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      1. Author :
        Johnson, J. L.; Pillai, S.; Pernazza, D.; Sebti, S. M.; Lawrence, N. J.; Chellappan, S. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; E2F Transcription Factors/*genetics/metabolism; Enzyme Assays/methods; Female; Gelatin/metabolism; *Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Matrix Metalloproteinases/biosynthesis/*genetics/metabolism; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neoplasm Metastasis; Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein/*metabolism; Retinoblastoma Protein/genetics/*metabolism; Transcription, Genetic; Transfection
      12. Abstract :
        The retinoblastoma (Rb)-E2F transcriptional regulatory pathway plays a major role in cell-cycle regulation, but its role in invasion and metastasis is less well understood. We find that many genes involved in the invasion of cancer cells, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), have potential E2F-binding sites in their promoters. E2F-binding sites were predicted on all 23 human MMP gene promoters, many of which harbored multiple E2F-binding sites. Studies presented here show that MMP genes such as MMP9, MMP14, and MMP15 which are overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer, have multiple E2F-binding sites and are regulated by the Rb-E2F pathway. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed the association of E2F1 with the MMP9, MMP14, and MMP15 promoters, and transient transfection experiments showed that these promoters are E2F responsive. Correspondingly, depletion of E2F family members by RNA interference techniques reduced the expression of these genes with a corresponding reduction in collagen degradation activity. Furthermore, activating Rb by inhibiting the interaction of Raf-1 with Rb by using the Rb-Raf-1 disruptor RRD-251 was sufficient to inhibit MMP transcription. This led to reduced invasion and migration of cancer cells in vitro and metastatic foci development in a tail vein lung metastasis model in mice. These results suggest that E2F transcription factors may play a role in promoting metastasis through regulation of MMP genes and that targeting the Rb-Raf-1 interaction is a promising approach for the treatment of metastatic disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22086850
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10525
      1. Author :
        Hanai, J.; Doro, N.; Sasaki, A. T.; Kobayashi, S.; Cantley, L. C.; Seth, P.; Sukhatme, V. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Cell Physiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        227
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, ATP Citrate (pro-S)-Lyase/*antagonists & inhibitors/genetics; Animals; Apoptosis; Cell Cycle; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Combined Modality Therapy; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition; Female; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Humans; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/*therapeutic use; Lung Neoplasms/*drug therapy/enzymology/pathology/*therapy; MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects; Mice; Mutation; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor/genetics; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        ATP citrate lyase (ACL) catalyzes the conversion of cytosolic citrate to acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate. A definitive role for ACL in tumorigenesis has emerged from ACL RNAi and chemical inhibitor studies, showing that ACL inhibition limits tumor cell proliferation and survival and induces differentiation in vitro. In vivo, it reduces tumor growth leading to a cytostatic effect and induces differentiation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood and agents that could enhance the efficacy of ACL inhibition have not been identified. Our studies focus on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines, which show phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation secondary to a mutation in the K-Ras gene or the EGFR gene. Here we show that ACL knockdown promotes apoptosis and differentiation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, in contrast to most studies, which elucidate how activation/suppression of signaling pathways can modify metabolism, we show that inhibition of a metabolic pathway “reverse signals” and attenuates PI3K/AKT signaling. Additionally, we find that statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which act downstream of ACL in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, dramatically enhance the anti-tumor effects of ACL inhibition, even regressing established tumors. With statin treatment, both PI3K/AKT and the MAPK pathways are affected. Moreover, this combined treatment is able to reduce the growth of EGF receptor resistant tumor cell types. Given the essential role of lipid synthesis in numerous cancers, this work may impact therapy in a broad range of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21688263
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10523
      1. Author :
        Baoum, A.; Ovcharenko, D.; Berkland, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Pharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        427
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Calcium/chemistry; Cell Line; Cell-Penetrating Peptides/administration & dosage/*chemistry; Drug Carriers/administration & dosage/adverse effects/*chemistry; *Gene Silencing; Genetic Therapy/*methods; Humans; Luciferases; Nanoparticles/administration & dosage/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Tissue Distribution
