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      1. Author :
        G. Blum
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Current Opinion in Drug Discovery Development
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Biology; Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Proteases; pathology; biological markers; fluorescence imaging reagents; in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Proteases play pivotal roles in the normal function of cells. In addition, the expression and activity of proteases are significantly upregulated in several pathologies, including cancer, arthritis and atherosclerosis, and hence they can be considered to be biological markers for these pathologies. The hydrolyzing activity of proteases has been used to generate a variety of fluorescent imaging reagents, the design and utility of which are reviewed here. The use of imaging reagents to visualize protease activity allows for improved detection of various pathologies as well as the ability to monitor the efficacy of therapies in vivo and provide molecular information regarding the nature of the pathology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18729022
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4475
      1. Author :
        Lee, H. L.; Chen, C. C.; Baasov, T.; Ron, Y.; Dougherty, J. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        RediJect Coelenterazine h, XenoLight
      12. Abstract :
        Cells have developed a mechanism to discriminate between premature termination codons (PTCs) and normal stop codons during translation, sparking vigorous research to develop drugs promoting readthrough at PTCs to treat genetic disorders caused by PTCs. It was posed that this concept could also be applied to regulated gene therapy protocols by incorporating a PTC into a therapeutic gene, so active protein would only be made after administration of a readthrough agent. The strengths of the system are highlighted here by results demonstrating: (i) background expression levels were reduced to 0.01% to 0.0005% of wild type in unselected mass populations of cells depending upon the specific stop codon utilized and its position within the gene; (ii) expression levels responded well to multiple “On” and “Off” regulation cycles in vivo in human xenograft systems; (iii) the level of induction approached three logs using aminoglycoside activators including NB54, a newly synthesized aminoglycoside with significantly reduced toxicity; and (iv) expression levels could be appreciably altered when employing different promoters in a variety of cell types. These results strongly support the contention that this system should have important clinical applications when tight control of gene expression is required.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21587212
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10422
      1. Author :
        Zhang, J.; Preda, D. V.; Vasquez, K. O.; Morin, J.; Delaney, J.; Bao, B.; Percival, M. D.; Xu, D.; McKay, D.; Klimas, M.; Bednar, B.; Sur, C.; Gao, D. Z.; Madden, K.; Yared, W.; Rajopadhye, M.; Peterson, J. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Am J Physiol Renal Physiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        303
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        F593-603
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ReninSense 680 FAST, FMT, Animal Feed/analysis; Animals; Cathepsin D; Cathepsin G; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/*pharmacology; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Peptides/*pharmacology; Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism; Rats; Renin/*blood/*metabolism; Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium, Dietary
      12. Abstract :
        The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is well studied for its regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis, as well as for increased activity associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and kidney disease. The enzyme renin cleaves angiotensinogen to form angiotensin I (ANG I), which is further cleaved by angiotensin-converting enzyme to produce ANG II. Although ANG II is the main effector molecule of the RAS, renin is the rate-limiting enzyme, thus playing a pivotal role in regulating RAS activity in hypertension and organ injury processes. Our objective was to develop a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) renin-imaging agent for noninvasive in vivo detection of renin activity as a measure of tissue RAS and in vitro plasma renin activity. We synthesized a renin-activatable agent, ReninSense 680 FAST (ReninSense), using a NIRF-quenched substrate derived from angiotensinogen that is cleaved specifically by purified mouse and rat renin enzymes to generate a fluorescent signal. This agent was assessed in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo to detect and quantify increases in plasma and kidney renin activity in sodium-sensitive inbred C57BL/6 mice maintained on a low dietary sodium and diuretic regimen. Noninvasive in vivo fluorescence molecular tomographic imaging of the ReninSense signal in the kidney detected increased renin activity in the kidneys of hyperreninemic C57BL/6 mice. The agent also effectively detected renin activity in ex vivo kidneys, kidney tissue sections, and plasma samples. This approach could provide a new tool for assessing disorders linked to altered tissue and plasma renin activity and to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic treatments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22674025
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10572
      1. Author :
        David G Kirsch; Daniela M Dinulescu; John B Miller; Jan Grimm; Philip M Santiago1; Nathan P Young; G Petur Nielsen; Bradley J Quade; Christopher J Chaber; Christian P Schultz; Osamu Takeuchi; Roderick T Bronson; Denise Crowley; Stanley J Korsmeyer; Sam S Yoon; Francis J Hornicek; Ralph Weissleder; Tyler Jacks
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Nature Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        sarcoma; imaging; apoptosis; metatasis; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Soft tissue sarcomas are mesenchymal tumors that are fatal in approximately one-third of patients. To explore mechanisms of sarcoma pathogenesis, we have generated a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma. Intramuscular delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase in mice with conditional mutations in Kras and Trp53 was sufficient to initiate high-grade sarcomas with myofibroblastic differentiation. Like human sarcomas, these tumors show a predilection for lung rather than lymph node metastasis. Using this model, we showed that a prototype handheld imaging device can identify residual tumor during intraoperative molecular imaging. Deletion of the Ink4a-Arf locus (Cdkn2a), but not Bak1 and Bax, could substitute for mutation of Trp53 in this model. Deletion of Bak1 and Bax, however, was able to substitute for mutation of Trp53 in the development of sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis seems sufficient to mediate p53 tumor suppression in an epithelial cancer, but not in this model of soft tissue sarcoma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v13/n8/abs/nm1602.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4506
      1. Author :
        J-C Tseng; T Granot; V DiGiacomo; B Levin; D Meruelo
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Sindbis virus; viral vector; vascular leakiness; molecular imaging; chemotherapy; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/cgt/journal/v17/n4/full/cgt200970a.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4485
