Klebsiella, E. coli, Salmonella,
      12. Abstract :
        The 3(2H) furanone derivative 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was investigated for its antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5 and Salmonella typhimurium Xen 26. Nanofibers electrospun from solution blends of DMHF and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were tested for their ability to inhibit surface-attachment of bacteria. Antimicrobial and adhesion inhibition activity was determined via the plate counting technique. To quantify viable but non-culturable cells and to validate the plate counting results, bioluminescence and fluorescence studies were carried out. Nanofiber production was upscaled using the bubble electrospinning technique. To ascertain that no DMHF leached into filtered water, samples of water filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261340
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10549
      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; Bshena, O.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Biomacromolecules
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
      12. Abstract :
        The ability of brominated furanones and other furanone compounds with 2(3H) and 2(5H) cores to inhibit bacterial adhesion of surfaces as well deactivate (destroy) them has been previously reported. The furanone derivatives 4-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone and 5-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)-ethoxy)methyl)-2(5H)-furanone were synthesized in our laboratory. These furanone derivatives were then covalently immobilized onto poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (SMA) and electrospun to fabricate nonwoven nanofibrous mats with antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties. The electrospun nanofibrous mats were tested for their ability to inhibit cell attachment by strains of bacteria commonly found in water ( Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5, and Salmonella tymphimurium Xen 26). Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR), electrospray mass spectroscopy (ES-MS), and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to confirm the structures of the synthesized furanones as well as their successful immobilization on SMA. To ascertain that the immobilized furanone compounds do not leach into filtered water, samples of water, filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The morphology of the electrospun nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22947312
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10550
      1. Author :
        Leszczynska, K.; Namiot, D.; Byfield, F. J.; Cruz, K.; Zendzian-Piotrowska, M.; Fein, D. E.; Savage, P. B.; Diamond, S.; McCulloch, C. A.; Janmey, P. A.; Bucki, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Antimicrob Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: We aim to develop antibacterial peptide mimics resistant to protease degradation, with broad-spectrum activity at sites of infection. METHODS: The bactericidal activities of LL-37, ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-90 and CSA-92 and the spermine-conjugated dexamethasone derivative D2S were evaluated using MIC and MBC measurements. Gingival fibroblast counting, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from keratinocytes (HaCat) were used to determine effects on cell growth, pro-inflammatory response and toxicity. RESULTS: All tested cationic lipids showed stronger bactericidal activity than LL-37. Incubation of Staphylococcus aureus with half the MIC of LL-37 led to the appearance of bacteria resistant to its bactericidal effects, but identical incubations with CSA-13 or D2S did not produce resistant bacteria. Cathelicidin LL-37 significantly increased the total number of gingival fibroblasts, but ceragenins and D2S did not alter gingival fibroblast growth. Cationic lipids showed no toxicity to HaCat cells at concentrations resulting in bacterial killing. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that cationic lipids such as ceragenins warrant further testing as potential novel antibacterial agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23134677
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10551
      1. Author :
        Chauhan, A.; Lebeaux, D.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilms that develop on indwelling devices are a major concern in clinical settings. While removal of colonized devices remains the most frequent strategy for avoiding device-related complications, antibiotic lock therapy constitutes an adjunct therapy for catheter-related infection. However, currently used antibiotic lock solutions are not fully effective against biofilms, thus warranting a search for new antibiotic locks. Metal-binding chelators have emerged as potential adjuvants due to their dual anticoagulant/antibiofilm activities, but studies investigating their efficiency were mainly in vitro or else focused on their effects in prevention of infection. To assess the ability of such chelators to eradicate mature biofilms, we used an in vivo model of a totally implantable venous access port inserted in rats and colonized by either Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that use of tetrasodium EDTA (30 mg/ml) as a supplement to the gentamicin (5 mg/ml) antibiotic lock solution associated with systemic antibiotics completely eradicated Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms developed in totally implantable venous access ports. Gentamicin-EDTA lock was able to eliminate biofilms with a single instillation, thus reducing length of treatment. Moreover, we show that this combination was effective for immunosuppressed rats. Lastly, we demonstrate that a gentamicin-EDTA lock is able to eradicate the biofilm formed by a gentamicin-resistant strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This in vivo study demonstrates the potential of EDTA as an efficient antibiotic adjuvant to eradicate catheter-associated biofilms of major bacterial pathogens and thus provides a promising new lock solution.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23027191
