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      1. Author :
        Stan, Silvia D; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Warin, Renaud; Singh, Shivendra V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        68
      8. Issue :
        18
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; Apoptosis; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Growth Processes; Cell Line, Tumor; Ergosterol; Female; Forkhead Transcription Factors; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Membrane Proteins; Mice; Mice, Nude; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; RNA, Small Interfering; Transfection; Withanolides; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Withaferin A (WA) is derived from the medicinal plant Withania somnifera, which has been safely used for centuries in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for treatment of different ailments. We now show, for the first time, that WA exhibits significant activity against human breast cancer cells in culture and in vivo. The WA treatment decreased viability of MCF-7 (estrogen-responsive) and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen-independent) human breast cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The WA-mediated suppression of breast cancer cell viability correlated with apoptosis induction characterized by DNA condensation, cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation, and cleavage of poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase. On the other hand, a spontaneously immortalized normal mammary epithelial cell line (MCF-10A) was relatively more resistant to WA-induced apoptosis compared with breast cancer cells. The WA-mediated apoptosis was accompanied by induction of Bim-s and Bim-L in MCF-7 cells and induction of Bim-s and Bim-EL isoforms in MDA-MB-231 cells. The cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragmentation resulting from WA exposure was significantly attenuated by knockdown of protein levels of Bim and its transcriptional regulator FOXO3a in both cell lines. Moreover, FOXO3a knockdown conferred marked protection against WA-mediated induction of Bim-s expression. The growth of MDA-MB-231 cells implanted in female nude mice was significantly retarded by 5 weekly i.p. injections of 4 mg WA/kg body weight. The tumors from WA-treated mice exhibited reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis compared with tumors from control mice. These results point toward an important role of FOXO3a and Bim in regulation of WA-mediated apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18794155
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8990
      1. Author :
        Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Hasako, Shinichi; Nakatsuru, Yoko; Mita, Takashi; Ichikawa, Koji; Kodera, Tsutomu; Sakai, Takumi; Nambu, Tadahiro; Miyamoto, Mayu; Takahashi, Ikuko; Miki, Satomi; Kawanishi, Nobuhiko; Ohkubo, Mitsuru; Kotani, Hidehito; Iwasawa, Yoshikazu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids; HeLa-luc; Humans; Inhibitory Concentration 50; Mice; Mitosis; Protein kinase inhibitors; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; Rats; Taxoids; Thiazoles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Aurora-A kinase is a one of the key regulators during mitosis progression. Aurora-A kinase is a potential target for anticancer therapies because overexpression of Aurora-A, which is frequently observed in some human cancers, results in aberrant mitosis leading to chromosomal instability and possibly tumorigenesis. MK-5108 is a novel small molecule with potent inhibitory activity against Aurora-A kinase. Although most of the Aurora-kinase inhibitors target both Aurora-A and Aurora-B, MK-5108 specifically inhibited Aurora-A kinase in a panel of protein kinase assays. Inhibition of Aurora-A by MK-5108 in cultured cells induced cell cycle arrest at the G(2)-M phase in flow cytometry analysis. The effect was confirmed by the accumulation of cells with expression of phosphorylated Histone H3 and inhibition of Aurora-A autophosphorylation by immunostaining assays. MK-5108 also induced phosphorylated Histone H3 in skin and xenograft tumor tissues in a nude rat xenograft model. MK-5108 inhibited growth of human tumor cell lines in culture and in different xenograft models. Furthermore, the combination of MK-5108 and docetaxel showed enhanced antitumor activities compared with control and docetaxel alone-treated animals without exacerbating the adverse effects of docetaxel. MK-5108 is currently tested in clinical trials and offers a new therapeutic approach to combat human cancers as a single agent or in combination with existing taxane therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20053775
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9006
      1. Author :
        Sharma, Praveen K; Singh, Rajesh; Novakovic, Kristian R; Eaton, John W; Grizzle, William E; Singh, Shailesh
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        127
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Chemokines, CC; Disease Progression; Enzyme Activation; Etoposide; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; PC-3M-luc; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Prostatic Neoplasms; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; Receptors, CCR; Signal Transduction
