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      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U87-MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, U87MG-luc2, Bioluminescence, Glioma, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10424
      1. Author :
        Kwong, G. A.; von Maltzahn, G.; Murugappan, G.; Abudayyeh, O.; Mo, S.; Papayannopoulos, I. A.; Sverdlov, D. Y.; Liu, S. B.; Warren, A. D.; Popov, Y.; Schuppan, D.; Bhatia, S. N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Biotechnol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of complex diseases, yet our ability to discover new biomarkers remains limited by our dependence on endogenous molecules. Here we describe the development of exogenously administered 'synthetic biomarkers' composed of mass-encoded peptides conjugated to nanoparticles that leverage intrinsic features of human disease and physiology for noninvasive urinary monitoring. These protease-sensitive agents perform three functions in vivo: they target sites of disease, sample dysregulated protease activities and emit mass-encoded reporters into host urine for multiplexed detection by mass spectrometry. Using mouse models of liver fibrosis and cancer, we show that these agents can noninvasively monitor liver fibrosis and resolution without the need for invasive core biopsies and substantially improve early detection of cancer compared with current clinically used blood biomarkers. This approach of engineering synthetic biomarkers for multiplexed urinary monitoring should be broadly amenable to additional pathophysiological processes and point-of-care diagnostics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242163
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10567
      1. Author :
        Vujanovic, L.; Ballard, W.; Thorne, S. H.; Vujanovic, N. L.; Butterfield, L. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncoimmunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Recombinant adenovirus-engineered dendritic cells (Ad.DC) are potent vaccines for induction of anti-viral and anti-cancer T cell immunity. The effectiveness of Ad.DC vaccines may depend on the newly described ability of Ad.DC to crosstalk with natural killer (NK) cells via cell-to-cell contact, and to mediate activation, polarization and bridging of innate and adaptive immunity. For this interaction to occur in vivo, Ad.DC must be able to attract NK cells from surrounding tissues or peripheral blood. We developed a novel live mouse imaging system-based NK-cell migration test, and demonstrated for the first time that human Ad.DC induced directional migration of human NK cells across subcutaneous tissues, indicating that Ad.DC-NK cell contact and interaction could occur in vivo. We examined the mechanism of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Ad.DC produced multiple chemokines previously reported to recruit NK cells, including immunoregulatory CXCL10/IP-10 and proinflammatory CXCL8/IL-8. In vitro chemotaxis experiments utilizing neutralizing antibodies and recombinant human chemokines showed that CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL8/IL-8 were critical for Ad.DC-mediated recruitment of CD56(hi)CD16(-) and CD56(lo)CD16(+) NK cells, respectively. The importance of CXCL8/IL-8 was further demonstrated in vivo. Pretreatment of mice with the neutralizing anti-CXCL8/IL-8 antibody led to significant inhibition of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vivo. These data show that Ad.DC can recruit spatially distant NK cells toward a vaccine site via specific chemokines. Therefore, an Ad.DC vaccine can likely induce interaction with endogenous NK cells via transmembrane mediators, and consequently mediate Th1 polarization and amplification of immune functions in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22754763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10570
      1. Author :
        Tafreshi, N. K.; Bui, M. M.; Bishop, K.; Lloyd, M. C.; Enkemann, S. A.; Lopez, A. S.; Abrahams, D.; Carter, B. W.; Vagner, J.; Grobmyer, S. R.; Gillies, R. J.; Morse, D. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Clin Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*diagnostic use/immunology/pharmacokinetics; Antigens, Neoplasm/*metabolism; Blotting, Western; Breast/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carbonic Anhydrases/*metabolism; Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescent Antibody Technique; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Luciferases/metabolism; Luminescent Measurements; Lymphatic Metastasis; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; RNA, Messenger/genetics; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tissue Array Analysis; Tissue Distribution; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Tumor Markers, Biological/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the noninvasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis, and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX- and CAXII-specific monoclonal antibodies to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. RESULTS: Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice-bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker-expressing cells and nonexpressing cells or by preinjection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of lymph node metastases showed that peritumorally injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX- and CAXII-expressing cells into the axillary lymph nodes. CONCLUSION: These imaging probes have potential for noninvasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22016510
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10568
      1. Author :
        Goldberg, M. S.; Xing, D.; Ren, Y.; Orsulic, S.; Bhatia, S. N.; Sharp, P. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; BRCA1 Protein/*genetics; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Humans; Mice; Nanoparticles/*chemistry; Nanotechnology/methods; Neoplasm Transplantation; Ovarian Neoplasms/*genetics/*therapy; Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/*genetics; RNA Interference; RNA, Small Interfering/*metabolism; Treatment Outcome
      12. Abstract :
        Inhibition of the DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) with small molecules has been shown to be an effective treatment for ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. Here, we report the in vivo administration of siRNA to Parp1 in mouse models of ovarian cancer. A unique member of the lipid-like materials known as lipidoids is shown to deliver siRNA to disseminated murine ovarian carcinoma allograft tumors following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. siParp1 inhibits cell growth, primarily by induction of apoptosis, in Brca1-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the treatment extends the survival of mice bearing tumors derived from Brca1-deficient ovarian cancer cells but not from Brca1 wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Because there are 17 members of the Parp family, the inherent complementarity of RNA affords a high level of specificity for therapeutically addressing Parp1 in the context of impaired homologous recombination.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21187397
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10566
      1. Author :
        Xie, Chao; Liang, Bojian; Xue, Ming; Lin, Angela S.P.; Loiselle, Alayna; Schwarz, Edward M.; Guldberg, Robert E.; O'Keefe, Regis J.; Zhang, Xinping
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Am J Pathol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen10, Xen 10, Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Although the essential role of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in fracture healing is known, the targeted genes and molecular pathways remain unclear. Using prostaglandin E2 receptor (EP)2 and EP4 agonists, we examined the effects of EP receptor activation in compensation for the lack of COX-2 during fracture healing. In a fracture-healing model, COX-2-/- mice showed delayed initiation and impaired endochondral bone repair, accompanied by a severe angiogenesis deficiency. The EP4 agonist markedly improved the impaired healing in COX-2-/- mice, as evidenced by restoration of bony callus formation on day 14, a near complete reversal of bone formation, and an approximately 70% improvement of angiogenesis in the COX-2-/- callus. In comparison, the EP2 agonist only marginally enhanced bone formation in COX-2-/- mice. To determine the differential roles of EP2 and EP4 receptors on COX-2-mediated fracture repair, the effects of selective EP agonists on chondrogenesis were examined in E11.5 long-term limb bud micromass cultures. Only the EP4 agonist significantly increased cartilage nodule formation similar to that observed during prostaglandin E2 treatment. The prostaglandin E2/EP4 agonist also stimulated MMP-9 expression in bone marrow stromal cell cultures. The EP4 agonist further restored the reduction of MMP-9 expression in the COX-2-/- fracture callus. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that EP2 and EP4 have differential functions during endochondral bone repair. Activation of EP4, but not EP2 rescued impaired bone fracture healing in COX-2-/- mice.