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10552
      1. Author :
        Dai, T.; Tegos, G. P.; Zhiyentayev, T.; Mylonakis, E.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Lasers Surg Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        42
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Administration, Cutaneous; Animals; Disease Models, Animal; Female; *Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Photobleaching; *Photochemotherapy; Polyethyleneimine/administration & dosage; Porphyrins/*administration & dosage; Radiation-Sensitizing Agents/*administration & dosage; Staphylococcal Skin Infections/etiology/pathology/*therapy; Wound Infection/microbiology/pathology/*therapy
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin infections are now known to be a common and important problem in the Unites States. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of MRSA infection in skin abrasion wounds using a mouse model. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: A mouse model of skin abrasion wound infected with MRSA was developed. Bioluminescent strain of MRSA, a derivative of ATCC 33591, was used to allow the real-time monitoring of the extent of infection in mouse wounds. PDT was performed with the combination of a polyethylenimine (PEI)-ce6 photosensitizer (PS) and non-coherent red light. In vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out to evaluate the effect of photobleaching of PS during PDT. RESULTS: In vivo fluorescence imaging of conjugate PEI-ce6 applied in mice indicated the photobleaching effect of the PS during PDT. PDT induced on average 2.7 log(10) of inactivation of MRSA as judged by loss of bioluminescence in mouse skin abrasion wounds and accelerated the wound healing on average by 8.6 days in comparison to the untreated infected wounds. Photobleaching of PS in the wound was overcome by adding the PS solution in aliquots. CONCLUSION: PDT may represent an alternative approach for the treatment of MRSA skin infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20077489
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10553
      1. Author :
        Krespi, Y. P.; Kizhner, V.; Nistico, L.; Hall-Stoodley, L.; Stoodley, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Am J Otolaryngol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Biofilms/drug effects/*radiation effects; Ciprofloxacin/*pharmacology; Culture Media; High-Energy Shock Waves; Humans; *Laser Therapy, Low-Level; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*growth &; development/physiology/*radiation effects; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Reference Values; Sensitivity and Specificity; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to study the efficacy of 2 different lasers in vitro, in disrupting biofilm and killing planktonic pathogenic bacteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Biofilms of a stable bioluminescent of Staphylococcus aureus Xen 31 were grown in a 96-well microtiter plate for 3 days. The study included 7 arms: (a) control; (b) ciprofloxacin (3 mg/L, the established minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]) alone; (c) shock wave (SW) laser alone; (d) near-infrared (NIR) laser alone; (e) SW laser and ciprofloxacin; (f) SW and NIR lasers; (g) SW, NIR lasers, and ciprofloxacin. The results were evaluated with an in vivo imaging system (IVIS) biophotonic system (for live bacteria) and optical density (OD) for total bacteria. RESULTS: Without antibiotics, there was a 43% reduction in OD (P < .05) caused by the combination of SW and NIR suggesting that biofilm had been disrupted. There was an 88% reduction (P < .05) in live biofilm. Ciprofloxacin alone resulted in a decrease of 28% of total live cells (biofilm remaining attached) and 58% of biofilm cells (both P > .05). Ciprofloxacin in combination with SW and SW + NIR lasers caused a decrease of more than 60% in total live biomass and more than 80% of biofilm cells, which was significantly greater than ciprofloxacin alone (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated an effective nonpharmacologic treatment method for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilm disruption and killing using 2 different lasers. The preferred treatment sequence is a SW laser disruption of biofilm followed by NIR laser illumination. Treatment optimization of biofilm is possible with the addition of ciprofloxacin in concentrations consistent with planktonic MIC.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20434806
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10554
      1. Author :
        Ragas, X.; Sanchez-Garcia, D.; Ruiz-Gonzalez, R.; Dai, T.; Agut, M.; Hamblin, M. R.; Nonell, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Med Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Animals; Bacterial Infections/*drug therapy; Burns/drug therapy/microbiology; Candida/drug effects; Cations; Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects; Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects; Male; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; *Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Porphyrins/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Solubility; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Structure-Activity Relationship
      12. Abstract :
        Structures of typical photosensitizers used in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy are based on porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and phenothiazinium salts, with cationic charges at physiological pH values. However, derivatives of the porphycene macrocycle (a structural isomer of porphyrin) have barely been investigated as antimicrobial agents. Therefore, we report the synthesis of the first tricationic water-soluble porphycene and its basic photochemical properties. We successfully tested it for in vitro photoinactivation of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as a fungal species (Candida) in a drug-dose and light-dose dependent manner. We also used the cationic porphycene in vivo to treat an infection model comprising mouse third degree burns infected with a bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. There was a 2.6-log(10) reduction (p < 0.001) of the bacterial bioluminescence for the PDT-treated group after irradiation with 180 J.cm(-2) of red light.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20936792