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in treatment and management of prostate cancer (PCa), it remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the US. Chemotherapy is one of the treatment alternatives for hormone refractory metastatic PCa. However, current chemotherapeutic regimens provide palliative benefit but relatively modest survival advantage primarily due to chemo-resistance and upregulated antiapoptotic machineries in PCa cells. Therefore, blocking the mechanisms responsible for suppression of apoptosis might improve current chemotherapeutic regimens. In this study, we show that CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) and its natural ligand CCL25 interaction upregulates antiapoptotic proteins (i.e., PI3K, AKT, ERK1/2 and GSK-3beta) and downregulate activation of caspase-3 in PCa cells. Significant downregulation of these CCR9-mediated antiapoptotic proteins in the presence of a PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin), further suggests that the antiapoptotic action of CCR9 is primarily regulated through PI3K. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of etoposide was significantly inhibited in the presence of CCL25, and this inhibitory effect of CCL25 was abrogated when CCR9-CCL25 interaction was blocked using anti-CCR9 monoclonal antibodies. In conformation to these in vitro studies, significant reduction in tumor burden was found in mice receiving CCL25 neutralizing antibodies and etoposide together as compared to both as a single agent. These results suggest that the CCR9-CCL25 axis mediates PI3K/AKT-dependent antiapoptotic signals in PCa cells and could be a possible reason for low apoptosis and modest chemotherapeutic response. Therefore, targeting CCR9-CCL25 axis with cytotoxic agents may provide better therapeutic outcomes than using cytotoxic agents alone.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20127861
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8945
      1. Author :
        Hickson, J; Ackler, S; Klaubert, D; Bouska, J; Ellis, P; Foster, K; Oleksijew, A; Rodriguez, L; Schlessinger, S; Wang, B; Frost, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cell death and differentiation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Firefly Luciferin; Humans; Luminescent Agents; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Molecular Imaging; Neoplasms; Oligopeptides; Taxoids
      12. Abstract :
        Apoptosis is a highly regulated process of programmed cell death essential for normal physiology. Dysregulation of apoptosis contributes to the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and chronic heart failure. Quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis in preclinical models would allow for dynamic longitudinal screening of compounds and facilitates a more rapid determination of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we report the in vivo characterization of Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin, a modified firefly luciferase substrate that in apoptotic cells is cleaved by caspase-3 to liberate aminoluciferin, which can be consumed by luciferase to generate a luminescent signal. In two oncology models, namely SKOV3-luc and MDA-MB-231-luc-LN, at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment with docetaxel, animals were injected with Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin and bioluminescent images were acquired. Significantly more light was detected at 24 (P<0.05), 48 (P<0.01), and 72 h (P<0.01) in the docetaxel-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group, with caspase-3 activation at these time points confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Importantly, whereas significant differences between groups were detected as early as 24 h after treatment by molecular imaging, caliper measurements were unable to detect a difference for 4-5 additional days. Taken together, these data show that in vivo imaging of apoptosis using Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin could provide a sensitive and rapid method for early detection of drug efficacy, which could potentially be used by numerous therapeutic programs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20057500
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8950
      1. Author :
        Smith, Eric L; Schuchman, Edward H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Molecular therapy: the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        16
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Autophagy; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Survival; Cells, Cultured; Ceramides; Cesium Radioisotopes; CHO Cells; Combined Modality Therapy; Cricetinae; Cricetulus; Endothelium, Vascular; Female; Gamma Rays; Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic; Gene Therapy; Humans; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase
      12. Abstract :
        Exposure of cells or animals to stress frequently induces acid sphingomyelinase (ASM)-mediated ceramide production that leads to cell death. Consistent with this, overexpression of ASM in subcutaneous B16-F10 mouse melanomas, in combination with irradiation, resulted in tumors that were up to 12-fold smaller than irradiated control melanomas. Similarly, when irradiated melanomas were pretreated with a single, peritumoral injection of recombinant ASM (rhASM), the tumors were up to threefold smaller. The in vivo effect of ASM was likely due to enhanced cell death of the tumor cells themselves, as well as the surrounding microvascular endothelial cells. In vitro, rhASM had little or no effect on the growth of tumor cells, even in combination with irradiation. However, when the culture media was acidified to mimic the acidic microenvironment of solid tumors, rhASM-mediated cell death was markedly enhanced when combined with irradiation. Microscopic analysis suggested that this was associated with an increase in autophagy. rhASM has been produced for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder, type B Niemann-Pick disease, and is currently being evaluated in a phase-1 clinical trial. Based on the data presented in this article, we propose that further investigation of this protein and gene as antineoplastic agents also is warranted.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18628757