      12. Abstract :
        The development of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) offers new strategies for manipulating specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. Myriad cationic polymer and lipid formulations have been explored, but an effective, non-toxic carrier remains a major barrier to clinical translation. Among the emerging candidates for siRNA carriers are cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can traverse the plasma membrane and facilitate the intracellular delivery of siRNA. Previously, a highly efficient and non-cytotoxic means of gene delivery was designed by complexing plasmid DNA with CPPs, then condensing with calcium. Here, the CPP TAT and a longer, 'double' TAT (dTAT) were investigated as potential carriers for siRNA. Various N/P ratios and calcium concentrations were used to optimize siRNA complexes in vitro. Upon addition of calcium, 'loose' siRNA/CPP complexes were condensed into small nanoparticles. Knockdown of luciferase expression in the human epithelial lung cell line A549-luc-C8 was high (up to 93%) with no evidence of cytotoxicity. Selected formulations of the dTAT complexes were dosed intravenously up to 1000 mg/kg with minimal toxicity. Biodistribution studies revealed high levels of gene knockdown in the lung and muscle tissue suggesting these simple vectors may offer a translatable approach to siRNA delivery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21856394
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10519
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E; Oei, Yoko; Hornig, Yvette S; Yu, Shang-Fan; Dusich, Joan; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Clinical & experimental metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8; Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Colonic Neoplasms; Fluorouracil; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Longitudinal Studies; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Lymphatic Metastasis; Male; Mice; Mice, SCID; Mitomycin; Models, Biological; Neoplasm Transplantation; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms
      12. Abstract :
        Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits sensitive in vivo detection and quantification of cells specifically engineered to emit visible light. Three stable human tumor cell lines engineered to express luciferase were assessed for their tumorigenicity in subcutaneous, intravenous and spontaneous metastasis models. Bioluminescent PC-3M-luc-C6 human prostate cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into SCID-beige mice and were monitored for tumor growth and response to 5-FU and mitomycin C treatments. Progressive tumor development and inhibition/regression following drug treatment were observed and quantified in vivo using BLI. Imaging data correlated to standard external caliper measurements of tumor volume, but bioluminescent data permitted earlier detection of tumor growth. In a lung colonization model, bioluminescent A549-luc-C8 human lung cancer cells were injected intravenously and lung metastases were monitored in vivo by whole animal imaging. Anesthetized mice were imaged weekly allowing a temporal assessment of in vivo lung tumor growth. This longitudinal study design permitted an accurate, real-time evaluation of tumor burden in the same animals over time. End-point bioluminescence measured in vivo correlated to total lung weight at necropsy. For a spontaneous metastatic tumor model, bioluminescent HT-29-luc-D6 human colon cancer cells implanted subcutaneously produced metastases to lung and lymph nodes in SCID-beige mice. Both primary tumors and micrometastases were detected by BLI in vivo. Ex vivo imaging of excised lung lobes and lymph nodes confirmed the in vivo signals and indicated a slightly higher frequency of metastasis in some mice. Levels of bioluminescence from in vivo and ex vivo images corresponded to the frequency and size of metastatic lesions in lungs and lymph nodes as subsequently confirmed by histology. In summary, BLI provided rapid, non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth and regression in animals. Its application to traditional oncology animal models offers quantitative and sensitive analysis of tumor growth and metastasis. The ability to temporally assess tumor development and responses to drug therapies in vivo also improves upon current standard animal models that are based on single end point data.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14713107
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8980
      1. Author :
        Goergen, C.J.; Azuma, J.; Barr, K.N.; Magdefessel, L.; Kallop, D.Y.; Gogineni, A.; Grewall, A.; Weimer, R.M.; Connolly, A.J.; Dalman, R.L.; Taylor, C.A.; Tsao, P.S.; Greve, J.M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aaa; abdominal aortic aneurysm; FX Pro Kodak molecular Imaging System; ImageJ software; in vivo imaging; jugular vein injection; mice; MMPSense 680; ProSense 750; tail vein injection; thoracic aorta; vascular
      12. Abstract :
