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      1. Author :
        Fogal, Valentina; Richardson, Adam D; Karmali, Priya P; Scheffler, Immo E; Smith, Jeffrey W; Ruoslahti, Erkki
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular and cellular biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        30
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carbon; Carrier Proteins; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Electron Transport Complex I; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Humans; Mass Spectrometry; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mitochondria; Mitochondrial Proteins; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Oxidative Phosphorylation; Protein Biosynthesis; Protein Stability; Rotenone
      12. Abstract :
        p32/gC1qR/C1QBP/HABP1 is a mitochondrial/cell surface protein overexpressed in certain cancer cells. Here we show that knocking down p32 expression in human cancer cells strongly shifts their metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to glycolysis. The p32 knockdown cells exhibited reduced synthesis of the mitochondrial-DNA-encoded OXPHOS polypeptides and were less tumorigenic in vivo. Expression of exogenous p32 in the knockdown cells restored the wild-type cellular phenotype and tumorigenicity. Increased glucose consumption and lactate production, known as the Warburg effect, are almost universal hallmarks of solid tumors and are thought to favor tumor growth. However, here we show that a protein regularly overexpressed in some cancers is capable of promoting OXPHOS. Our results indicate that high levels of glycolysis, in the absence of adequate OXPHOS, may not be as beneficial for tumor growth as generally thought and suggest that tumor cells use p32 to regulate the balance between OXPHOS and glycolysis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20100866
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8952
      1. Author :
        Peter, Christoph; Kielstein, Jan T; Clarke-Katzenberg, Regina; Adams, M Christopher; Pitsiouni, Maria; Kambham, Neeraja; Karimi, Mobin A; Kengatharan, Ken M; Cooke, John P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of urology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        177
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; carcinoma, renal cell; Cell Culture Techniques; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Firefly Luciferin; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Kidney Neoplasms; Luminescence; Luminescent Agents; Male; Mice; Mice, SCID; Models, Biological; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE Bioluminescent imaging permits sensitive in vivo detection and quantification of cells engineered to emit light. We developed a bioluminescent human renal cancer cell line for in vitro and in vivo studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS The 2 human renal cell carcinoma cell lines SN12-C and SN12-L1 were stably transfected to constitutively express luciferase using a retroviral shuttle. The bioluminescent signal was correlated with tumor cell numbers in vitro. Parental and transfected cells were compared by growth kinetics and histology. Tumor burden after heterotopic injection in immune deficient mice was monitored up to 39 days. The kinetics of the bioluminescent signal was evaluated for 1 to 60 minutes following luciferin injection. RESULTS Bioengineered renal cancer cell lines stably expressed luciferase. The growth kinetics of the cells in vitro and the histology of tumors resulting from implantation of these cells were unaffected by retroviral transfection with the luciferase gene. As few as 1,000 cells could be reliably detected. The intensity of the bioluminescent signal correlated with the number of tumor cells in vitro. Photon emission in vivo and ex vivo correlated significantly with tumor weight at sacrifice. After intraperitoneal injection of luciferin there was a time dependent change in the intensity of the bioluminescent signal with maximum photon emission at 20 minutes (optimal 17 to 25). CONCLUSIONS Luciferase transfected human renal cancer lines allow reliable, rapid, noninvasive and longitudinal monitoring of tumor growth in vivo. The ability to assess tumor development in vivo with time is economical and effective compared to end point data experiments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17509355
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9009
      1. Author :
        Razavi, Reza; Harrison, Lawrence E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgical oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carcinoma; Cell Proliferation; Colonic Neoplasms; DNA Damage; Drug Therapy, Combination; Female; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Hyperthermia, Induced; Injections, Intraperitoneal; Mice; Mice, Nude; Oxidants; Oxidative Stress; Survival Rate; tert-Butylhydroperoxide; Treatment Outcome; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to extend our in vitro observations that induced oxidative stress under hyperthermic conditions decreases tumor cell growth into a preclinical murine model of hyperthermic perfusion. METHODS A nude mouse model of colon cancer carcinomatosis with HT-29-Luc-D6 colon cancer cells was established, and tumor growth was measured by serial bioluminescent imaging. RESULTS By means of a survival model of hyperthermic perfusion, we demonstrated that perfusion with normothermic saline decreased tumor growth compared with no perfusion controls, and tumor growth was further decreased with hyperthermic perfusion alone. The induction of oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide in the perfusate at concentrations as high as 600 microM was well tolerated in this model of hyperthermic perfusion. Importantly, induced oxidative stress using hydrogen peroxide under hyperthermic conditions significantly decreased in vivo tumor cell growth compared with all other controls. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of our observations, thermal sensitization through modulation of cellular oxidative stress may represent a novel approach to increase the efficacy of hyperthermia as an anticancer modality.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19711132
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9008