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8999
      1. Author :
        Holland, Sacha J; Pan, Alison; Franci, Christian; Hu, Yuanming; Chang, Betty; Li, Weiqun; Duan, Matt; Torneros, Allan; Yu, Jiaxin; Heckrodt, Thilo J; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Pingyu; Apatira, Ayodele; Chua, Joanne; Brandt, Ralf; Pine, Polly; Goff, Dane; Singh, Rajinder; Payan, Donald G; Hitoshi, Yasumichi
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Benzocycloheptenes; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Carcinoma; Female; Hela Cells; Humans; K562 Cells; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Neoplasm Metastasis; Oncogene Proteins; Protein kinase inhibitors; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; Survival Analysis; Triazoles; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Accumulating evidence suggests important roles for the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl in cancer progression, invasion, metastasis, drug resistance, and patient mortality, highlighting Axl as an attractive target for therapeutic development. We have generated and characterized a potent and selective small-molecule inhibitor, R428, that blocks the catalytic and procancerous activities of Axl. R428 inhibits Axl with low nanomolar activity and blocked Axl-dependent events, including Akt phosphorylation, breast cancer cell invasion, and proinflammatory cytokine production. Pharmacologic investigations revealed favorable exposure after oral administration such that R428-treated tumors displayed a dose-dependent reduction in expression of the cytokine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcriptional regulator Snail. In support of an earlier study, R428 inhibited angiogenesis in corneal micropocket and tumor models. R428 administration reduced metastatic burden and extended survival in MDA-MB-231 intracardiac and 4T1 orthotopic (median survival, >80 days compared with 52 days; P < 0.05) mouse models of breast cancer metastasis. Additionally, R428 synergized with cisplatin to enhance suppression of liver micrometastasis. Our results show that Axl signaling regulates breast cancer metastasis at multiple levels in tumor cells and tumor stromal cells and that selective Axl blockade confers therapeutic value in prolonging survival of animals bearing metastatic tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20145120
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8949
      1. Author :
        Ranganath, Sudhir H; Fu, Yilong; Arifin, Davis Y; Kee, Irene; Zheng, Lin; Lee, How-Sung; Chow, Pierce K-H; Wang, Chi-Hwa
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        19
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Brain Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Implants; Glioblastoma; Male; Metabolic Clearance Rate; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nanostructures; Paclitaxel; Treatment Outcome; U-87 MG-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of submicron/nanoscale, intracranial implants were evaluated for treating malignant glioblastoma in mice. 9.1% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanofiber discs (F3) were fabricated and characterized for morphology and size distribution. Along with F3, three other formulations, 9.1% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded PLGA submicron-fiber discs (F2), 16.7% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded PLGA microspheres entrapped in hydrogel matrices (H80 and M80) were intracranially implanted in BALB/c mice and the coronal brain sections were analyzed for bio-distribution of paclitaxel on 14, 28 and 42 days post-implantation. BALB/c nude mice with intracranial human glioblastoma (U87 MG-luc2) were used in the therapeutic efficacy study. Animals were randomized to intracranial implantation of F3 and H80 with paclitaxel dose of 10mg/kg, placebo F3, placebo H80, weekly intratumoral injection of Taxol (10mg/kg) or no treatment and the treatment response was analyzed by bioluminescence imaging and histological (H&E, Ki-67) examinations. Enhanced, therapeutic paclitaxel penetration (approximately 1 microm) in the mouse brain up to 5mm from the implant site even after 42 days post-implantation from F3 and H80 was confirmed and deduced to be diffusion/elimination controlled. F3 and H80 demonstrated significant (approximately 30 fold) tumor inhibition and significantly low tumor proliferation index after 41 days of treatment in comparison to sham and placebo controls. The submicron/nanoscale implants are able to demonstrate optimal paclitaxel pharmacokinetics in the brain/tumor with significant tumor inhibition in a glioblastoma xenograft model in mice and hence could be potentially useful to treat highly recurrent GBM.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20350766
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8942
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E; Yu, Shang-Fan; Hornig, Yvette S; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Clinical & experimental metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Disease Models, Animal; Heart Neoplasms; Humans; Injections, Subcutaneous; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Lymphatic Metastasis; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms
      12. Abstract :
