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      1. Author :
        Vujanovic, L.; Ballard, W.; Thorne, S. H.; Vujanovic, N. L.; Butterfield, L. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncoimmunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Recombinant adenovirus-engineered dendritic cells (Ad.DC) are potent vaccines for induction of anti-viral and anti-cancer T cell immunity. The effectiveness of Ad.DC vaccines may depend on the newly described ability of Ad.DC to crosstalk with natural killer (NK) cells via cell-to-cell contact, and to mediate activation, polarization and bridging of innate and adaptive immunity. For this interaction to occur in vivo, Ad.DC must be able to attract NK cells from surrounding tissues or peripheral blood. We developed a novel live mouse imaging system-based NK-cell migration test, and demonstrated for the first time that human Ad.DC induced directional migration of human NK cells across subcutaneous tissues, indicating that Ad.DC-NK cell contact and interaction could occur in vivo. We examined the mechanism of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Ad.DC produced multiple chemokines previously reported to recruit NK cells, including immunoregulatory CXCL10/IP-10 and proinflammatory CXCL8/IL-8. In vitro chemotaxis experiments utilizing neutralizing antibodies and recombinant human chemokines showed that CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL8/IL-8 were critical for Ad.DC-mediated recruitment of CD56(hi)CD16(-) and CD56(lo)CD16(+) NK cells, respectively. The importance of CXCL8/IL-8 was further demonstrated in vivo. Pretreatment of mice with the neutralizing anti-CXCL8/IL-8 antibody led to significant inhibition of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vivo. These data show that Ad.DC can recruit spatially distant NK cells toward a vaccine site via specific chemokines. Therefore, an Ad.DC vaccine can likely induce interaction with endogenous NK cells via transmembrane mediators, and consequently mediate Th1 polarization and amplification of immune functions in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22754763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10570
      1. Author :
        Yamaoka, Ippei; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Endo, Naoyuki; Ebisu, Goro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2014
      5. Publication :
        BMC gastroenterology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        BALB/c CrSlc mice; enteral nutrition; Ex vivo; Gastrosense 750; Hine® E-gel; in vivo; IVIS® Spectrum; Nev11121; pectin
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Semi-solidification by gelation or increased viscosity could slow the influx of liquid enteral nutrition (EN) into the small intestine. A liquid EN formula containing pectin that gels under acidic conditions such as those found in the stomach has been developed. A new near-infrared fluorescent imaging reagent was used to non-invasively acquire real time images of gastric emptying in a murine model in vivo. We postulated that the EN formula delays gastric emptying and tested this hypothesis using imaging in vivo.
        METHODS: Male BALB/c mice were given an oral bolus injection of a liquid EN containing the fluorescence reagent GastroSense750 with or without pectin. The EN in the stomach was visualized in vivo at various intervals using a non-invasive live imaging system and fluorescent signals were monitored from the stomach, which was removed at 60 min after EN ingestion.
        RESULTS: The fluorescence intensity of signals in stomachs in vivo and in resected stomachs was lower and attenuated over time in mice given EN without, than with pectin.
        CONCLUSIONS: Adding a gelling agent such as pectin delayed the transit of liquid EN from the stomach. Fluorescence imaging can visualize the delayed gastric emptying of EN containing pectin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25263497
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        11641
      1. Author :
        Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor
      2. Title :
        Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: A possible implication for atherogenesis
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Food Funct.
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 6049
      15. Serial :
        14630
      1. Author :
        Sawada, R.; Sun, S. M.; Wu, X.; Hong, F.; Ragupathi, G.; Livingston, P. O.; Scholz, W. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Clin Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        1024-32
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Colo205-luc2, colorectal cancer, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: The carbohydrate antigen sialyl-Lewis(a) (sLe(a)), also known as CA19.9, is widely expressed on epithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and breast and on small-cell lung cancers. Since overexpression of sLe(a) appears to be a key event in invasion and metastasis of many tumors and results in susceptibility to antibody-mediated lysis, sLe(a) is an attractive molecular target for tumor therapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We generated and characterized fully human monoclonal antibodies (mAb) from blood lymphocytes from individuals immunized with a sLe(a)-KLH vaccine. RESULTS: Several mAbs were selected based on ELISA and FACS including two mAbs with high affinity for sLe(a) (5B1 and 7E3, binding affinities 0.14 and 0.04 nmol/L, respectively) and further characterized. Both antibodies were specific for Neu5Acalpha2-3Galbeta1-3(Fucalpha1-4)GlcNAcbeta as determined by glycan array analysis. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity against DMS-79 cells was higher (EC(50) 0.1 mug/mL vs. 1.7 mug/mL) for r7E3 (IgM) than for r5B1 (IgG1). In addition, r5B1 antibodies showed high level of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity on DMS-79 cells with human NK cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To evaluate in vivo efficacy, the antibodies were tested in a xenograft model with Colo205 tumor cells engrafted into SCID (severe combined immunodeficient mice) mice. Treatment during the first 21 days with four doses of r5B1 (100 mug per dose) doubled the median survival time to 207 days, and three of five animals survived with six doses. CONCLUSION: On the basis of the potential of sLe(a) as a target for immune attack and their affinity, specificity, and effector functions, 5B1and 7E3 may have clinical utility.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21343375
