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      1. Author :
        Wang, S.; Noberini, R.; Stebbins, J. L.; Das, S.; Zhang, Z.; Wu, B.; Mitra, S.; Billet, S.; Fernandez, A.; Bhowmick, N. A.; Kitada, S.; Pasquale, E. B.; Fisher, P. B.; Pellecchia, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Clin Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: YSA is an EphA2-targeting peptide that effectively delivers anticancer agents to prostate cancer tumors. Here, we report on how we increased the drug-like properties of this delivery system. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: By introducing non-natural amino acids, we have designed two new EphA2 targeting peptides: YNH, where norleucine and homoserine replace the two methionine residues of YSA, and dYNH, where a D-tyrosine replaces the L-tyrosine at the first position of the YNH peptide. We describe the details of the synthesis of YNH and dYNH paclitaxel conjugates (YNH-PTX and dYNH-PTX) and their characterization in cells and in vivo. RESULTS: dYNH-PTX showed improved stability in mouse serum and significantly reduced tumor size in a prostate cancer xenograft model and also reduced tumor vasculature in a syngeneic orthotopic allograft mouse model of renal cancer compared with vehicle or paclitaxel treatments. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that targeting EphA2 with dYNH drug conjugates could represent an effective way to deliver anticancer agents to a variety of tumor types. Clin Cancer Res; 19(1); 128-37. (c)2012 AACR.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23155185
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10541
      1. Author :
        Zuluaga, M. F.; Sekkat, N.; Gabriel, D.; van den Bergh, H.; Lange, N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Cancer Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Frequent side effects of radical treatment modalities and the availability of novel diagnostics have raised the interest in focal therapies for localized prostate cancer. To improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficacy of such therapies, we developed a minimally invasive procedure, based on a novel polymeric photosensitizer prodrug sensitive to urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA). The compound is inactive in its prodrug form and accumulates passively at the tumor site by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. There, the prodrug is selectively converted to its photoactive form by uPA which is over-expressed by prostate cancer cells. Irradiation of the activated photosensitizer exerts a tumor-selective phototoxic effect. The prodrug alone (8 microM) showed no toxic effect on PC-3 cells, but upon irradiation the cell viability was reduced by 90%. In vivo, after systemic administration of the prodrug, PC-3 xenografts became selectively fluorescent. This is indicative of the prodrug accumulation in the tumor and selective local enzymatic activation. Qualitative analysis of the activated compound confirmed that the enzymatic cleavage occurred selectively in the tumor, with only trace amounts in the neighboring skin or muscle. Subsequent photodynamic therapy studies demonstrated complete tumor eradication of animals treated with light (150 J/cm2 at 665 nm) 16 hours after the injection of the prodrug (7.5 mg/kg). These promising results evidence the excellent selectivity of our prodrug with the potential to be used for both, imaging and therapy of localized prostate cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23270928
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10542
      1. Author :
        Shiota, M.; Zardan, A.; Takeuchi, A.; Kumano, M.; Beraldi, E.; Naito, S.; Zoubeidi, A.; Gleave, M. E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Base Sequence; Blotting, Western; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation; Clusterin/genetics/*physiology; DNA Primers; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/*physiology; Humans; Male; Mice; *Neoplasm Metastasis; Nuclear Proteins/*physiology; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Prostatic Neoplasms/*pathology; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Transforming Growth Factor beta/*physiology; Twist Transcription Factor/*physiology
      12. Abstract :
        TGF-beta promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and induces clusterin (CLU) expression, linking these genes to cancer metastasis. CLU is a pleiotropic molecular chaperone that confers survival and proliferative advantage to cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-beta regulates CLU expression and CLU affects metastasis remain unknown. In this study, we report that the transcription factor Twist1 mediates TGF-beta-induced CLU expression. By binding to E-boxes in the distal promoter region of CLU gene, Twist1 regulated basal and TGF-beta-induced CLU transcription. In addition, CLU reduction reduced TGF-beta induction of the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin and fibronectin, thereby inhibiting the migratory and invasive properties induced by TGF-beta. Targeted inhibition of CLU also suppressed metastasis in an in vivo model. Taken together, our findings indicate that CLU is an important mediator of TGF-beta-induced EMT, and suggest that CLU suppression may represent a promising therapeutic option for suppressing prostate cancer metastatic progression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22896337
