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      1. Author :
        Hickson, Jonathan
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Urologic oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Biological Markers; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Molecular Probes; Optical Devices; Optical Phenomena; PC-3M-luc; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        There has recently been an explosion in the availability of new technologies to noninvasively detect biological processes in preclinical models. One such modality, optical imaging, comprises using bioluminescent and fluorescent reporters and probes to repetitively interrogate molecular events and monitor disease progression in animal models. This review includes an overview of optical imaging technologies (e.g., hardware, reporters, probes) available for small animal imaging and their application in monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy, and molecular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Also discussed are some of the challenges associated with in vivo optical imaging and the necessary controls and biological correlates one must include in experimental design and interpretation for successful preclinical studies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19414115
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8964
      1. Author :
        Hardy, Jonathan; Chu, Pauline; Contag, Christopher H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Disease models & mechanisms
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        1-2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Marrow; Bone Marrow Cells; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Humans; Knee Joint; Listeria monocytogenes; Listeriosis; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mutation; pXen-5; Tibia
      12. Abstract :
        Murine listeriosis is one of the most comprehensive and well-studied models of infection, and Listeria monocytogenes has provided seminal information regarding bacterial pathogenesis. However, many aspects of the mouse model remain poorly understood, including carrier states and chronic colonization which represent important features of the spectrum of host-pathogen interaction. Bone marrow has recently been shown to harbor L. monocytogenes, which spreads from this location to the central nervous system. Bone could, therefore, be an important chronic reservoir, but this infection is difficult to study because it involves only a few bacteria and the extent of infection cannot be assessed until after the animal is sacrificed. We employed in vivo bioluminescence imaging to localize L. monocytogenes bone infections over time in live mice, revealing that the bacteria grow in discrete foci. These lesions can persist in many locations in the legs of mice and are not accompanied by a histological indication such as granuloma or a neutrophil infiltratate. We demonstrate that highly attenuated hly mutants, which have defective intracellular replication, are capable of prolonged focal infection of the bone marrow for periods of up to several weeks. These results support the recently proposed hypothesis that the bone marrow is a unique niche for L. monocytogenes.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19132117
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9018
      1. Author :
        Takeshita, Fumitaka; Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Nagahara, Shunji; Honma, Kimi; Sasaki, Hideo; Hirai, Kotaro; Teratani, Takumi; Namatame, Nachi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hanai, Koji; Kato, Takashi; Sano, Akihiko; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        102
      8. Issue :
        34
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Collagen; DNA-Binding Proteins; Drug Carriers; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Gene Therapy; Humans; Luciferases; Male; Mice; PC-3M-luc; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Prostatic Neoplasms; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; RNA, Small Interfering; Transcription Factors
      12. Abstract :
        Silencing of gene expression by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is rapidly becoming a powerful tool for genetic analysis and represents a potential strategy for therapeutic product development. However, there are no reports of systemic delivery for siRNAs toward treatment of bone-metastatic cancer. Accordingly, we report here that i.v. injection of GL3 luciferase siRNA complexed with atelocollagen showed effective reduction of luciferase expression from bone-metastatic prostate tumor cells developed in mouse thorax, jaws, and/or legs. We also show that the siRNA/atelocollagen complex can be efficiently delivered to tumors 24 h after injection and can exist intact at least for 3 days. Furthermore, atelocollagen-mediated systemic administration of siRNAs such as enhancer of zeste homolog 2 and phosphoinositide 3'-hydroxykinase p110-alpha-subunit, which were selected as candidate targets for inhibition of bone metastasis, resulted in an efficient inhibition of metastatic tumor growth in bone tissues. In addition, upregulation of serum IL-12 and IFN-alpha levels was not associated with the in vivo administration of the siRNA/atelocollagen complex. Thus, for treatment of bone metastasis of prostate cancer, an atelocollagen-mediated systemic delivery method could be a reliable and safe approach to the achievement of maximal function of siRNA.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16091473
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8979
      1. Author :
        Hanai, Koji; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Honma, Kimi; Nagahara, Shunji; Maeda, Miho; Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Sano, Akihiko; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1082
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Neoplasms; Collagen; Dermatitis; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Carriers; Gene Therapy; Humans; Hypersensitivity; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanoparticles; Neoplasm Metastasis; Oligonucleotides; PC-3M-luc; RNA, Small Interfering; Tissue Distribution
      12. Abstract :
