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      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Nature
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        433
      8. Issue :
        7025
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aging; Animals; Antigens, CD36; Cell Line; Dimerization; Ethylnitrosourea; Gene Deletion; Glycerides; Homozygote; Humans; Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Lipopeptides; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mutagenesis; Mutation; Oligopeptides; Peptidoglycan; Phenotype; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Toll-Like Receptors; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; Zymosan
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is required for the recognition of numerous molecular components of bacteria, fungi and protozoa. The breadth of the ligand repertoire seems unusual, even if one considers that TLR2 may form heteromers with TLRs 1 and 6 (ref. 12), and it is likely that additional proteins serve as adapters for TLR2 activation. Here we show that an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced nonsense mutation of Cd36 (oblivious) causes a recessive immunodeficiency phenotype in which macrophages are insensitive to the R-enantiomer of MALP-2 (a diacylated bacterial lipopeptide) and to lipoteichoic acid. Homozygous mice are hypersusceptible to Staphylococcus aureus infection. Cd36(obl) macrophages readily detect S-MALP-2, PAM(2)CSK(4), PAM(3)CSK(4) and zymosan, revealing that some--but not all--TLR2 ligands are dependent on CD36. Already known as a receptor for endogenous molecules, CD36 is also a selective and nonredundant sensor of microbial diacylglycerides that signal via the TLR2/6 heterodimer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15690042
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9991
      1. Author :
        Takeshita, Fumitaka; Patrawala, Lubna; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Ryou-u; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Kawamata, Masaki; Kelnar, Kevin; Bader, Andreas G; Brown, David; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular therapy: the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aged; Animals; Bioware; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Down-Regulation; Humans; Male; Mice; MicroRNAs; Middle Aged; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
      12. Abstract :
        Recent reports have linked the expression of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) with tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, we show that microRNA (miR)-16, which is expressed at lower levels in prostate cancer cells, affects the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Transient transfection with synthetic miR-16 significantly reduced cell proliferation of 22Rv1, Du145, PPC-1, and PC-3M-luc cells. A prostate cancer xenograft model revealed that atelocollagen could efficiently deliver synthetic miR-16 to tumor cells on bone tissues in mice when injected into tail veins. In the therapeutic bone metastasis model, injection of miR-16 with atelocollagen via tail vein significantly inhibited the growth of prostate tumors in bone. Cell model studies indicate that miR-16 likely suppresses prostate tumor growth by regulating the expression of genes such as CDK1 and CDK2 associated with cell-cycle control and cellular proliferation. There is a trend toward lower miR-16 expression in human prostate tumors versus normal prostate tissues. Thus, this study indicates the therapeutic potential of miRNA in an animal model of cancer metastasis with systemic miRNA injection and suggest that systemic delivery of miR-16 could be used to treat patients with advanced prostate cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19738602
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8947
      1. Author :
        Figg, William D; Li, Haiqing; Sissung, Tristan; Retter, Avi; Wu, Shenhong; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Phil; Wright, John J; Parnes, Howard; Fedenko, Kathy; Latham, Lea; Steinberg, Seth M; Jones, Elizabeth; Chen, Clara; Dahut, William
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        BJU international
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        99
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aged; Androgens; Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases; Bioware; Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System; Estramustine; Genotype; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Middle Aged; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Survival Analysis; Taxoids; Thalidomide; Treatment Outcome
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE To evaluate the combination of docetaxel plus estramustine (which prolongs survival in patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer, AIPC), and thalidomide (that also adds to docetaxel activity), both pre-clinically and clinically in AIPC. PATIENTS, MATERIALS AND METHODS In the pre-clinical evaluation we injected PC3 cells subcutaneously into severely combined immunodeficient mice and started treatment after the tumour volume reached 50 mm3. We also evaluated the combination using luciferase-labelled PC3M-luc-C6 cells in nude mice. We enrolled 20 patients with metastatic progressive AIPC into a phase II clinical trial to evaluate this combination. Docetaxel (30 mg/m2) was administered every week, for 3 of 4 weeks. The dose of thalidomide was 200 mg/day and estramustine was given three times a day at 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16 and 17 days. RESULTS In the mice, thalidomide with docetaxel plus estramustine reduced tumour volume by 88% at 17 days vs the control treatment (p=0.001). The combination of docetaxel, estramustine and thalidomide nearly eradicated the signal from the luciferase-expressing PC3M cells in the metastasis model. Clinically, the progression-free time was 7.2 months with this combination; 18 of 20 patients had a decline of half or more in prostate-specific antigen level and two of 10 patients with soft-tissue lesions had a partial response on computed tomography. There were 24 grade 3 and two grade 4 complications associated with this combination. There was a statistically significant association between overall survival and the CYP1B1*3 genotype (P=0.013). CONCLUSION Docetaxel-based chemotherapy is now regarded as a standard regimen for metastatic AIPC. The combination of estramustine, docetaxel and thalidomide is an advantageous treatment in pre-clinical models of prostate cancer and is a safe, tolerable and active regimen in patients with AIPC.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17437439
