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      1. Author :
        Sadikot, R. T.; Blackwell, T. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Methods Mol Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        477
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenoviridae/genetics, Anesthesia, Animals, Firefly Luciferin/administration & dosage/pharmacology, *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects, Genetic Vectors/genetics, Luciferases/metabolism, Luminescent Measurements/*methods, Mice, Photons, Whole Body Imaging/*methods IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging offers many unique opportunities to study biological processes in intact organisms. Bioluminescence is the emission of light from biochemical reactions that occur within a living organism. Luciferase has been used as a reporter gene in transgenic mice but, until bioluminescence imaging was described, the detection of luciferase activity required either sectioning of the animal or excision of tissue and homogenization to measure enzyme activities in a conventional luminometer. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is based on the idea that biological light sources can be incorporated into cells and animal models artificially that does not naturally express the luminescent genes. This imaging modality has proven to be a very powerful methodology to detect luciferase reporter activity in intact animal models. This form of optical imaging is low cost and noninvasive and facilitates real-time analysis of disease processes at the molecular level in living organisms. Bioluminescence provides a noninvasive method to monitor gene expression in vivo and has enormous potential to elucidate the pathobiology of lung diseases in intact mouse models, including models of inflammation/injury, infection, and cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19082962
      14. Call Number :
        142705
      15. Serial :
        5558
      1. Author :
        Beckers, Annelies; Organe, Sophie; Timmermans, Leen; Vanderhoydonc, Frank; Deboel, Ludo; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Brusselmans, Koen; Verhoeven, Guido; Swinnen, Johannes V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenosine Triphosphate; Aminoimidazole Carboxamide; AMP-Activated Protein Kinases; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Cell Line, Tumor; DNA, Neoplasm; Drug Synergism; Enzyme Activation; Humans; Lipids; Methotrexate; Multienzyme Complexes; Nucleotide Deaminases; PC-3M-luc; Phosphoribosylaminoimidazolecarboxamide Formyltransferase; Phosphoribosylglycinamide Formyltransferase; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; Purines; Ribonucleosides; Ribonucleotides; RNA Interference
      12. Abstract :
        Because of its ability to mimic a low energy status of the cell, the cell-permeable nucleoside 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (AICA) riboside was proposed as an antineoplastic agent switching off major energy-consuming processes associated with the malignant phenotype (lipid production, DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, cell migration, etc.). Key to the antineoplastic action of AICA riboside is its conversion to ZMP, an AMP mimetic that at high concentrations activates the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Here, in an attempt to increase the efficacy of AICA riboside, we pretreated cancer cells with methotrexate, an antimetabolite blocking the metabolism of ZMP. Methotrexate enhanced the AICA riboside-induced accumulation of ZMP and led to a decrease in the levels of ATP, which functions as an intrasteric inhibitor of AMPK. Consequently, methotrexate markedly sensitized AMPK for activation by AICA riboside and potentiated the inhibitory effects of AICA riboside on tumor-associated processes. As cotreatment elicited antiproliferative effects already at concentrations of compounds that were only marginally effective when used alone, our findings on the cooperation between methotrexate and AICA riboside provide new opportunities both for the application of classic antimetabolic chemotherapeutics, such as methotrexate, and for the exploitation of the energy-sensing machinery as a target for cancer intervention.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16985054
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8978
      1. Author :
        Herzog, E.; Taruttis, A.; Beziere, N.; Lutich, A. A.; Razansky, D.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Radiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        263