        The goal of our research is to provide a practical platform for drug delivery in oligonucleotide therapy. We report here the efficacy of an atelocollagen-mediated oligonucleotide delivery system applied to systemic siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide treatments in animal disease models. Atelocollagen and oligonucleotides formed a complex of nanosized particles, which was highly stable against nucleases. The complex allowed oligonucleotides to be delivered efficiently into several organs and tissues via intravenous administration. In a tumor metastasis model, the complex successfully delivered siRNA to metastasized tumors in bone tissue and inhibited their growth. We also demonstrated that a single intravenous treatment of the antisense oligodeoxynucleotide complex suppressed ear dermatitis in a contact hypersensitivity model. These results indicate the strong potential of the atelocollagen-mediated drug delivery system for practical therapeutic technology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17145919
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8976
      1. Author :
        Shan, Liang; Wang, Songping; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Wang, Paul C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Molecular imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Fluorescence; Fluorescent Dyes; Humans; Liposomes; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Magnetics; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Microscopy, Confocal; Molecular Probes; Optics and Photonics; Transferrin; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        A dual probe with fluorescent and magnetic reporter groups was constructed by linkage of the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent transferrin conjugate (Tf(NIR)) on the surface of contrast agent-encapsulated cationic liposome (Lip-CA). This probe was used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging of MDA-MB-231-luc breast cancer cells grown as a monolayer in vitro and as solid tumor xenografts in nude mice. Confocal microscopy, optical imaging, and MRI showed a dramatic increase of in vitro cellular uptake of the fluorescent and magnetic reporter groups from the probe compared with the uptake of contrast agent or Lip-CA alone. Pretreatment with transferrin (Tf) blocked uptake of the probe reporters, indicating the importance and specificity of the Tf moiety for targeting. Intravenous administration of the dual probe to nude mice significantly enhanced the tumor contrast in MRI, and preferential accumulation of the fluorescent signal was clearly seen in NIR-based optical images. More interestingly, the contrast enhancement in MRI showed a heterogeneous pattern within tumors, which reflected the tumor's morphologic heterogeneity. These results indicate that the newly developed dual probe enhances the tumor image contrast and is superior to contrast agent alone for identifying the tumor pathologic features on the basis of MRI but also is suitable for NIR-based optical imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17445503
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8992
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E; Hornig, Yvette S; Oei, Yoko; Dusich, Joan; Purchio, Tony
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research: BCR
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Luciferases; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Plasmids; Transplantation, Heterologous; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION Our goal was to generate xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer based on luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 tumor cells that would provide rapid mammary tumor growth; produce metastasis to clinically relevant tissues such as lymph nodes, lung, and bone; and permit sensitive in vivo detection of both primary and secondary tumor sites by bioluminescent imaging. METHOD Two clonal cell sublines of human MDA-MB-231 cells that stably expressed firefly luciferase were isolated following transfection of the parental cells with luciferase cDNA. Each subline was passaged once or twice in vivo to enhance primary tumor growth and to increase metastasis. The resulting luciferase-expressing D3H1 and D3H2LN cells were analyzed for long-term bioluminescent stability, primary tumor growth, and distal metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bone and soft tissues by bioluminescent imaging. Cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of nude and nude-beige mice or were delivered systemically via intracardiac injection. Metastasis was also evaluated by ex vivo imaging and histologic analysis postmortem. RESULTS The D3H1 and D3H2LN cell lines exhibited long-term stable luciferase expression for up to 4-6 months of accumulative tumor growth time in vivo. Bioluminescent imaging quantified primary mammary fat pad tumor development and detected early spontaneous lymph node metastasis in vivo. Increased frequency of spontaneous lymph node metastasis was observed with D3H2LN tumors as compared with D3H1 tumors. With postmortem ex vivo imaging, we detected additional lung micrometastasis in mice with D3H2LN mammary tumors. Subsequent histologic evaluation of tissue sections from lymph nodes and lung lobes confirmed spontaneous tumor metastasis at these sites. Following intracardiac injection of the MDA-MB-231-luc tumor cells, early metastasis to skeletal tissues, lymph nodes, brain and various visceral organs was detected. Weekly in vivo imaging data permitted longitudinal analysis of metastasis at multiple sites simultaneously. Ex vivo imaging data from sampled tissues verified both skeletal and multiple soft tissue tumor metastasis. CONCLUSION This study characterized two new bioluminescent MDA-MB-231-luc human breast carcinoma cell lines with enhanced tumor growth and widespread metastasis in mice. Their application to current xenograft models of breast cancer offers rapid and highly sensitive detection options for preclinical assessment of anticancer therapies in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15987449
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8993
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E; Hornig, Yvette S; Oei, Yoko; Dusich, Joan; Purchio, Tony
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research: BCR