      13. URL :
        http://ajp.amjpathol.org/cgi/content/abstract/175/2/772
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10401
      1. Author :
        Kadioglu, A.; Brewin, H.; Hartel, T.; Brittan, J. L.; Klein, M.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Jenkinson, H. F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Mol Oral Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen10, Xen 10, Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, IVIS, Animals; Bacterial Adhesion; Bacterial Processes; Bacterial Proteins/*physiology; *Carrier State; Colony Count, Microbial; Female; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Lung/microbiology; Meningitis, Pneumococcal/microbiology; Mice; Models, Animal; Mutation; Nasopharynx/*microbiology; Pneumonia, Pneumococcal/complications; Sepsis/*microbiology; Streptococcus pneumoniae/*pathogenicity; Virulence Factors/physiology
      12. Abstract :
        Summary The pneumococcal cell surface protein PavA is a virulence factor associated with adherence and invasion in vitro. In this study we show in vivo that PavA is necessary for Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 colonization of the murine upper respiratory tract in a long-term carriage model, with PavA-deficient pneumococci being quickly cleared from nasopharyngeal tissue. In a pneumonia model, pavA mutants were not cleared from the lungs of infected mice and persisted to cause chronic infection, whereas wild-type pneumococci caused systemic infection. Hence, under the experimental conditions, PavA-deficient pneumococci appeared to be unable to seed from lung tissue into blood, although they survived in blood when administered intravenously. In a meningitis model of infection, levels of PavA-deficient pneumococci in blood and brain following intercisternal injection were significantly lower than wild type. Taken collectively these results suggest that PavA is involved in successful colonization of mucosal surfaces and in translocation of pneumococci across host barriers. Pneumococcal sepsis is a major cause of mortality worldwide so identification of factors such as PavA that are necessary for carriage and for translocation from tissue to blood is of clinical and therapeutic importance.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20331793
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10400
      1. Author :
        Barman, T. K.; Rao, M.; Bhati, A.; Kishore, K.; Shukla, G.; Kumar, M.; Mathur, T.; Pandya, M.; Upadhyay, D. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Indian J Med Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        134
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen10, Xen 10, Streptococcus pnuemoniae Xen10, IVIS,
      12. Abstract :
        Background & objectives: In vivo imaging system has contributed significantly to the understanding of bacterial infection and efficacy of drugs in animal model. We report five rapid, reproducible, and non invasive murine pulmonary infection, skin and soft tissue infection, sepsis, and meningitis models using Xenogen bioluminescent strains and specialized in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Methods: The progression of bacterial infection in different target organs was evaluated by the photon intensity and target organ bacterial counts. Genetically engineered bioluminescent bacterial strains viz. Staphylococcus aureus Xen 8.1, 29 and 31; Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen 9 and 10 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen-5 were used to induce different target organs infection and were validated with commercially available antibiotics. Results: The lower limit of detection of colony forming unit (cfu) was 1.7-log10 whereas the lower limit of detection of relative light unit (RLU) was 4.2-log10 . Recovery of live bacteria from different target organs showed that the bioluminescent signal correlated to the live bacterial count. Interpretation & conclusions: This study demonstrated the real time monitoring and non-invasive analysis of progression of infection and pharmacological efficacy of drugs. These models may be useful for pre-clinical discovery of new antibiotics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22199109
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10399
      1. Author :
        Nowatzki, P. J.; Koepsel, R. R.; Stoodley, P.; Min, K.; Harper, A.; Murata, H.; Donfack, J.; Hortelano, E. R.; Ehrlich, G. D.; Russell, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Acta Biomater
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilm-associated infections are a major complication of implanted and indwelling medical devices like urological and venous catheters. They commonly persist even in the presence of an oral or intravenous antibiotic regimen, often resulting in chronic illness. We have developed a new approach to inhibiting biofilm growth on synthetic materials through controlled release of salicylic acid from a polymeric coating. Herein we report the synthesis and testing of a ultraviolet-cured polyurethane acrylate polymer composed, in part, of salicyl acrylate, which hydrolyzes upon exposure to aqueous conditions, releasing salicylic acid while leaving the polymer backbone intact. The salicylic acid release rate was tuned by adjusting the polymer composition. Anti-biofilm performance of the coatings was assessed under several biofilm forming conditions using a novel combination of the MBEC Assay biofilm multi-peg growth system and bioluminescence monitoring for live cell quantification. Films of the salicylic acid-releasing polymers were found to inhibit biofilm formation, as shown by bioluminescent and GFP reporter strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Urinary catheters coated on their inner lumens with the salicylic acid-releasing polymer significantly reduced biofilm formation by E. coli for up to 5 days under conditions that simulated physiological urine flow.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22342353
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10394
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