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      1. Author :
        Pesnel, S.; Pillon, A.; Creancier, L.; Lerondel, S.; Le Pape, A.; Recher, C.; Demur, C.; Guilbaud, N.; Kruczynski, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        e30690
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, HCT116-luc2, IVIS, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage/*immunology; Antigens, CD45/metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/pathology; Disease Models, Animal; Flow Cytometry; Fluorescent Dyes/*metabolism; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods; Injections, Intravenous; Leukemia/*diagnosis/*pathology; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/pathology; Longevity; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, SCID; Reproducibility of Results; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: The assessment of anticancer agents to treat leukemia needs to have animal models closer to the human pathology such as implantation in immunodeficient mice of leukemic cells from patient samples. A sensitive and early detection of tumor cells in these orthotopic models is a prerequisite for monitoring engraftment of leukemic cells and their dissemination in mice. Therefore, we developed a fluorescent antibody based strategy to detect leukemic foci in mice bearing patient-derived leukemic cells using fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) to determine when to start treatments with novel antitumor agents. METHODS: Two mAbs against the CD44 human myeloid marker or the CD45 human leukocyte marker were labeled with Alexa Fluor 750 and administered to leukemia-bearing mice after having verified the immunoreactivity in vitro. Bioluminescent leukemic cells (HL60-Luc) were used to compare the colocalization of the fluorescent mAb with these cells. The impact of the labeled antibodies on disease progression was further determined. Finally, the fluorescent hCD45 mAb was tested in mice engrafted with human leukemic cells. RESULTS: The probe labeling did not modify the immunoreactivity of the mAbs. There was a satisfactory correlation between bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and FRI and low doses of mAb were sufficient to detect leukemic foci. However, anti-hCD44 mAb had a strong impact on the tumor proliferation contrary to anti-hCD45 mAb. The use of anti-hCD45 mAb allowed the detection of leukemic patient cells engrafted onto NOD/SCID mice. CONCLUSIONS: A mAb labeled with a near infrared fluorochrome is useful to detect leukemic foci in disseminated models provided that its potential impact on tumor proliferation has been thoroughly documented.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22303450
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10503
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10498
      1. Author :
        Cronin, M.; Akin, A. R.; Collins, S. A.; Meganck, J.; Kim, J. B.; Baban, C. K.; Joyce, S. A.; van Dam, G. M.; Zhang, N.; van Sinderen, D.; O'Sullivan, G. C.; Kasahara, N.; Gahan, C. G.; Francis, K. P.; Tangney, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Administration, Oral; Animals; Bacteria/*genetics; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Genes, Reporter/genetics; Genetic Engineering; Glioblastoma/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Luminescent Measurements/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Mice; Molecular Imaging/*methods; X-Ray Microtomography
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to track microbes in real time in vivo is of enormous value for preclinical investigations in infectious disease or gene therapy research. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumours following systemic administration. Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI) represents a powerful tool for use with bacteria engineered to express reporter genes such as lux. BLI is traditionally used as a 2D modality resulting in images that are limited in their ability to anatomically locate cell populations. Use of 3D diffuse optical tomography can localize the signals but still need to be combined with an anatomical imaging modality like micro-Computed Tomography (muCT) for interpretation.In this study, the non-pathogenic commensal bacteria E. coli K-12 MG1655 and Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003, or Salmonella Typhimurium SL7207 each expressing the luxABCDE operon were intravenously (i.v.) administered to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c) FLuc-expressing xenograft tumours. Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post i.v.-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. Through whole body imaging for both lux and FLuc, bacteria and tumour cells were co-localised. 3D BLI and muCT image analysis revealed a pattern of multiple clusters of bacteria within tumours. Investigation of spatial resolution of 3D optical imaging was supported by ex vivo histological analyses. In vivo imaging of orally-administered commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was also achieved using 3D BLI. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential to simultaneously image multiple BLI reporter genes three dimensionally in vivo using approaches that provide unique information on spatial locations.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22295120
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10496
      1. Author :
        Guo, K.; Tang, J. P.; Jie, L.; Al-Aidaroos, A. Q.; Hong, C. W.; Tan, C. P.; Park, J. E.; Varghese, L.; Feng, Z.; Zhou, J.; Chng, W. J.; Zeng, Q.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncotarget
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*immunology; Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/drug therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy; Humans; Immediate-Early Proteins/*immunology; Killer Cells, Natural/*immunology; Lymphocyte Activation/immunology; Melanoma/drug therapy; Mice; Mice, Nude; Mice, SCID; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods; Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/*immunology; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology/pharmacology/therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        Antibodies are considered as 'magic bullets' because of their high specificity. It is believed that antibodies are too large to routinely enter the cytosol, thus antibody therapeutic approach has been limited to extracellular or secreted proteins expressed by cancer cells. However, many oncogenic proteins are localized within the cell. To explore the possibility of antibody therapies against intracellular targets, we generated a chimeric antibody targeting the intracellular PRL-3 oncoprotein to assess its antitumor activities in mice. Remarkably, we observed that the PRL-3 chimeric antibody could efficiently and specifically reduce the formation of PRL-3 expressing metastatic tumors. We further found that natural killer (NK) cells were important in mediating the therapeutic effect, which was only observed in a nude mouse model (T-cell deficient), but not in a Severe Combined Immunodeficiency' (scid ) mouse model (B- and T-cell deficient), indicating the anticancer effect also depends on host B-cell activity. Our study involving 377 nude and scid mice suggest that antibodies targeting intracellular proteins can be developed to treat cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22374986
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10497
      1. Author :
        Hidemi Hattori, Kaori Higuchi, Yashiro Nogami, Yoshiko Amano, Masayuki Ishihara and Bonpei Takase
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Extract:

        With the advent of tissue regeneration and gene therapy for heart disease, evaluation of coronary circulation and cardiac function in vivo, especially in a disease model, is extremely important. Conventional methods such as microcomputed tomography, high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography, and high-resolution ultrasound have become invaluable tools in cardiovascular research. However, the disadvantages and limitations of these approaches sometimes preclude researchers from conducting important and specific studies on coronary circulation and cardiac function. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel real-time, in vivo fluorescent optical imaging system for use in the mouse cardiovascular system. We report the use of this system for repeatedly assessing coronary circulation, cardiovascular structure, and cardiac function in live mice...
      13. URL :
        http://circimaging.ahajournals.org/content/2/3/277.extract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4648
      1. Author :
        Wunder A and Klohs J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Basic Research in Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        103
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; atherosclerosis; bioluminescence imaging; fluorescence imaging; myocardial infarction; stroke; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Pathophysiological processes in the vascular system are the major cause of mortality and disease. Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory process in arterial walls, can lead to formation of plaques, whose rupture can lead to thrombus formation, obstruction of vessels (thrombosis), reduction of the blood flow (ischemia), cell death in the tissue fed by the occluded vessel, and depending on the affected vessel, to myocardial infarction or stroke. Imaging techniques enabling visualization of the biological processes involved in this scenario are therefore highly desirable. In recent years, a number of reporter agents and reporter systems have been developed to visualize these processes using different imaging modalities including nuclear imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. This article comprises a brief overview of optical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and bioluminescence imaging for the visualization of vascular pathophysiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18324374
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4649
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