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      1. Author :
        Pozo, J. L. del; Rouse, M. S.; Mandrekar, J. N.; Steckelberg, J. M.; Patel, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aza Compounds/pharmacology, Biofilms/drug effects/*growth & development, Electricity/*adverse effects, Pseudomonas/drug effects/*growth & development, Quinolines/pharmacology, Staphylococcus/drug effects/*growth & development, Tobramycin/pharmacology IVIS, Xenogen, Xen30
      12. Abstract :
        The activity of electrical current against planktonic bacteria has previously been demonstrated. The short-term exposure of the bacteria in biofilms to electrical current in the absence of antimicrobials has been shown to have no substantial effect; however, longer-term exposure has not been studied. A previously described in vitro model was used to determine the effect of prolonged exposure (i.e., up to 7 days) to low-intensity (i.e., 20-, 200-, and 2,000-microampere) electrical direct currents on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. Dose- and time-dependent killing was observed. A maximum of a 6-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. epidermidis biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. A 4- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when S. aureus biofilms were exposed to 2,000 microamperes for at least 2 days. Finally, a 3.5- to 5-log(10)-CFU/cm(2) reduction was observed when P. aeruginosa biofilms were exposed to electrical current for 7 days. A higher electrical current intensity correlated with greater decreases in viable bacteria at all time points studied. In conclusion, low-intensity electrical current substantially reduced the numbers of viable bacteria in staphylococcal or Pseudomonas biofilms, a phenomenon we have labeled the “electricidal effect.”
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=18955534
      14. Call Number :
        137350
      15. Serial :
        7845
      1. Author :
        Daugimont, L.; Vandermeulen, G.; Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Mir, L. M.; Bouquet, C.; Feron, O.; Preat, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Pharm Biopharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        78
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Despite the discovery of novel inhibitors of tumor angiogenesis, protein-based antiangiogenic cancer therapy suffers some limitations that antiangiogenic gene therapy could overcome. We investigated whether intra-tumoral electrotransfer of three angiogenic plasmids could inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. METHODS: Plasmids encoding recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM-15 (RDD), thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1), and the soluble isoform of the VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) were injected into B16F10 melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 mice followed by electroporation. Tumor volume was measured daily using a digital caliper. Metastasis was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence after surgical removal of the primary luciferase-encoding B16F10 tumor 5 days after intra-tumoral electrotransfer. Markers of vascularization and cell proliferation were quantified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the antiangiogenic plasmids induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, doubling of mean survival time and long-term survivors ( approximately 40% vs 0% in control). When the tumor was removed by surgery after intra-tumoral plasmid electrotransfer, a significant decrease in tumor metastasis was observed leading to long-term tumor-free survival especially after treatment with pRDD plasmid (84% vs 0% in control). Unlike pTSP-1 and psFlt-1, pRDD significantly decreased cell proliferation in B16F10 primary tumors which express alphavbeta3 and alpha5beta1 integrins. No effect of antiangiogenic plasmid electrotransfer on normal skin blood flow was detected. CONCLUSION: The intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the three antiangiogenic plasmids is a promising method for the treatment of melanoma. The plasmid encoding RDD seems to be particularly effective due to its direct antitumoral activity combined with angiogenesis suppression, and its marked inhibition of metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21316447
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10353
      1. Author :
        Albanesi, M.; Mancardi, D. A.; Macdonald, L. E.; Iannascoli, B.; Zitvogel, L.; Murphy, A. J.; Leusen, J. H.; Bruhns, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        mAb therapy for experimental metastatic melanoma relies on activating receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcgammaR). Opposing results on the respective contribution of mouse FcgammaRI, FcgammaRIII, and FcgammaRIV have been reported using the gp75-expressing B16 melanoma and the protective anti-gp75 mAb TA99. We analyzed the contribution of FcgammaRs to this therapy model using bioluminescent measurement of lung metastases loads, novel mouse strains, and anti-FcgammaR blocking mAbs. We found that the TA99 mAb-mediated effects in a combination therapy using cyclophosphamide relied on activating FcgammaRs. The combination therapy, however, was not more efficient than mAb therapy alone. We demonstrate that FcgammaRI and, unexpectedly, FcgammaRIII contributed to TA99 mAb therapeutic effects, whereas FcgammaRIV did not. Therefore, FcgammaRIII and FcgammaRI are, together, responsible for anti-gp75 mAb therapy of B16 lung metastases. Our finding that mouse FcgammaRIII contributes to Ab-induced tumor reduction correlates with clinical data on its human functional equivalent human FcgammaRIIIA (CD16A).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23150715
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10482
      1. Author :
        Danussi, C.; Petrucco, A.; Wassermann, B.; Modica, T. M.; Pivetta, E.; Del Bel Belluz, L.; Colombatti, A.; Spessotto, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        The evidence that EMILIN1 (Elastic Microfibril Interface Located proteIN) deficiency in Emilin1(-/-) mice caused dermal and epidermal hyperproliferation and an abnormal lymphatic phenotype prompted us to hypothesize the involvement of this extracellular matrix component in tumor development and in lymphatic metastasis. Using the 12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (DMBA/TPA) two-stage model of skin carcinogenesis, we found that Emilin1(-/-) mice presented an accelerated formation, a higher incidence, and the development of a larger number of tumors compared with their wild-type littermates. EMILIN1-negative tumors showed more Ki67-positive proliferating cells and higher levels of pErk1/2. In these tumors, PTEN expression was lower. Emilin1(-/-) mice displayed enhanced lymphangiogenesis both in the tumor and in the sentinel lymph nodes. Accordingly, tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of transplanted syngenic tumors were also increased in Emilin1(-/-) mice. In vitro transmigration assays through lymphatic endothelial cells showed that EMILIN1 deficiency greatly facilitated tumor cell trafficking. Overall, these data established that EMILIN1 exerts a protective role in tumor growth, in tumor lymphatic vessel formation, as well as in metastatic spread to lymph nodes and reinforced the importance of its presence in the microenvironment to determine the tumor phenotype.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22827975