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10555
      1. Author :
        Ragas, X.; Sanchez-Garcia, D.; Ruiz-Gonzalez, R.; Dai, T.; Agut, M.; Hamblin, M. R.; Nonell, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Med Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Animals; Bacterial Infections/*drug therapy; Burns/drug therapy/microbiology; Candida/drug effects; Cations; Gram-Negative Bacteria/drug effects; Gram-Positive Bacteria/drug effects; Male; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; *Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Porphyrins/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/pharmacology; Solubility; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Structure-Activity Relationship
      12. Abstract :
        Structures of typical photosensitizers used in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy are based on porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and phenothiazinium salts, with cationic charges at physiological pH values. However, derivatives of the porphycene macrocycle (a structural isomer of porphyrin) have barely been investigated as antimicrobial agents. Therefore, we report the synthesis of the first tricationic water-soluble porphycene and its basic photochemical properties. We successfully tested it for in vitro photoinactivation of different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as a fungal species (Candida) in a drug-dose and light-dose dependent manner. We also used the cationic porphycene in vivo to treat an infection model comprising mouse third degree burns infected with a bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. There was a 2.6-log(10) reduction (p < 0.001) of the bacterial bioluminescence for the PDT-treated group after irradiation with 180 J.cm(-2) of red light.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20936792
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10556
      1. Author :
        Tanaka, M.; Mroz, P.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Morimoto, Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Yoshihara, Y.; Nemoto, K.; Shinomiya, N.; Seki, S.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Animals; Arthritis, Infectious/*drug therapy/immunology/microbiology; *Immunity, Innate; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification; Methylene Blue/therapeutic use; Mice; Neutrophils/*immunology; *Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents/therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Local microbial infections induced by multiple-drug-resistant bacteria in the orthopedic field can be intractable, therefore development of new therapeutic modalities is needed. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative modality to antibiotics for intractable microbial infections, and we recently reported that PDT has the potential to accumulate neutrophils into the infected site which leads to resolution of the infection. PDT for cancer has long been known to be able to stimulate the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, a murine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) arthritis model using bioluminescent MRSA and polystyrene microparticles was established, and both the therapeutic (Th-PDT) and preventive (Pre-PDT) effects of PDT using methylene blue as photosensitizer were examined. Although Th-PDT could not demonstrate direct bacterial killing, neutrophils were accumulated into the infectious joint space after PDT and MRSA arthritis was reduced. With the preconditioning Pre-PDT regimen, neutrophils were quickly accumulated into the joint immediately after bacterial inoculation and bacterial growth was suppressed and the establishment of infection was inhibited. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first demonstration of a protective innate immune response against a bacterial pathogen produced by PDT.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22761911
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10557
      1. Author :
        Tanaka, M.; Mroz, P.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Morimoto, Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Yoshihara, Y.; Shinomiya, N.; Seki, S.; Nemoto, K.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Photochem Photobiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        We previously reported that photodynamic therapy (PDT) using intra-articular methylene blue (MB) could be used to treat arthritis in mice caused by bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) either in a therapeutic or in a preventative mode. PDT accumulated neutrophils into the mouse knee via activation of chemoattractants such as inflammatory cytokines or chemokines. In the present study, we asked whether PDT combined with antibiotics used for MRSA could provide added benefit in controlling the infection. We compared MB-PDT alone, systemic administration of either linezolid (LZD) alone or vancomycin (VCM) alone or the combination of PDT with either LZD or VCM. Real-time non-invasive imaging was used to serially follow the progress of the infection. PDT alone was the most effective, while LZD alone was ineffective and VCM alone showed some benefit. Surprisingly the addition of LZD or VCM reduced the therapeutic effect of PDT alone (P<0.05). Considering that PDT in this mouse model stimulates neutrophils to be antibacterial rather than actively killing the bacteria, we propose that LZD and VCM might inhibit the activation of inflammatory cytokines without eradicating the bacteria, and thereby reduce the therapeutic effect of PDT. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology (c) 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23311407
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10558
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All