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Luciferases; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Plasmids; Transplantation, Heterologous; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION Our goal was to generate xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer based on luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 tumor cells that would provide rapid mammary tumor growth; produce metastasis to clinically relevant tissues such as lymph nodes, lung, and bone; and permit sensitive in vivo detection of both primary and secondary tumor sites by bioluminescent imaging. METHOD Two clonal cell sublines of human MDA-MB-231 cells that stably expressed firefly luciferase were isolated following transfection of the parental cells with luciferase cDNA. Each subline was passaged once or twice in vivo to enhance primary tumor growth and to increase metastasis. The resulting luciferase-expressing D3H1 and D3H2LN cells were analyzed for long-term bioluminescent stability, primary tumor growth, and distal metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bone and soft tissues by bioluminescent imaging. Cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of nude and nude-beige mice or were delivered systemically via intracardiac injection. Metastasis was also evaluated by ex vivo imaging and histologic analysis postmortem. RESULTS The D3H1 and D3H2LN cell lines exhibited long-term stable luciferase expression for up to 4-6 months of accumulative tumor growth time in vivo. Bioluminescent imaging quantified primary mammary fat pad tumor development and detected early spontaneous lymph node metastasis in vivo. Increased frequency of spontaneous lymph node metastasis was observed with D3H2LN tumors as compared with D3H1 tumors. With postmortem ex vivo imaging, we detected additional lung micrometastasis in mice with D3H2LN mammary tumors. Subsequent histologic evaluation of tissue sections from lymph nodes and lung lobes confirmed spontaneous tumor metastasis at these sites. Following intracardiac injection of the MDA-MB-231-luc tumor cells, early metastasis to skeletal tissues, lymph nodes, brain and various visceral organs was detected. Weekly in vivo imaging data permitted longitudinal analysis of metastasis at multiple sites simultaneously. Ex vivo imaging data from sampled tissues verified both skeletal and multiple soft tissue tumor metastasis. CONCLUSION This study characterized two new bioluminescent MDA-MB-231-luc human breast carcinoma cell lines with enhanced tumor growth and widespread metastasis in mice. Their application to current xenograft models of breast cancer offers rapid and highly sensitive detection options for preclinical assessment of anticancer therapies in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15987449
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8960
      1. Author :
        Shan, Liang; Wang, Songping; Korotcov, Alexandru; Sridhar, Rajagopalan; Wang, Paul C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Ethnicity & disease
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        2 Suppl 2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Mammary Neoplasms, Animal; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION Convenient animal models are needed to study the progression and treatment of human tumors in vivo. Luciferase-based bioluminescent imaging (BLI) enables researchers to monitor tumors noninvasively and is sensitive to subtle changes in tumors. METHODS Three human breast cancer models in nude mice were established by using luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231-luc cells. They were subcutaneous xenografts (n = 8), mammary gland xenografts (n = 5), and lung metastases (n = 3). The tumors were imaged in live mice by using a highly sensitive BLI system. The relationship between the intensity of bioluminescence from the tumor was analyzed with respect to tumor volume. Bioluminescent signals from lung metastases were studied to determine the threshold of detectability. RESULTS Tumors growing in the mice's backs and mammary gland fat pads were imaged dynamically after administration of D-luciferin. The bioluminescent intensity from the tumors gradually increased and then decreased in a one-hour span. The time to reach maximum signal intensity differed significantly among tumors and was independent of tumor volume and unrelated to maximum signal intensity. A significant correlation was observed between tumor volume and maximum signal intensity in tumors from both sites. Lung metastatic lesions of .3-.5 mm in diameter were clearly detectable through the entire animal imaging process. CONCLUSION The animal models established with luciferase-expressing cancer cells in combination with BLI provide a system for rapid, noninvasive, and quantitative analysis of tumor biomass and metastasis. This biosystem simplifies in vivo monitoring of tumors and will be useful for noninvasive investigation of tumor growth and response to therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18646323
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8991
      1. Author :
        Lambrechts, Saskia A G; Demidova, Tatiana N; Aalders, Maurice C G; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Burns; Mice; Photochemotherapy; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell death. We used PDT mediated by meso-mono-phenyl-tri(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (PTMPP) to treat burn wounds in mice with established Staphylococcus aureus infections The third degree burn wounds were infected with bioluminescent S. aureus. PDT was applied after one day of bacterial growth by adding a 25% DMSO/500 microM PTMPP solution to the wound followed by illumination with red light and periodic imaging of the mice using a sensitive camera to detect the bioluminescence. More than 98% of the bacteria were eradicated after a light dose of 210 J cm(-2) in the presence of PTMPP. However, bacterial re-growth was observed. Light alone or PDT both delayed the wound healing. These data suggest that PDT has the potential to rapidly reduce the bacterial load in infected burns. The treatment needs to be optimized to reduce wound damage and prevent recurrence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15986057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9993
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