        We used the bioluminescent human prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3M-luc-C6 to non-invasively monitor in vivo growth and response of tumors and metastasis before, during and after treatments. Our goal was to determine the utility of a luciferase-based prostate cancer animal model to specifically assess tumor and metastatic recurrence in vivo following chemotherapy. Bioluminescent PC-3M-luc-C6 cells, constitutively expressing luciferase, were implanted into the prostate or under the skin of mice for primary tumor assessment. Cells were also injected into the left ventricle of the heart as an experimental metastasis model. Weekly serial in vivo images were taken of anesthetized mice that were untreated or treated with 5-fluorouracil or mitomycin C. Ex vivo imaging and/or histology was used to confirm and localize metastatic lesions in various tissues initially detected by images in vivo. Our in vivo data detected and quantified early inhibition of subcutaneous and orthotopic prostate tumors in mice as well as significant tumor regrowth post-treatment. Local and distal metastasis was observed within seven days following intracardiac injection of PC-3M-luc-C6 cells. Differential drug responses and metastatic tumor relapse patterns were distinguished over time by in vivo imaging depending on the metastatic site. The longitudinal evaluation of bioluminescent tumor and metastatic development within the same cohorts of animals permitted sensitive and quantitative assessment of both primary and metastatic prostate tumor response and recurrence in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14713108
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8981
      1. Author :
        Cabral, Horacio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of controlled release: official journal of the Controlled Release Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        121
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Hela Cells; HeLa-luc; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Micelles; Neoplasms; Organoplatinum Compounds; Platinum; Polymers; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Polymeric micelles are promising nanocarriers, which might enhance the efficacy of antitumor drugs. Herein, polymeric micelles incorporating dichloro(1,2-diamino-cyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt), the oxaliplatin parent complex, were prepared through the polymer-metal complex formation of DACHPt with poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(glutamic acid) [PEG-b-P(Glu)] block copolymer having different lengths of the poly(glutamic acid) block [p(Glu): 20, 40, and 70 U]. The resulting micelles were studied with the aim of optimizing the system's biological performance. DACHPt-loaded micelles (DACHPt/m) were approximately 40 nm in diameter and had a narrow size distribution. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor activity experiments (CDF1 mice bearing the murine colon adenocarcinoma C-26 inoculated subcutaneously) showed 20-fold greater accumulation of DACHPt/m at the tumor site than free oxaliplatin to achieve substantially higher antitumor efficacy. Moreover, the micelles prepared from PEG-b-P(Glu) with 20 U of P(Glu) exhibited the lowest non-specific accumulation in the liver and spleen to critically reduce non-specific accumulation, resulting in higher specificity to solid tumors. The antitumor effect of DACHPt/m was also evaluated on multiple metastases generated from intraperitoneally injected bioluminescent HeLa (HeLa-Luc) cells. The in vivo bioluminescent data indicated that DACHPt/m decreased the signal 10-to 50-fold compared to the control indicating a very strong antitumor activity. These results suggest that DACHPt/m could be an outstanding drug delivery system for oxaliplatin in the treatment of solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17628162
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9007
      1. Author :
        Zhang, H-Y; Man, J-H; Liang, B; Zhou, T; Wang, C-H; Li, T; Li, H-Y; Li, W-H; Jin, B-F; Zhang, P-J; Zhao, J; Pan, X; He, K; Gong, W-L; Zhang, X-M; Li, A-L
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer gene therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Apoptosis; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Escherichia coli; Female; Flow Cytometry; Gene Therapy; Genetic Vectors; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; NCI-H460-luc2; Neoplasms; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Survival Rate; TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand
      12. Abstract :
        The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent inducer of tumor cell apoptosis, but concerns of considerable liver toxicity limit its uses in human cancer therapy. Here, we show that i.v. injected Escherichia coli DH5alpha (E. coli DH5alpha) specifically replicates in solid tumors and metastases in live animals. E. coli DH5alpha does not enter tumor cells and suits for being the vector for soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL), which induces apoptosis by activating cell-surface death receptors. With the high 'tumor-targeting' nature, we demonstrate that intratumoral (i.t.) and intravenous injection of sTRAIL-expressing E. coli DH5alpha results in the tumor-targeted release of biologically active molecules, which leads to a dramatic reduction in the tumor growth rate and the prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. TRAIL delivery by E. coli DH5alpha did not cause any detectable toxicity to any organs, suggesting that E. coli DH5alpha-delivered sTRAIL protein therapy may provide a feasible and effective form of treatment for solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20075981
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8944
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