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenocarcinoma/*diagnosis; Animals; Colonic Neoplasms/*diagnosis; Contrast Media/pharmacokinetics; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/pharmacokinetics; Gold/pharmacokinetics; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Indocyanine Green/pharmacokinetics; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis; Mice; Nanoparticles; Spectrum Analysis/methods; Tomography, Optical/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To investigate whether multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) can reveal the heterogeneous distributions of exogenous agents of interest and vascular characteristics through tumors of several millimeters in diameter in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Procedures involving animals were approved by the government of Upper Bavaria. Imaging of subcutaneous tumors in mice was performed by using an experimental MSOT setup that produces transverse images at 10 frames per second with an in-plane resolution of approximately 150 mum. To study dynamic contrast enhancement, three mice with 4T1 tumors were imaged before and immediately, 20 minutes, 4 hours, and 24 hours after systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG). Epifluorescence imaging was used for comparison. MSOT of a targeted fluorescent agent (6 hours after injection) and hemoglobin oxygenation was performed simultaneously (4T1 tumors: n = 3). Epifluorescence of cryosections served as validation. The accumulation owing to enhanced permeability and retention in tumors (4T1 tumors: n = 4, HT29 tumors: n = 3, A2780 tumors: n = 2) was evaluated with use of long-circulating gold nanorods (before and immediately, 1 hour, 5 hours, and 24 hours after injection). Dark-field microscopy was used for validation. RESULTS: Dynamic contrast enhancement with ICG was possible. MSOT, in contrast to epifluorescence imaging, showed a heterogeneous intratumoral agent distribution. Simultaneous imaging of a targeted fluorescent agent and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin gave functional information about tumor vasculature in addition to the related agent uptake. The accumulation of gold nanorods in tumors seen at MSOT over time also showed heterogeneous uptake. CONCLUSION: MSOT enables live high-spatial-resolution observations through tumors, producing images of distributions of fluorochromes and nanoparticles as well as tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22517960
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10365
      1. Author :
        Mitchell, Dianne; Pobre, Eileen G; Mulivor, Aaron W; Grinberg, Asya V; Castonguay, Roselyne; Monnell, Travis E; Solban, Nicolas; Ucran, Jeffrey A; Pearsall, R Scott; Underwood, Kathryn W; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Activin Receptors, Type II; Animals; Bioware; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins; CHO Cells; Cricetinae; Cricetulus; Endothelial Cells; Endothelium, Vascular; Growth Differentiation Factor 2; Humans; MCF-7-luc-F5 cells; Mice; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Surface Plasmon Resonance; Telangiectasia, Hereditary Hemorrhagic
      12. Abstract :
        Activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ALK1) is a type I, endothelial cell-specific member of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of receptors known to play an essential role in modulating angiogenesis and vessel maintenance. In the present study, we sought to examine the angiogenic and tumorigenic effects mediated upon the inhibition of ALK1 signaling using a soluble chimeric protein (ALK1-Fc). Of 29 transforming growth factor-beta-related ligands screened by surface plasmon resonance, only bone morphogenetic protein (BMP9) and BMP10 displayed high-affinity binding to ALK1-Fc. In cell-based assays, ALK1-Fc inhibited BMP9-mediated Id-1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and inhibited cord formation by these cells on a Matrigel substrate. In a chick chorioallantoic membrane assay, ALK1-Fc reduced vascular endothelial growth factor-, fibroblast growth factor-, and BMP10-mediated vessel formation. The growth of B16 melanoma explants was also inhibited significantly by ALK1-Fc in this assay. Finally, ALK1-Fc treatment reduced tumor burden in mice receiving orthotopic grafts of MCF7 mammary adenocarcinoma cells. These data show the efficacy of chimeric ALK1-Fc proteins in mitigating vessel formation and support the view that ALK1-Fc is a powerful antiangiogenic agent capable of blocking vascularization.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20124460
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9010
      1. Author :
        Quintela-Fandino, Miguel; Arpaia, Enrico; Brenner, Dirk; Goh, Theo; Yeung, Faith Au; Blaser, Heiko; Alexandrova, Roumiana; Lind, Evan F; Tusche, Mike W; Wakeham, Andrew; Ohashi, Pamela S; Mak, Tak W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        107
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Actins; Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cofilin 1; Cytoskeleton; Female; Humans; Immunoblotting; Immunoprecipitation; Male; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Neoplasm Metastasis; Phosphorylation; Protein Binding; Protein Kinases; Protein Phosphatase 2; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; RNA Interference; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        Metastasis leads to the death of most cancer patients, and basal breast cancer is the most aggressive breast tumor type. Metastasis involves a complex cell migration process dependent on cytoskeletal remodeling such that targeting such remodeling in tumor cells could be clinically beneficial. Here we show that Hormonally Up-regulated Neu-associated Kinase (HUNK) is dramatically down-regulated in tumor samples