      1. Author :
        Casarez, Eli V; Dunlap-Brown, Marya E; Conaway, Mark R; Amorino, George P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carcinoma; Estradiol; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3; PC-3M-luc; Phosphorylation; Prostatic Neoplasms; Radiation-Sensitizing Agents; Subcutaneous Tissue; Transplantation, Heterotopic; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2) is an endogenous estradiol metabolite that inhibits microtubule polymerization, tumor growth, and angiogenesis. Because prostate cancer is often treated with radiotherapy, and 2ME2 has shown efficacy as a single agent against human prostate carcinoma, we evaluated 2ME2 as a potential radiosensitizer in prostate cancer models. A dose-dependent decrease in mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was observed in human PC3 prostate cancer cells treated with 2ME2 for 18 h. This decrease correlated with in vitro radiosensitization measured by clonogenic assays, and these effects were blocked by the expression of constitutively active MEK. Male nude mice with subcutaneous PC3 xenografts in the hind leg were treated with 2ME2 (75 mg/kg) p.o. for 5 days, and 2 Gy radiation fractions were delivered each day at 4 h after drug treatment. A statistically significant super-additive effect between radiation and 2ME2 was observed in this subcutaneous model, using analysis of within-animal slopes. A PC-3M orthotopic model was also used, with bioluminescence imaging as an end point. PC-3M cells stably expressing the luciferase gene were surgically implanted into the prostates of male nude mice. Mice were given oral doses of 2ME2 (75 mg/kg), with radiation fractions (3 Gy) delivered 4 h later. Mice were then imaged weekly for 4 to 5 weeks with a Xenogen system. A significant super-additive effect was also observed in the orthotopic model. These data show that 2ME2 is an effective radiosensitizing agent against human prostate cancer xenografts, and that the mechanism may involve a decrease in mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation by 2ME2.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17804747
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8972
      1. Author :
        Blagbrough, Ian S; Zara, Chiara
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Pharmaceutical research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        26
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cats; Cattle; Disease Models, Animal; Dna; Dogs; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Fishes; Gene Therapy; Horses; Humans; Mice; PC-3M-luc; Pregnancy; Primates; Rats; RNA, Small Interfering; Sheep; Swine
      12. Abstract :
        Nanoparticles, including lipopolyamines leading to lipoplexes, liposomes, and polyplexes are targeted drug carrier systems in the current search for a successful delivery system for polynucleic acids. This review is focused on the impact of gene and siRNA delivery for studies of efficacy, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics within the setting of the wide variety of in vivo animal models now used. This critical appraisal of the recent literature sets out the different models that are currently being investigated to bridge from studies in cell lines through towards clinical reality. Whilst many scientists will be familiar with rodent (murine, fecine, cricetine, and musteline) models, few probably think of fish as a clinically relevant animal model, but zebrafish, madake, and rainbow trout are all being used. Larger animal models include rabbit, cat, dog, and cow. Pig is used both for the prevention of foot-and-mouth disease and human diseases, sheep is a model for corneal transplantation, and the horse naturally develops arthritis. Non-human primate models (macaque, common marmoset, owl monkey) are used for preclinical gene vector safety and efficacy trials to bridge the gap prior to clinical studies. We aim for the safe development of clinically effective delivery systems for DNA and RNAi technologies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18841450
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8965
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        175
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cattle; Cells, Cultured; Cystic Fibrosis; Flavoproteins; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Immunity, Innate; Immunity, Mucosal; Lactoperoxidase; Lung Diseases; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Rats; Reactive Oxygen Species; Respiratory Mucosa; RNA, Small Interfering; Staphylococcus aureus; Thiocyanates; Trachea; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        RATIONALE The respiratory tract is constantly exposed to airborne microorganisms. Nevertheless, normal airways remain sterile without recruiting phagocytes. This innate immune activity has been attributed to mucociliary clearance and antimicrobial polypeptides of airway surface liquid. Defective airway immunity characterizes cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a chloride channel. The pathophysiology of defective immunity in CF remains to be elucidated. OBJECTIVE We investigated the ability of non-CF and CF airway epithelia to kill bacteria through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). METHODS ROS production and ROS-mediated bactericidal activity were determined on the apical surfaces of human and rat airway epithelia and on cow tracheal explants. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Dual oxidase enzyme of airway epithelial cells generated sufficient H(2)O(2) to support production of bactericidal hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the presence of airway surface liquid components lactoperoxidase and thiocyanate (SCN(-)). This OSCN(-) formation eliminated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway mucosal surfaces, whereas it was nontoxic to the host. In contrast to normal epithelia, CF epithelia failed to secrete SCN(-), thereby rendering the oxidative antimicrobial system inactive. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate a novel innate defense mechanism of airways that kills bacteria via ROS and suggest a new cellular and molecular basis for defective airway immunity in CF.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17082494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9988
