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      1. Author :
        Lambrechts, Saskia A G; Demidova, Tatiana N; Aalders, Maurice C G; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Burns; Mice; Photochemotherapy; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell death. We used PDT mediated by meso-mono-phenyl-tri(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (PTMPP) to treat burn wounds in mice with established Staphylococcus aureus infections The third degree burn wounds were infected with bioluminescent S. aureus. PDT was applied after one day of bacterial growth by adding a 25% DMSO/500 microM PTMPP solution to the wound followed by illumination with red light and periodic imaging of the mice using a sensitive camera to detect the bioluminescence. More than 98% of the bacteria were eradicated after a light dose of 210 J cm(-2) in the presence of PTMPP. However, bacterial re-growth was observed. Light alone or PDT both delayed the wound healing. These data suggest that PDT has the potential to rapidly reduce the bacterial load in infected burns. The treatment needs to be optimized to reduce wound damage and prevent recurrence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15986057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9993
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cattle; Cells, Cultured; Cystic Fibrosis; Flavoproteins; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Immunity, Innate; Immunity, Mucosal; Lactoperoxidase; Lung Diseases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Rats; Reactive Oxygen Species; Respiratory Mucosa; RNA, Small Interfering; Staphylococcus aureus; Thiocyanates; Trachea; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        RATIONALE The respiratory tract is constantly exposed to airborne microorganisms. Nevertheless, normal airways remain sterile without recruiting phagocytes. This innate immune activity has been attributed to mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial polypeptides of airway surface liquid. Defective airway immunity characterizes cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a chloride channel. The pathophysiology of defective immunity in CF remains to be elucidated. OBJECTIVE We investigated the ability of non-CF and CF airway epithelia to kill bacteria through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). METHODS ROS production and ROS-mediated bactericidal activity were determined on the apical surfaces of human and rat airway epithelia and on cow tracheal explants. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Dual oxidase enzyme of airway epithelial cells generated sufficient H(2)O(2) to support production of bactericidal hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the presence of airway surface liquid components lactoperoxidase and thiocyanate (SCN(-)). This OSCN(-) formation eliminated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway mucosal surfaces, whereas it was nontoxic to the host. In contrast to normal epithelia, CF epithelia failed to secrete SCN(-), thereby rendering the oxidative antimicrobial system inactive. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate a novel innate defense mechanism of airways that kills bacteria via ROS and suggest a new cellular and molecular basis for defective airway immunity in CF.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17082494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9988
      1. Author :
        Shi, Lei; Takahashi, Kazue; Dundee, Joseph; Shahroor-Karni, Sarit; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Gad, Faten; Hamblin, Michael R; Sastry, Kedarnath N; Ezekowitz, R Alan B
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of experimental medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        199
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Disease Susceptibility; DNA, Bacterial; Lung; Mannose-Binding Lectin; Mice; Mice, Knockout; Reference Values; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Spleen; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Gram-positive organisms like Staphylococcus aureus are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Humoral response molecules together with phagocytes play a role in host responses to S. aureus. The mannose-binding lectin (MBL, also known as mannose-binding protein) is an oligomeric serum molecule that recognizes carbohydrates decorating a broad range of infectious agents including S. aureus. Circumstantial evidence in vitro and in vivo suggests that MBL plays a key role in first line host defense. We tested this contention directly in vivo by generating mice that were devoid of all MBL activity. We found that 100% of MBL-null mice died 48 h after exposure to an intravenous inoculation of S. aureus compared with 45% mortality in wild-type mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that neutrophils and MBL are required to limit intraperitoneal infection with S. aureus. Our study provides direct evidence that MBL plays a key role in restricting the complications associated with S. aureus infection in mice and raises the idea that the MBL gene may act as a disease susceptibility gene against staphylococci infections in humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15148336
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9994
      1. Author :
        Pozo, J. L. del; Rouse, M. S.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Sampedro, M. F.; Steckelberg, J. M.; Patel, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen30, Xen5, Xen41
      12. Abstract :
        Bacterial biofilms are resistant to conventional antimicrobial agents. Prior in vitro studies have shown that electrical current (EC) enhances the activities of aminoglycosides, quinolones, and oxytetracycline against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus gordonii. This phenomenon, known as the bioelectric effect, has been only partially defined. The purpose of this work was to study the in vitro bioelectric effect on the activities of 11 antimicrobial agents representing a variety of different classes against P. aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and S. epidermidis. An eight-channel current generator/controller and eight chambers delivering a continuous flow of fresh medium with or without antimicrobial agents and/or EC to biofilm-coated coupons were used. No significant decreases in the numbers of log10 CFU/cm2 were seen after exposure to antimicrobial agents alone, with the exception of a 4.57-log-unit reduction for S. epidermidis and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. We detected a statistically significant bioelectric effect when vancomycin plus 2,000 microamperes EC were used against MRSA biofilms (P = 0.04) and when daptomycin and erythromycin were used in combination with 200 or 2,000 microamperes EC against S. epidermidis biofilms (P = 0.02 and 0.0004, respectively). The results of these experiments indicate that the enhancement of the activity of antimicrobial agents against biofilm organisms by EC is not a generalizable phenomenon across microorganisms and antimicrobial agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18725436
      14. Call Number :
        137347
      15. Serial :
        5991
      1. Author :
        Pozo, J. L. del; Rouse, M. S.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Steckelberg, J. M.; Patel, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aza Compounds/pharmacology, Biofilms/drug effects/*growth & development, Electricity/*adverse effects, Pseudomonas/drug effects/*growth & development, Quinolines/pharmacology, Staphylococcus/drug effects/*growth & development, Tobramycin/pharmacology IVIS, Xenogen, Xen30
      12. Abstract :
        The activity of electrical current against planktonic bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The short-term exposure of the bacteria in biofilms to electrical current in the absence of antimicrobials has been shown to have no substantial effect; however, longer-term exposure has not been studied. A previously described in vitro model was used to determine the effect of prolonged exposure (i.e., up to 7 days) to low-intensity (i.e., 20-, 200-, and 2,000-microampere) electrical direct currents on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. Dose- and time-dependent killing was observed. A maximum of a 6-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. epidermidis biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. A 4- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. aureus biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. Finally, a 3.5- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when P. aeruginosa biofilms were exposed to electrical current for 7 days. A higher electrical current intensity correlated with greater decreases in viable bacteria at all time points studied. In conclusion, low-intensity electrical current substantially reduced the numbers of viable bacteria in staphylococcal or Pseudomonas biofilms, a phenomenon we have labeled the “electricidal effect.”