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10502
      1. Author :
        Min, Jung-Joon; Nguyen, Vu H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        15-24
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Cancer; Cardiology; Gene delivery vector; Gene Therapy; Imaging / Radiology; Molecular Imaging; Nuclear Medicine; Oncology; Orthopedics; Xen26
      12. Abstract :
        Cancer persists as one of the most devastating diseases in the world. Problems including metastasis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy have seriously limited the therapeutic effects of present clinical treatments. To overcome these limitations, cancer gene therapy has been developed over the last two decades for a broad spectrum of applications, from gene replacement and knockdown to vaccination, each with different requirements for gene delivery. So far, a number of genes and delivery vectors have been investigated, and significant progress has been made with several gene therapy modalities in clinical trials. Viral vectors and synthetic liposomes have emerged as the vehicles of choice for many applications. However, both have limitations and risks that restrict gene therapy applications, including the complexity of production, limited packaging capacity, and unfavorable immunological features. While continuing to improve these vectors, it is important to investigate other options, particularly nonviral biological agents such as bacteria, bacteriophages, and bacteria-like particles. Recently, many molecular imaging techniques for safe, repeated, and high-resolution in vivo imaging of gene expression have been employed to assess vector-mediated gene expression in living subjects. In this review, molecular imaging techniques for monitoring biological gene delivery vehicles are described, and the specific use of these methods at different steps is illustrated. Linking molecular imaging to gene therapy will eventually help to develop novel gene delivery vehicles for preclinical study and support the development of future human applications.
      13. URL :
        http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13139-009-0006-3
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10003
      1. Author :
        Fink, D.; Romanowski, K.; Valuckaite, V.; Babrowski, T.; Kim, M.; Matthews, J. B.; Liu, D.; Zaborina, O.; Alverdy, J. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Trauma
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        71
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        1575-82
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen41, Xen 41, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen41, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: : Experimental models of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR) injury are invariably performed in mice harboring their normal commensal flora, even though multiple IIR events occur in humans during prolonged intensive care confinement when they are colonized by a highly pathogenic hospital flora. The aims of this study were to determine whether the presence of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the distal intestine potentiates the lethality of mice exposed to IIR and to determine what role any in vivo virulence activation plays in the observed mortality. METHODS: : Seven- to 9-week-old C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 15 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) followed by direct intestinal inoculation of 1.0 x 10 colony-forming unit of P. aeruginosa PAO1 into the ileum and observed for mortality. Reiterative studies were performed in separate groups of mice to evaluate both the migration/dissemination pattern and in vivo virulence activation of intestinally inoculated strains using live photon camera imaging of both a constitutive bioluminescent P. aeruginosa PAO1 derivative XEN41 and an inducible reporter derivative of PAO1, the PAO1/lecA:luxCDABE that conditionally expresses the quorum sensing-dependent epithelial disrupting virulence protein PA 1 Lectin (PA-IL). RESULTS: : Mice exposed to 15 minutes of SMAO and reperfusion with intestinal inoculation of P. aeruginosa had a significantly increased mortality rate (p < 0.001) of 100% compared with <10% for sham-operated mice intestinally inoculated with P. aeruginosa without SMAO and IIR alone (<50%). Migration/dissemination patterns of P. aeruginosa in mice subjected to IIR demonstrated proximal migration of distally injected strains and translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney. A key role for in vivo virulence expression of the barrier disrupting adhesin PA-IL during IIR was established since its expression was enhanced during IR and mutant strains lacking PA-IL displayed attenuated mortality. CONCLUSIONS: : The presence of intestinal P. aeruginosa potentiates the lethal effect of IIR in mice in part due to in vivo virulence activation of its epithelial barrier disrupting protein PA-IL.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22002612
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10423
      1. Author :
        Orihuela, Carlos J; Gao, Geli; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Tuomanen, Elaine I
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of infectious diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        190
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        1661-1669
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacteremia; Bacterial Proteins; Cerebrospinal Fluid; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Lung; Meningitis, Pneumococcal; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mutation; N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase; Nasopharynx; Neuraminidase; Pneumococcal Infections; Pneumonia, Pneumococcal; Pyruvate Oxidase; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Streptolysins; Virulence Factors; Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        We assessed the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants deficient in either choline binding protein A (CbpA), pneumolysin (Pln), pyruvate oxidase (SpxB), autolysin (LytA), pneumococcal surface protein A, or neuraminidase A (NanA) to replicate in distinct anatomical sites and translocate from one site to the next. Intranasal, intratracheal, and intravenous models of disease were assessed in 4-week-old BALB/cJ mice by quantitation of bacterial titers in the relevant organs. Mice were also observed by use of real-time bioluminescent imaging (BLI). BLI allowed visualization of the bacteria in sites not tested by sampling. All mutants were created in D39 Xen7, a fully virulent derivative of capsular type 2 strain D39 that contains an optimized luxABCDE cassette. NanA, SpxB, and, to a lesser extent, CbpA contributed to prolonged nasopharyngeal colonization, whereas CbpA and NanA contributed to the transition to the lower respiratory tract. Once lung infection was established, Pln, SpxB, and LytA contributed to bacterial replication in the lungs and translocation to the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, only Pln and LytA were required for high-titer replication, whereas CbpA was required for invasion of the cerebrospinal fluid. We conclude that transitions between body sites require virulence determinants distinct from those involved in organ-specific replication.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15478073