and cell lines derived from basal breast cancers. Reconstitution of HUNK expression in basal breast cancer cell lines blocked actin polymerization and reduced cell motility, resulting in decreased metastases in two in vivo murine cancer models. Mechanistically, HUNK overexpression sustained the constitutive phosphorylation and inactivation of cofilin-1 (CFL-1), thereby blocking the incorporation of new actin monomers into actin filaments. HUNK reconstitution in basal breast cancer cell lines prevented protein phosphatase 2-A (PP2A), a phosphatase putatively acting on CFL-1, from binding to CFL-1. Our investigation of HUNK suggests that the interaction between PP2A and CFL-1 may be a target for antimetastasis therapy, particularly for basal breast cancers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20133759
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8951
      1. Author :
        Xu, Xiulan; Miller, Sally A; Baysal-Gurel, Fulya; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Rajashekara, Gireesh
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Applied and environmental microbiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        76
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Actinomycetales; Bioware; Genes, Reporter; Genetic Engineering; Luminescent Proteins; Lycopersicon esculentum; Mirabilis; Plant Diseases; pXen-13; Recombinant Proteins; Seeds; Staining and Labeling
      12. Abstract :
        Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes wilting and cankers, leading to severe economic losses in commercial tomato production worldwide. The disease is transmitted from infected seeds to seedlings and mechanically from plant to plant during seedling production, grafting, pruning, and harvesting. Because of the lack of tools for genetic manipulation, very little is known regarding the mechanisms of seed and seedling infection and movement of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in grafted plants, two focal points for application of bacterial canker control measures in tomato. To facilitate studies on the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis movement in tomato seed and grafted plants, we isolated a bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strain using the modified Tn1409 containing a promoterless lux reporter. A total of 19 bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis mutants were obtained. All mutants tested induced a hypersensitive response in Mirabilis jalapa and caused wilting of tomato plants. Real-time colonization studies of germinating seeds using a virulent, stable, constitutively bioluminescent strain, BL-Cmm17, showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis aggregated on hypocotyls and cotyledons at an early stage of germination. In grafted seedlings in which either the rootstock or scion was exposed to BL-Cmm17 via a contaminated grafting knife, bacteria were translocated in both directions from the graft union at higher inoculum doses. These results emphasize the use of bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to help better elucidate the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-tomato plant interactions. Further, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this tool by successful transformation of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis with Tn1409::lux. Thus, our approach would be highly useful to understand the pathogenesis of diseases caused by other subspecies of the agriculturally important C. michiganensis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400561
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9028
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research: official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acinetobacter baumannii; Acinetobacter Infections; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colistin; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial; Female; Fractures, Bone; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Osteomyelitis; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Osteomyelitis (OM) from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter has emerged in >30% of combat-related injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan. While most of these strains are sensitive to colistin, the drug is not available in bone void fillers for local high-dose delivery. To address this, we developed a mouse model with MDR strains isolated from wounded military personnel. In contrast to S. aureus OM, which is osteolytic and characterized by biofilm in necrotic bone, A. baumannii OM results in blastic lesions that do not contain apparent biofilm. We also found that mice mount a specific IgG response against three proteins (40, 47, and 56 kDa) regardless of the strain used, suggesting that these may be immuno-dominant antigens. PCR for the A. baumannii-specific parC gene confirmed a 100% infection rate with 75% of the MDR strains, and in vitro testing confirmed that all strains were sensitive to colistin. We also developed a real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) assay that could detect as few as 10 copies of parC in a sample. To demonstrate the efficacy of colistin prophylaxis in this model, mice were treated with either parenteral colistin (0.2 mg colistinmethate i.m. for 7 days), local colistin (PMMA bead impregnated with 1.0 mg colistin sulfate), or an unloaded PMMA bead control. While the parenteral colistin failed to demonstrate any significant effects versus the placebo, the colistin PMMA bead significantly reduced the infection rate such that only 29.2% of the mice had detectable levels of parC at 19 days (p < 0.05 vs. i.m. colistin and placebo).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19173261