      1. Author :
        Xiao, K.; Li, Y.; Lee, J. S.; Gonik, A. M.; Dong, T.; Fung, G.; Sanchez, E.; Xing, L.; Cheng, H. R.; Luo, J.; Lam, K. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        SKOV3-luc-D3, SKOV3-luc, IVIS, Ovarian Cancer, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/*administration & dosage; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/therapeutic use; Drug Delivery Systems/*methods; Female; Flow Cytometry; Humans; Integrin alpha Chains/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Nude; Micelles; Microscopy, Confocal; Nanoparticles/chemistry/therapeutic use; Ovarian Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Paclitaxel/*administration & dosage; Peptides/chemical synthesis/therapeutic use; Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Micellar nanoparticles based on linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) block dendritic cholic acids (CA) copolymers (telodendrimers), for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of cancers, are reported. The micellar nanoparticles have been decorated with a high-affinity “OA02” peptide against alpha-3 integrin receptor to improve the tumor-targeting specificity which is overexpressed on the surface of ovarian cancer cells. “Click chemistry” was used to conjugate alkyne-containing OA02 peptide to the azide group at the distal terminus of the PEG chain in a representative PEG(5k)-CA(8) telodendrimer (micelle-forming unit). The conjugation of OA02 peptide had negligible influence on the physicochemical properties of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles and as hypothesized, OA02 peptide dramatically enhanced the uptake efficiency of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles (NP) in SKOV-3 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, but not in alpha-3 integrin-negative K562 leukemia cells. When loaded with paclitaxel, OA02-NPs had significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity against both SKOV-3 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells as compared with nontargeted nanoparticles. Furthermore, the in vivo biodistribution study showed OA02 peptide greatly facilitated tumor localization and the intracellular uptake of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles into ovarian cancer cells as validated in SKOV3-luc tumor-bearing mice. Finally, paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded OA02-NPs exhibited superior antitumor efficacy and lower systemic toxicity profile in nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumor xenografts, when compared with equivalent doses of nontargeted PTX-NPs as well as clinical paclitaxel formulation (Taxol). Therefore, OA02-targeted telodendrimers loaded with paclitaxel have great potential as a new therapeutic approach for patients with ovarian cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22396491
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10543
      1. Author :
        Filip K. Swirski, Matthias Nahrendorf, Martin Etzrodt, Moritz Wildgruber, Virna Cortez-Retamozo, Peter Panizzi, Jose-Luiz Figueiredo, Rainer H. Kohler, Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Peter Waterman, Elena Aikawa, Thorsten R. Mempel, Peter Libby, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Science
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        325
      8. Issue :
        5940
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research; Immunology
      11. Keywords :
        splenic monocytes; in vivo imaging; ProSense; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        A current paradigm states that monocytes circulate freely and patrol blood vessels but differentiate irreversibly into dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages upon tissue entry. Here we show that bona fide undifferentiated monocytes reside in the spleen and outnumber their equivalents in circulation. The reservoir monocytes assemble in clusters in the cords of the subcapsular red pulp and are distinct from macrophages and DCs. In response to ischemic myocardial injury, splenic monocytes increase their motility, exit the spleen en masse, accumulate in injured tissue, and participate in wound healing. These observations uncover a role for the spleen as a site for storage and rapid deployment of monocytes and identify splenic monocytes as a resource that the body exploits to regulate inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencemag.org/content/325/5940/612.abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4567
      1. Author :
        Phillips, W. T.; Goins, B.; Bao, A.; Vargas, D.; Guttierez, J. E.; Trevino, A.; Miller, J. R.; Henry, J.; Zuniga, R.; Vecil, G.; Brenner, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neuro Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        416-25
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U-87 MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, Glioma, Bioware, IVIS, Animals; Brachytherapy/*methods; Brain Neoplasms/pathology/*radiotherapy; Convection; Glioblastoma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Glioma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Liposomes; Nanoparticles/therapeutic use; Radioisotopes/*therapeutic use; Rats; Rhenium/*therapeutic use; Tumor Burden; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Although external beam radiation is an essential component to the current standard treatment of primary brain tumors, its application is limited by toxicity at doses more than 80 Gy. Recent studies have suggested that brachytherapy with liposomally encapsulated radionuclides may be of benefit, and we have reported methods to markedly increase the specific activity of rhenium-186 ((186)Re)-liposomes. To better characterize the potential delivery, toxicity, and efficacy of the highly specific activity of (186)Re-liposomes, we evaluated their intracranial application by convection-enhanced delivery in an orthotopic U87 glioma rat model. After establishing an optimal volume of 25 microL, we observed focal activity confined to the site of injection over a 96-hour period. Doses of up to 1850 Gy were administered without overt clinical or microscopic evidence of toxicity. Animals treated with (186)Re-liposomes had a median survival of 126 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.4-173 days), compared with 49 days (95% CI, 44-53 days) for controls. Log-rank analysis between these 2 groups was highly significant (P = .0013) and was even higher when 100 Gy was used as a cutoff (P < .0001). Noninvasive luciferase imaging as a surrogate for tumor volume showed a statistically significant separation in bioluminescence by 11 days after 100 Gy or less treatment between the experimental group and the control animals (chi(2)[1, N= 19] = 4.8; P = .029). MRI also supported this difference in tumor size. Duplication of tumor volume differences and survival benefit was possible in a more invasive U251 orthotopic model, with clear separation in bioluminescence at 6 days after treatment (chi(2)[1, N= 9] = 4.7; P = .029); median survival in treated animals was not reached at 120 days because lack of mortality, and log-rank analysis of survival was highly significant (P = .0057). Analysis of tumors by histology revealed minimal areas of necrosis and gliosis. These results support the potential efficacy of the highly specific activity of brachytherapy by (186)Re-liposomes convection-enhanced delivery in glioma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22427110
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10500
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