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10483
      1. Author :
        Oashi, K.; Furukawa, H.; Nishihara, H.; Ozaki, M.; Oyama, A.; Funayama, E.; Hayashi, T.; Kuge, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Invest Dermatol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, Melanoma, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        In-transit metastasis (ITM) is a unique manifestation of intralymphatic tumor dissemination, characterized by the presence of melanoma cells between the primary lesion and the draining regional lymph node basin that is clinically associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we aimed to establish an experimental animal model of melanoma ITM, as research progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of suitable experimental models. We reproduced melanoma ITM in a mouse hind limb by transplanting melanoma cells into the footpad of a mouse with lymphedema (LE). The tumor cells at the ITM site were highly proliferative, and mice with ITMs were more likely than control mice to develop distant lymph node and lung metastases. Peritumoral lymphatic vessels and tumor-associated blood vessels were increased in the primary tumor site of the LE mice. Our established ITM melanoma mouse model enabled us to clarify the molecular determinants and pathophysiology of ITM. This ITM model is also comparable to the unfavorable clinical behavior of melanoma ITM in humans and, moreover, underlined the importance of lymphangiogenic factors in the tumor dissemination through the lymphatic system.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 6 September 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.274.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22951727
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10501
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Acta biomaterialia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bacterial Adhesion; Biocompatible Materials; Biofilms; Bioware; Coated Materials, Biocompatible; Materials Testing; Polyethylene Glycols; Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus epidermidis; Surface Properties; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings are known to reduce microbial adhesion in terms of numbers and binding strength. However, bacterial adhesion remains of the order of 10(4)cm(-2). It is unknown whether this density of bacteria will eventually grow into a biofilm. This study investigates the kinetics of staphylococcal biofilm formation on a commercially produced, robust, cross-linked PEG-based polymer coating (OptiChem) in vitro and in vivo. OptiChem inhibits biofilm formation in vitro, and although adsorption of plasma proteins encourages biofilm formation, microbial growth kinetics are still strongly delayed compared to uncoated glass. In vivo, OptiChem-coated and bare silicone rubber samples were inserted into an infected murine subcutaneous pocket model. In contrast to bare silicone rubber, OptiChem samples did not become colonized upon reimplantation despite the fact that surrounding tissues were always culture-positive. We conclude that the commercial OptiChem coating considerably slows down bacterial biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, making it an attractive candidate for biomaterials implant coating.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19733265
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9041
      1. Author :
        Yamaoka, Ippei; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Endo, Naoyuki; Ebisu, Goro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2014
      5. Publication :
        BMC gastroenterology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        BALB/c CrSlc mice; enteral nutrition; Ex vivo; Gastrosense 750; Hine® E-gel; in vivo; IVIS® Spectrum; Nev11121; pectin
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Semi-solidification by gelation or increased viscosity could slow the influx of liquid enteral nutrition (EN) into the small intestine. A liquid EN formula containing pectin that gels under acidic conditions such as those found in the stomach has been developed. A new near-infrared fluorescent imaging reagent was used to non-invasively acquire real time images of gastric emptying in a murine model in vivo. We postulated that the EN formula delays gastric emptying and tested this hypothesis using imaging in vivo.
        METHODS: Male BALB/c mice were given an oral bolus injection of a liquid EN containing the fluorescence reagent GastroSense750 with or without pectin. The EN in the stomach was visualized in vivo at various intervals using a non-invasive live imaging system and fluorescent signals were monitored from the stomach, which was removed at 60 min after EN ingestion.
        RESULTS: The fluorescence intensity of signals in stomachs in vivo and in resected stomachs was lower and attenuated over time in mice given EN without, than with pectin.
        CONCLUSIONS: Adding a gelling agent such as pectin delayed the transit of liquid EN from the stomach. Fluorescence imaging can visualize the delayed gastric emptying of EN containing pectin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25263497
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        11641
      1. Author :
        Thomas Reiner, Rainer H. Kohler, Chong Wee Liew, Jonathan Hill, Jason Gaglia, Rohit Kulkarni and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        21
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Metabolic Disorders
      11. Keywords :
        Beta-cells; GLP1-R; imaging; targeting; in vivo imaging; VivoTag; AngioSense; Diabetes
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to image and ultimately quantitate beta-cell mass in vivo will likely have far reaching implications in the study of diabetes biology, in the monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment, as well as for drug development. Here, using animal models, we report on the synthesis, characterization of, and intravital microscopic imaging properties of a near infrared fluorescent exendin-4 analogue with specificity for the GLP-1 receptor on beta cells (E4K12-Fl). The agent demonstrated sub-nanomolar EC50 binding concentrations, with high specificity and binding could be inhibited by GLP-1R agonists. Following intravenous administration to mice, pancreatic islets were readily distinguishable from exocrine pancreas, achieving target-to-background ratios within the pancreas of 6:1, as measured by intravital microscopy. Serial imaging revealed rapid accumulation kinetics (with initial signal within the islets detectable within 3 minutes and peak fluorescence within 20 minutes of injection) making this an ideal agent for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912453/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4561
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