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18955534
      14. Call Number :
        137350
      15. Serial :
        7845
      1. Author :
        Dai, T.; Tegos, G. P.; Burkatovskaya, M.; Castano, A. P.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        An engineered chitosan acetate bandage preparation (HemCon) is used as a hemostatic dressing, and its chemical structure suggests that it should also be antimicrobial. We previously showed that when a chitosan acetate bandage was applied to full-thickness excisional wounds in mice that had been infected with pathogenic bioluminescent bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus), it was able to rapidly kill the bacteria and save the mice from developing fatal infections. Wound healing was also stimulated. In the present study, we asked whether a chitosan acetate bandage could act as a topical antimicrobial dressing when it was applied to third-degree burns in mice contaminated with two of these bacterial species (P. aeruginosa and P. mirabilis). Preliminary experiments established the length of burn time and the number of bacteria needed to produce fatal infections in untreated mice and established that the chitosan acetate bandage could adhere to the infected burn for up to 21 days. In the case of P. aeruginosa infections, the survival rate of mice treated with the chitosan acetate bandage was 73.3% (whereas the survival rate of mice treated with a nanocrystalline silver dressing was 27.3% [P = 0.0055] and that of untreated mice was 13.3% [P < 0.0002]). For P. mirabilis infections, the comparable survival rates were 66.7%, 62.5%, and 23.1% respectively. Quantitative bioluminescent signals showed that the chitosan acetate bandage effectively controlled the growth of bacteria in the burn and prevented the development of systemic sepsis, as shown by blood culture. These data suggest that chitosan acetate bandage is efficacious in preventing fatal burn infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19015341
      14. Call Number :
        137209
      15. Serial :
        5713
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, R. T.; Blackwell, T. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Methods Mol Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        477
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenoviridae/genetics, Anesthesia, Animals, Firefly Luciferin/administration & dosage/pharmacology, *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects, Genetic Vectors/genetics, Luciferases/metabolism, Luminescent Measurements/*methods, Mice, Photons, Whole Body Imaging/*methods IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging offers many unique opportunities to study biological processes in intact organisms. Bioluminescence is the emission of light from biochemical reactions that occur within a living organism. Luciferase has been used as a reporter gene in transgenic mice but, until bioluminescence imaging was described, the detection of luciferase activity required either sectioning of the animal or excision of tissue and homogenization to measure enzyme activities in a conventional luminometer. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is based on the idea that biological light sources can be incorporated into cells and animal models artificially that does not naturally express the luminescent genes. This imaging modality has proven to be a very powerful methodology to detect luciferase reporter activity in intact animal models. This form of optical imaging is low cost and noninvasive and facilitates real-time analysis of disease processes at the molecular level in living organisms. Bioluminescence provides a noninvasive method to monitor gene expression in vivo and has enormous potential to elucidate the pathobiology of lung diseases in intact mouse models, including models of inflammation/injury, infection, and cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19082962
      14. Call Number :
        142705
      15. Serial :
        5558
      1. Author :
        Apidianakis, Y.; Mindrinos, M. N.; Xiao, W.; Tegos, G. P.; Papisov, M. I.; Hamblin, M. R.; Davis, R. W.; Tompkins, R. G.; Rahme, L. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in our understanding the pathophysiology of trauma, the basis of the predisposition of trauma patients to infection remains unclear. A Drosophila melanogaster/Pseudomonas aeruginosa injury and infection model was used to identify host genetic components that contribute to the hyper-susceptibility to infection that follows severe trauma. We show that P. aeruginosa compromises skeletal muscle gene (SMG) expression at the injury site to promote infection. We demonstrate that activation of SMG structural components is under the control of cJun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Kinase, Hemipterous (Hep), and activation of this pathway promotes local resistance to P. aeruginosa in flies and mice. Our study links SMG expression and function to increased susceptibility to infection, and suggests that P. aeruginosa affects SMG homeostasis locally by restricting SMG expression in injured skeletal muscle tissue. Local potentiation of these host responses, and/or inhibition of their suppression by virulent P. aeruginosa cells, could lead to novel therapies that prevent or treat deleterious and potentially fatal infections in severely injured individuals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18159239
      14. Call Number :
        135889
      15. Serial :
        6705
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