        <AbstractText Label=“OBJECTIVE” NlmCategory=“OBJECTIVE”>To quantitatively compare aortic curvature and motion with resulting aneurysm location, direction of expansion, and pathophysiological features in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs).</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“METHODS AND RESULTS” NlmCategory=“RESULTS”>MRI was performed at 4.7 T with the following parameters: (1) 3D acquisition for vessel geometry and (2) 2D cardiac-gated acquisition to quantify luminal motion. Male 24-week-old mice were imaged before and after AAA formation induced by angiotensin II (AngII)-filled osmotic pump implantation or infusion of elastase. AngII-induced AAAs formed near the location of maximum abdominal aortic curvature, and the leftward direction of expansion was correlated with the direction of suprarenal aortic motion. Elastase-induced AAAs formed in a region of low vessel curvature and had no repeatable direction of expansion. AngII significantly increased mean blood pressure (22.7 mm Hg, P<0.05), whereas both models showed a significant 2-fold decrease in aortic cyclic strain (P<0.05). Differences in patterns of elastin degradation and localization of fluorescent signal from protease-activated probes were also observed.</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“CONCLUSIONS” NlmCategory=“CONCLUSIONS”>The direction of AngII aneurysm expansion correlated with the direction of motion, medial elastin dissection, and adventitial remodeling. Anterior infrarenal aortic motion correlated with medial elastin degradation in elastase-induced aneurysms. Results from both models suggest a relationship between aneurysm pathological features and aortic geometry and motion.</AbstractText>
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21071686
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8450
      15. Serial :
        4803
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        251
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abdominal Wall; Animals; Bioware; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Polypropylenes; Polytetrafluoroethylene; pXen-5; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Surgical Mesh; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE To study the influence of morphology of surgical meshes on the course of bacterial infection under the influence of the host immune system in an in vivo chronic bacterial infection model. BACKGROUND The use of prosthetic meshes has increased dramatically the last decades in abdominal wall reconstructive surgery. Whereas infection is becoming a more frequent complication, attention is increasingly drawn to the influence of the surgeon's mesh choice on the course of this complication. METHODS Samples of 6 often applied surgical meshes were contaminated with a bioluminescent strain of Staphylococcus aureus and implanted subcutaneously in an immunocompetent BALB/c mouse. The intensity and the spreading of bioluminescence (ie, p/s/cm/sr) were analyzed non-invasively in vivo during a 10-day follow-up period. RESULTS Over the course of infection, multifilament polypropylene and hydrophobic materials showed a significantly higher persistence of bacteria as well as spreading of infection compared to all other meshes. In contrast, infection resolved in almost all animals with a low-weight polyester mesh. CONCLUSION The results of this study are in accordance with circumstantial evidence from limited clinical reports on infection involving surgical meshes and suggest that multifilament and hydrophobic meshes significantly increase bacterial persistence or spreading in the infected area in contrast to monofilament polypropylene and lightweight meshes. Therefore, the surgeon should consider this outcome when choosing a mesh graft for limiting infection in abdominal wall repair.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19864938
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9017
      1. Author :
        Kuklin, Nelly A; Pancari, Gregory D; Tobery, Timothy W; Cope, Leslie; Jackson, Jesse; Gill, Charles; Overbye, Karen; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Montgomery, Donna; Anderson, Annaliesa S; McClements, William; Jansen, Kathrin U
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        47
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abscess; Acetamides; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Catheterization; Colony Count, Microbial; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Female; Foreign Bodies; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Muscle, Skeletal; Oxazolidinones; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Thigh; Time Factors; Wound Infection; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcal infections associated with catheter and prosthetic implants are difficult to eradicate and often lead to chronic infections. Development of novel antibacterial therapies requires simple, reliable, and relevant models for infection. Using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, we have adapted the existing foreign-body and deep-wound mouse models of staphylococcal infection to allow real-time monitoring of the bacterial colonization of catheters or tissues. This approach also enables kinetic measurements of bacterial growth and clearance in each infected animal. Persistence of infection was observed throughout the course of the study until termination of the experiment at day 16 in a deep-wound model and day 21 in the foreign-body model, providing sufficient time to test the effects of antibacterial compounds. The usefulness of both animal models was assessed by using linezolid as a test compound and comparing bioluminescent measurements to bacterial counts. In the foreign-body model, a three-dose antibiotic regimen (2, 5, and 24 h after infection) resulted in a decrease in both luminescence and bacterial counts recovered from the implant compared to those of the mock-treated infected mice. In addition, linezolid treatment prevented the formation of subcutaneous abscesses, although it did not completely resolve the infection. In the thigh model, the same treatment regimen resulted in complete resolution of the luminescent signal, which correlated with clearance of the bacteria from the thighs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12936968