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10540
      1. Author :
        Korotcov, A. V.; Ye, Y.; Chen, Y.; Zhang, F.; Huang, S.; Lin, S.; Sridhar, R.; Achilefu, S.; Wang, P. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Endocytosis; Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry/*diagnostic use; Glucosamine/chemistry/*diagnostic use; Humans; Kinetics; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Molecular Imaging/*methods; Neoplasms/*diagnosis/pathology; Optical Devices; Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis/pathology; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Tissue Distribution; *Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive technique for studying diseases at the molecular level in vivo. Glucose transporters are often used as targets for in vivo imaging of tumors. The efficiency of a tumor-seeking fluorescent probe can be enhanced by attaching one or more glucosamine (GlcN) moieties. This study was designed to evaluate the use of previously developed GlcN-linked NIRF probes for in vitro and in vivo optical imaging of cancer. PROCEDURES: Cellular uptake of the probes (1 muM) was investigated in monolayer cultures of luciferase-expressing PC3 (PC3-luc) cells. The prostate tumors were established as subcutaneous xenografts using PC3-luc cells in nude mice. The biodistributions and tumor-targeting specificities of cypate (cyp), cypate-D: -(+)-glucosamine (cyp-GlcN), and D: -(+)-gluosamine-cypate-D: -(+)-gluosamine (cyp-2GlcN) were studied. The tumor, muscle, and major organs were collected for ex vivo optical imaging. RESULTS: The tumor cell uptake of the probe containing two glucosamine residues, cyp-2GlcN, was significantly higher than the uptake of both the probe with one glucosamine residue, cyp-GlcN, and the probe without glucosamine, cyp only. Similarly, in in vivo experiments, cyp-2GlcN demonstrated higher maximum fluorescence intensity and longer residence lifetime in tumors than cyp-GlcN or cyp. The ex vivo biodistribution analysis revealed that tumor uptake of cyp-2GlcN and cyp-GlcN was four- and twofold higher than that of cyp at 24 h post-injection, respectively. CONCLUSION: Both cyp-GlcN and cyp-2GlcN NIRF probes exhibited good tumor-targeting properties in prostate cancer cell cultures and live mice. The cyp-2GlcN probe showed the highest uptake with good retention characteristics in vivo. The uptake of cyp-2GlcN and cyp-GlcN is likely mediated by glucosamine-recognizing transporters. The uptake mechanism is being explored further for developing cypate-glucosamine-based probes for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21971932
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10536
      1. Author :
        Noberini, R.; Rubio de la Torre, E.; Pasquale, E. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cell Adh Migr
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Chromatography, Liquid; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Ephrins/genetics/*metabolism; Humans; Mass Spectrometry/*methods; Mice; Receptor, EphA1/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family includes many members, which are often expressed together in various combinations and can promiscuously interact with multiple ephrin ligands, generating intricate networks of intracellular signals that control physiological and pathological processes. Knowing the entire repertoire of Eph receptors and ephrins expressed in a biological sample is important when studying their biological roles. Moreover, given the correlation between Eph receptor/ephrin expression and cancer pathogenesis, their expression patterns could serve important diagnostic and prognostic purposes. However, profiling Eph receptor and ephrin expression has been challenging. Here we describe a novel and straightforward approach to catalog the Eph receptors present in cultured cells and tissues. By measuring the binding of ephrin Fc fusion proteins to Eph receptors in ELISA and pull-down assays, we determined that a mixture of four ephrins is suitable for isolating both EphA and EphB receptors in a single pull-down. We then used mass spectrometry to identify the Eph receptors present in the pull-downs and estimate their relative levels. This approach was validated in cultured human cancer cell lines, human tumor xenograft tissue grown in mice, and mouse brain tissue. The new mass spectrometry approach we have developed represents a useful tool for the identification of the spectrum of Eph receptors present in a biological sample and could also be extended to profiling ephrin expression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22568954
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10538
      1. Author :