      1. Author :
        Priddle, Helen; Grabowska, Anna; Morris, Teresa; Clarke, Philip A; McKenzie, Andrew J; Sottile, Virginie; Denning, Chris; Young, Lorraine; Watson, Sue
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cloning and stem cells
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        11
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Differentiation; Chick Embryo; Embryonic Stem Cells; Fluorescent Dyes; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, SCID; PC-3M-luc; Software; Stem Cell Transplantation; Teratoma
      12. Abstract :
        Research into the behavior, efficacy, and biosafety of stem cells with a view to clinical transplantation requires the development of noninvasive methods for in vivo imaging of cells transplanted into animal models. This is particularly relevant for human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), because transplantation of undifferentiated hESCs leads to tumor formation. The present study aimed to monitor hESCs in real time when injected in vivo. hESCs were stably transfected to express luciferase, and luciferase expression was clearly detected in the undifferentiated and differentiated state. When transfected hESCs were injected into chick embryos, bioluminescence could be detected both ex and in ovo. In the SCID mouse model, undifferentiated hESCs were detectable after injection either into the muscle layer of the peritoneum or the kidney capsule. Tumors became detectable between days 10-30, with approximately a 3 log increase in the luminescence signal by day 75. The growth phase occurred earlier in the kidney capsule and then reached a plateau, whilst tumors in the peritoneal wall grew steadily throughout the period analysed. These results show the widespread utility of bioluminescent for in vivo imaging of hESCs in a variety of model systems for preclinical research into regenerative medicine and cancer biology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19522673
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8961
      1. Author :
        Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R, Jr; Bottaro, Donald P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        13
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; GRB2 Adaptor Protein; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; PC-3M-luc; Protein Binding; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Tetrazolium Salts; Thiazoles
      12. Abstract :
        Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17616655
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8969
      1. Author :
        Zhang, H; Fagan, D H; Zeng, X; Freeman, K T; Sachdev, D; Yee, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Oncogene
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Female; Humans; Insulin; Lung Neoplasms; Lymphangiogenesis; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms, Experimental; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Phosphorylation; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; Receptor, Insulin; RNA, Small Interfering; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
      12. Abstract :
        Insulin receptor (IR) and the type I IGF receptor (IGF1R) are structurally and functionally related. The function of IGF1R in cancer has been well documented and anti-IGF1R strategies to treat cancer have shown initial positive results. However, the role of IR in tumor biology, independent of IGF1R, is less clear. To address this issue, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to specifically downregulate IR in two cancer cell lines, LCC6 and T47D. Cells with reduced IR showed reduced insulin-stimulated Akt activation, without affecting IGF1R activation. Cells with reduced IR formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent conditions. LCC6 IR shRNA xenograft tumors in mice had reduced growth, angiogenesis and lymphangiogensis when compared with LCC6 wild-type cells. Accordingly, LCC6 IR shRNA clones produced less hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and VEGF-D. Furthermore, LCC6 IR shRNA cells formed fewer pulmonary metastases when compared with LCC6 wild-type cells. Using in vivo luciferase imaging, we have shown that LCC6 IR shRNA cells have less seeding and colonization potential in the lung and liver of mice than LCC6 cells. In conclusion, downregulation of IR inhibited cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and metastasis. Our data argue that IR should also be targeted in cancer therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20154728
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8986
      1. Author :
        Neal, Robert E, 2nd; Singh, Ravi; Hatcher, Heather C; Kock, Nancy D; Torti, Suzy V; Davalos, Rafael V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research and treatment
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        123
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Electrochemotherapy; Electrodes; Female; Humans; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Needles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a therapeutic technology for the ablation of soft tissues using electrodes to deliver intense but short electric pulses across a cell membrane, creating nanopores that lead to cell death. This phenomenon only affects the cell membrane, leaving the extracellular matrix and sensitive structures intact, making it a promising technique for the treatment many types of tumors. In this paper, we present the first in vivo study to achieve tumor regression using a translatable, clinically relevant single needle electrode for treatment administration. Numerical models of the electric field distribution for the protocol used suggest that a 1000 V/cm field threshold is sufficient to treat a tumor, and that the electric field distribution will slightly decrease if the same protocol were used on a tumor deep seated within a human breast. Tumor regression was observed in 5 out of 7 MDA-MB231 human mammary tumors orthotopically implanted in female Nu/Nu mice, with continued growth in controls.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20191380
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8988
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