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9992
      1. Author :
        Mortin, Lawrence I; Li, Tongchuan; Van Praagh, Andrew D G; Zhang, Shuxin; Zhang, Xi-Xian; Alder, Jeff D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        51
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetamides; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Daptomycin; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Methicillin Resistance; Mice; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Neutropenia; Oxazolidinones; Peritonitis; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The rising rates of antibiotic resistance accentuate the critical need for new antibiotics. Daptomycin is a new antibiotic with a unique mode of action and a rapid in vitro bactericidal effect against gram-positive organisms. This study examined the kinetics of daptomycin's bactericidal action against peritonitis caused by methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in healthy and neutropenic mice and compared this activity with those of other commonly used antibiotics. CD-1 mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with lethal doses of MSSA (Xen-29) or MRSA (Xen-1), laboratory strains transformed with a plasmid containing the lux operon, which confers bioluminescence. One hour later, the animals were given a single dose of daptomycin at 50 mg/kg of body weight subcutaneously (s.c.), nafcillin at 100 mg/kg s.c., vancomycin at 100 mg/kg s.c., linezolid at 100 mg/kg via gavage (orally), or saline (10 ml/kg s.c.). The mice were anesthetized hourly, and photon emissions from living bioluminescent bacteria were imaged and quantified. The luminescence in saline-treated control mice either increased (neutropenic mice) or remained relatively unchanged (healthy mice). In contrast, by 2 to 3 h postdosing, daptomycin effected a 90% reduction of luminescence of MSSA or MRSA in both healthy and neutropenic mice. The activity of daptomycin against both MSSA and MRSA strains was superior to those of nafcillin, vancomycin, and linezolid. Against MSSA peritonitis, daptomycin showed greater and more rapid bactericidal activity than nafcillin or linezolid. Against MRSA peritonitis, daptomycin showed greater and more rapid bactericidal activity than vancomycin or linezolid. The rapid decrease in the luminescent signal in the daptomycin-treated neutropenic mice underscores the potency of this antibiotic against S. aureus in the immune-suppressed host.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17307984
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9050
      1. Author :
        Burkatovskaya, Marina; Tegos, George P; Swietlik, Emilia; Demidova, Tatiana N; P Castano, Ana; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetates; Alginates; Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bandages; Bioware; Chitosan; Glucuronic Acid; Hexuronic Acids; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Occlusive Dressings; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Silver Sulfadiazine; Staphylococcus aureus; Wound Healing; Wound Infection; Xen8.1, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        HemCon bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation used as a hemostatic control dressing, and its chemical structure suggests that it should also be antimicrobial. We tested its ability to rapidly kill bacteria in vitro and in mouse models of infected wounds. We used the Gram-negative species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis and the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus that had all been stably transduced with the entire bacterial lux operon to allow in vivo bioluminescence imaging. An excisional wound in Balb/c mice was inoculated with 50-250 million cells followed after 30 min by application of HemCon bandage, alginate sponge bandage, silver sulfadiazine cream or no treatment. HemCon was more adhesive to the wound and conformed well to the injury compared to alginate. Animal survival was followed over 15 days with observations of bioluminescence emission and animal activity daily. Chitosan acetate treated mice infected with P. aeruginosa and P. mirabilis all survived while those receiving no treatment, alginate and silver sulfadiazine demonstrated 25-100% mortality. Chitosan acetate was much more effective than other treatments in rapidly reducing bioluminescence in the wound consistent with its rapid bactericidal activity in vitro as well as its light-scattering properties. S. aureus formed only non-lethal localized infections after temporary immunosuppression of the mice but HemCon was again more effective in reducing bioluminescence. The data suggest that chitosan acetate rapidly kills bacteria in the wound before systemic invasion can take place, and is superior to alginate bandage and silver sulfadiazine that may both encourage bacterial growth in the short term.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16616364
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9987