        Liu, W.; McDaniel, J.; Li, X.; Asai, D.; Quiroz, F. G.; Schaal, J.; Park, J. S.; Zalutsky, M.; Chilkoti, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Brachytherapy is a common clinical technique involving implantation of sealed radioactive “seeds” within a tumor to selectively irradiate the tumor mass while minimizing systemic toxicity. To mitigate the disadvantages associated with complex surgical implantation and subsequent device removal procedures, we have developed an alternative approach using a genetically encoded peptide polymer solution composed of a thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) radiolabeled with (131)I that self-assembles into radionuclide seeds upon intratumoral injection. The formation of these nontoxic and biodegradable polymer seeds led to prolonged intratumoral retention (~85% ID/tumor 7 days postinjection) of the radionuclide, elicited a tumor growth delay in 100% of the tumors in two human xenografts (FaDu and PC-3), and cured more than 67% of tumor-bearing animals after a single administration of labeled ELP. These results suggest that in situ self-assembly of biodegradable and injectable radionuclide-containing polypeptide seeds could be a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional brachytherapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23155121
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10487
      1. Author :
        Marra, M.; Salzano, G.; Leonetti, C.; Porru, M.; Franco, R.; Zappavigna, S.; Liguori, G.; Botti, G.; Chieffi, P.; Lamberti, M.; Vitale, G.; Abbruzzese, A.; La Rotonda, M. I.; De Rosa, G.; Caraglia, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Biotechnol Adv
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is a drug whose potent anti-cancer activity is limited by its short plasma half-life and rapid uptake and accumulation within bone. We have recently proposed new delivery systems to avoid ZOL accumulation into the bone, thus improving extra-skeletal bioavailability. In this work, we have compared the technological and anti-cancer features of either ZOL-containing self-assembly PEGylated nanoparticles (NPs) or ZOL-encapsulating PEGylated liposomes (LIPO-ZOL). ZOL-containing NPs showed superior technological characteristics in terms of mean diameter, size distribution, and ZOL encapsulation efficiency, compared to LIPO-ZOL. Moreover, the anti-cancer activity of NPs in nude mice xenografted with prostate cancer PC3 cells was higher than that one induced by LIPO-ZOL. In addition, NPs induced the complete remission of tumour xenografts and an increase of survival time higher than that one observed with LIPO-ZOL. It has also to be considered that PC3 tumour xenografts were almost completely resistant to the anti-cancer effects induced by free ZOL. Both nanotechnological products did not induce toxic effects not affecting the mice weight nor inducing deaths. Moreover, the histological examination of some vital organs such as liver, kidney and spleen did not find any changes in terms of necrotic effects or modifications in the inflammatory infiltrate. On the other hand, NPs but not LIPO-ZOL caused a statistically significant reduction of the tumour associated macrophages (TAM) in tumour xenografts. This effect was paralleled by a significant increase of both necrotic and apoptotic indexes. The effects of the NPs were also higher in terms of neo-angiogenesis inhibition. These results suggest the future preclinical development of ZOL-encapsulating NPs in the treatment of human cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21741464
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10488
      1. Author :
        Zollo, M.; Di Dato, V.; Spano, D.; De Martino, D.; Liguori, L.; Marino, N.; Vastolo, V.; Navas, L.; Garrone, B.; Mangano, G.; Biondi, G.; Guglielmotti, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Clin Exp Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Chemokine CCL2/*biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism; Female; Humans; Indazoles/*pharmacology; Macrophages/metabolism; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; NF-kappa B/metabolism; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; Propionates/*pharmacology; Prostatic Neoplasms/*pathology; Signal Transduction
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate and breast cancer are major causes of death worldwide, mainly due to patient relapse upon disease recurrence through formation of metastases. Chemokines are small proteins with crucial roles in the immune system, and their regulation is finely tuned in early inflammatory responses. They are key molecules during inflammatory processes, and many studies are focusing on their regulatory functions in tumor growth and angiogenesis during metastatic cell seeding and spreading. Bindarit is an anti-inflammatory indazolic derivative that can inhibit the synthesis of MCP-1/CCL2, with a potential inhibitory function in tumor progression and metastasis formation. We show here that in vitro, bindarit can modulate cancer-cell proliferation and migration, mainly through negative regulation of TGF-beta and AKT signaling, and it can impair the NF-kappaB signaling pathway through enhancing the expression of the NF-kappaB inhibitor IkB-alpha. In vivo administration of bindarit results in impaired metastatic disease in prostate cancer xenograft mice (PC-3M-Luc2 cells injected intra-cardially) and impairment of local tumorigenesis in syngeneic Balb/c mice injected under the mammary gland with murine breast cancer cells (4T1-Luc cells). In addition, bindarit treatment significantly decreases the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in 4T1-Luc primary tumors. Overall, our data indicate that bindarit is a good candidate for new therapies against prostate and breast tumorigenesis, with an action through impairment of inflammatory cell responses during formation of the tumor-stroma niche microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22484917