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9043
      1. Author :
        Beckers, Annelies; Organe, Sophie; Timmermans, Leen; Scheys, Katryn; Peeters, Annelies; Brusselmans, Koen; Verhoeven, Guido; Swinnen, Johannes V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase; Apoptosis; Autophagy; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Proliferation; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Fatty Acids; Humans; Macrolides; Male; Neoplasms; Palmitic Acid; PC-3M-luc; Phospholipids; Prostatic Neoplasms; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        Development and progression of cancer is accompanied by marked changes in the expression and activity of enzymes involved in the cellular homeostasis of fatty acids. One class of enzymes that play a particularly important role in this process are the acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACC). ACCs produce malonyl-CoA, an intermediate metabolite that functions as substrate for fatty acid synthesis and as negative regulator of fatty acid oxidation. Here, using the potent ACC inhibitor soraphen A, a macrocyclic polyketide from myxobacteria, we show that ACC activity in cancer cells is essential for proliferation and survival. Even at nanomolar concentrations, soraphen A can block fatty acid synthesis and stimulate fatty acid oxidation in LNCaP and PC-3M prostate cancer cells. As a result, the phospholipid content of cancer cells decreased, and cells stopped proliferating and ultimately died. LNCaP cells predominantly died through apoptosis, whereas PC-3M cells showed signs of autophagy. Supplementation of the culture medium with exogenous palmitic acid completely abolished the effects of soraphen A and rescued the cells from cell death. Interestingly, when added to cultures of premalignant BPH-1 cells, soraphen A only slightly affected cell proliferation and did not induce cell death. Together, these findings indicate that cancer cells have become dependent on ACC activity to provide the cell with a sufficient supply of fatty acids to permit proliferation and survival, introducing the concept of using small-molecule ACC inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17804731
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8974
      1. Author :
        Burkatovskaya, Marina; Tegos, George P; Swietlik, Emilia; Demidova, Tatiana N; P Castano, Ana; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetates; Alginates; Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bandages; Bioware; Chitosan; Glucuronic Acid; Hexuronic Acids; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Occlusive Dressings; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Silver Sulfadiazine; Staphylococcus aureus; Wound Healing; Wound Infection; Xen8.1, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        HemCon bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation used as a hemostatic control dressing, and its chemical structure suggests that it should also be antimicrobial. We tested its ability to rapidly kill bacteria in vitro and in mouse models of infected wounds. We used the Gram-negative species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis and the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus that had all been stably transduced with the entire bacterial lux operon to allow in vivo bioluminescence imaging. An excisional wound in Balb/c mice was inoculated with 50-250 million cells followed after 30 min by application of HemCon bandage, alginate sponge bandage, silver sulfadiazine cream or no treatment. HemCon was more adhesive to the wound and conformed well to the injury compared to alginate. Animal survival was followed over 15 days with observations of bioluminescence emission and animal activity daily. Chitosan acetate treated mice infected with P. aeruginosa and P. mirabilis all survived while those receiving no treatment, alginate and silver sulfadiazine demonstrated 25-100% mortality. Chitosan acetate was much more effective than other treatments in rapidly reducing bioluminescence in the wound consistent with its rapid bactericidal activity in vitro as well as its light-scattering properties. S. aureus formed only non-lethal localized infections after temporary immunosuppression of the mice but HemCon was again more effective in reducing bioluminescence. The data suggest that chitosan acetate rapidly kills bacteria in the wound before systemic invasion can take place, and is superior to alginate bandage and silver sulfadiazine that may both encourage bacterial growth in the short term.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16616364
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9987