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10002
      1. Author :
        Lin, S. A.; Patel, M.; Suresch, D.; Connolly, B.; Bao, B.; Groves, K.; Rajopadhye, M.; Peterson, J. D.; Klimas, M.; Sur, C.; Bednar, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Mol Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2012
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        189254
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        FMT, Prosense, CatB, Cathepsin B, fluorescence imaing, tomography, microCT
      12. Abstract :
        Inflammation as a core pathological event of atherosclerotic lesions is associated with the secretion of cathepsin proteases and the expression of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin. We employed fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) noninvasive imaging of these molecular activities using cathepsin sensing (ProSense, CatB FAST) and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin (IntegriSense) near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) agents. A statistically significant increase in the ProSense and IntegriSense signal was observed within the chest region of apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05) versus C57BL/6 mice starting 25 and 22 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. In a treatment study using ezetimibe (7 mg/kg), there was a statistically significant reduction in the ProSense and CatB FAST chest signal of treated (P < 0.05) versus untreated apoE(-/-) mice at 31 and 21 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. The signal of ProSense and CatB FAST correlated with macrophage counts and was found associated with inflammatory cells by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry of cells dissociated from aortas. This report demonstrates that cathepsin and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin NIRF agents can be used as molecular imaging biomarkers for longitudinal detection of atherosclerosis, and cathepsin agents can monitor anti-inflammatory effects of ezetimibe with applications in preclinical testing of therapeutics and potentially for early diagnosis of atherosclerosis in patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23119157
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10571
      1. Author :
        Lee, S. K.; Han, M. S.; Asokan, S.; Tung, C. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Small
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        364-70
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        LnCaP-luc2, Prostate Cancer, IVIS, *Gene Silencing; *Gold; Metal Nanoparticles/*chemistry/ultrastructure; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission; Polylysine/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/*genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been widely proposed to treat various diseases by silencing genes, but its delivery remains a challenge. A well controlled assembly approach is applied to prepare a protease-assisted nanodelivery system. Protease-degradable poly-L-lysine (PLL) and siRNA are fabricated onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), by alternating the charged polyelectrolytes. In this study, up to 4 layers of PLL and 3 layers of siRNA (sR3P) are coated. Due to the slow degradation of PLL, the incorporated siRNA is released gradually and shows extended gene-silencing effects. Importantly, the inhibition effect in cells is found to correlate with the number of siRNA layers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21294265
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10547
      1. Author :
        Chen, J.; Gallo, K. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        4130-40
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2-tdtomato, IVIS, tdtomato, fluorescent protein, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/enzymology/*metabolism/*pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement/*physiology; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism; Female; Humans; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/*metabolism; MAP Kinase Signaling System; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Paxillin/*metabolism; Phosphorylation
      12. Abstract :
        MLK3 kinase activates multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases and plays a critical role in cancer cell migration and invasion. In the tumor microenvironment, prometastatic factors drive breast cancer invasion and metastasis, but their associated signaling pathways are not well-known. Here, we provide evidence that MLK3 is required for chemokine (CXCL12)-induced invasion of basal breast cancer cells. We found that MLK3 induced robust phosphorylation of the focal adhesion scaffold paxillin on Ser 178 and Tyr 118, which was blocked by silencing or inhibition of MLK3-JNK. Silencing or inhibition of MLK3, inhibition of JNK, or expression of paxillin S178A all led to enhanced Rho activity, indicating that the MLK3-JNK-paxillin axis limits Rho activity to promote focal adhesion turnover and migration. Consistent with this, MLK3 silencing increased focal adhesions and stress fibers in breast cancer cells. MLK3 silencing also decreased the formation of breast cancer lung metastases in vivo, and breast cancer cells derived from mouse lung metastases showed enhanced Ser 178 paxillin phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the MLK3-JNK-paxillin signaling axis may represent a potential therapeutic target and/or prognostic marker in breast cancer metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700880
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10495