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10489
      1. Author :
        Hensley, H. H.; Roder, N. A.; O'Brien, S. W.; Bickel, L. E.; Xiao, F.; Litwin, S.; Connolly, D. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense, IntegriSense, MMPSense, Annexin-Vivo, Annexin vivo, IVIS, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage/pharmacology; Carcinoma/*diagnosis/*metabolism/pathology; Cathepsins/metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Disease Progression; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry/metabolism; Integrin alphaVbeta3/metabolism; Integrins/genetics/*metabolism; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Matrix Metalloproteinases/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; *Molecular Imaging; Ovarian Neoplasms/*diagnosis/drug therapy/*metabolism; Peptide Hydrolases/*metabolism; Protein Binding; Tumor Burden/drug effects
      12. Abstract :
        Most patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) experience drug-resistant disease recurrence. Identification of new treatments is a high priority, and preclinical studies in mouse models of EOC may expedite this goal. We previously developed methods for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for tumor detection and quantification in a transgenic mouse model of EOC. The goal of this study was to determine whether three-dimensional (3D) fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and fluorescent molecular imaging probes could be effectively used for in vivo detection of ovarian tumors and response to therapy. Ovarian tumor-bearing TgMISIIR-TAg mice injected with fluorescent probes were subjected to MRI and FMT. Tumor-specific probe retention was identified in vivo by alignment of the 3D data sets, confirmed by ex vivo fluorescent imaging and correlated with histopathologic findings. Mice were treated with standard chemotherapy, and changes in fluorescent probe binding were detected by MRI and FMT. Ovarian tumors were detected using probes specific for cathepsin proteases, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and integrin alpha(v)beta(3). Cathepsin and integrin alpha(v)beta(3) probe activation and retention correlated strongly with tumor volume. MMP probe activation was readily detected in tumors but correlated less strongly with tumor volume. Tumor regression associated with response to therapy was detected and quantified by serial MRI and FMT. These results demonstrate the feasibility and sensitivity of FMT for detection and quantification of tumor-associated biologic targets in ovarian tumors and support the translational utility of molecular imaging to assess functional response to therapy in mouse models of EOC.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22787427
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10425
      1. Author :
        Liu, W. F.; Ma, M.; Bratlie, K. M.; Dang, T. T.; Langer, R.; Anderson, D. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense, IVIS, Animals; Biocompatible Materials/*adverse effects; Cells, Cultured; Free Radicals/metabolism; Immunohistochemistry; Male; Mice; Prostheses and Implants/*adverse effects; Reactive Oxygen Species/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The non-specific host response to implanted biomaterials is often a key challenge of medical device design. To evaluate biocompatibility, measuring the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by inflammatory cells in response to biomaterial surfaces is a well-established method. However, the detection of ROS in response to materials implanted in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we develop a bioluminescence whole animal imaging approach to observe ROS released in response to subcutaneously-implanted materials in live animals. We compared the real-time generation of ROS in response to two representative materials, polystyrene and alginate, over the course of 28 days. High levels of ROS were observed near polystyrene, but not alginate implants, and persisted throughout the course of 28 days. Histological analysis revealed that high levels of ROS correlated not only with the presence of phagocytic cells at early timepoints, but also fibrosis at later timepoints, suggesting that ROS may be involved in both the acute and chronic phase of the foreign body response. These data are the first in vivo demonstration of ROS generation in response to implanted materials, and describe a novel technique to evaluate the host response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21146868
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10428
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