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8970
      1. Author :
        Palmer, Kelli L; Aye, Lindsay M; Whiteley, Marvin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of bacteriology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adult; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacteriological Techniques; Bioware; Culture Media; Cystic Fibrosis; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Humans; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Sputum; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        The sputum (mucus) layer of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung is a complex substrate that provides Pseudomonas aeruginosa with carbon and energy to support high-density growth during chronic colonization. Unfortunately, the CF lung sputum layer has been difficult to mimic in animal models of CF disease, and mechanistic studies of P. aeruginosa physiology during growth in CF sputum are hampered by its complexity. In this study, we performed chromatographic and enzymatic analyses of CF sputum to develop a defined, synthetic CF sputum medium (SCFM) that mimics the nutritional composition of CF sputum. Importantly, P. aeruginosa displays similar phenotypes during growth in CF sputum and in SCFM, including similar growth rates, gene expression profiles, carbon substrate preferences, and cell-cell signaling profiles. Using SCFM, we provide evidence that aromatic amino acids serve as nutritional cues that influence cell-cell signaling and antimicrobial activity of P. aeruginosa during growth in CF sputum.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17873029
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9985
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adoptive Transfer; Animals; Antigen Presentation; Autoantigens; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cancer Vaccines; dendritic cells; Endosomes; Lymphocyte Activation; Lymphoma; Mice; Mice, Knockout; T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory; Vaccination
      12. Abstract :
        Lymphoma cells are malignant cells of the T- or B-cell lineage that often express many surface markers inappropriately, yet are not recognized as abnormal by the immune system. We modeled this situation by inoculating ovalbumin-expressing E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells into mice that expressed ovalbumin as a self antigen in pancreatic islets, and investigated the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in these mice. Although vaccination with DC-expressing ovalbumin induced strong cytotoxic T-cell immunity, which led to clearance of E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells in naive C57BL/6 mice, DC vaccination was ineffective in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. Antigen modification to increase its processing via the endosomal processing pathway dramatically increased CD4 T-cell activation but paradoxically, impaired the protective effect of DC vaccination even in naive mice. Depletion of CD25(+) T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]) prior to vaccination restored the efficacy of DC vaccination and allowed eradication of lymphoma also in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. We conclude that lymphoma cells may be eradicated using DC vaccination if activation of CD25(+) Tregs is simultaneously inhibited, and that intentionally enhanced endosomal antigen processing in DC vaccines may shift the balance from CD4 T-cell help toward stimulation of Tregs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621963
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9002
      1. Author :
        Park, Hae-Sun; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Cleary, P Patrick
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        171
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Intranasal; Animals; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Intracellular Fluid; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Mucosa; Nasopharynx; Palatine Tonsil; pXen-5; Streptococcal Infections; Streptococcus pyogenes
      12. Abstract :
        Human tonsils are suspected to be an antibiotic-impervious human reservoir for group A streptococcus. An intranasal infection model in mice and a bioluminescent-tagged strain were used to investigate this possibility. Viable streptococci were predominantly found both intra- and extracellularly in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), a human tonsil homologue. Ulex europaeus-1, a membranous (M) cell-specific lectin, identified cells harboring streptococci at the epithelial surface of NALT and blocked bacterial colonization of this tissue. These results suggest that M cells in NALT transport this Gram-positive pathogen across the epithelial layers in a manner similar to those in Peyer's patches, which permit enteric pathogens to invade deeper tissues from the gastrointestinal tract.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12928403
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9025
      1. Author :
        BitMansour, A.; Burns, S. M.; Traver, D.; Akashi, K.; Contag, C. H.; Weissman, I. L.; Brown, J. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Inhalation, Animals, Animals, Congenic, Aspergillosis/microbiology/*prevention & control, *Aspergillus fumigatus, Cell Lineage, Filgrastim/pharmacology, *Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Injections, Intraperitoneal, Luminescent Measurements, Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology/*prevention & control, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Progenitor Cells/physiology/*transplantation, Neutropenia/complications/drug therapy, Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology/*prevention & control, Radiation Chimera, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Tissue Distribution IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Myelotoxic treatments for oncologic diseases are often complicated by neutropenia, which renders patients susceptible to potentially lethal infections. In these studies of murine hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cotransplantation of lineage-restricted progenitors known as common myeloid progenitors (CMP) and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMP) protects against death following otherwise lethal challenge with either of 2 pathogens associated with neutropenia: Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cotransplantation of CMP/GMP resulted in a significant and rapid increase in the absolute number of myeloid cells in the spleen, most of which were derived from the donor CMP/GMP. Despite persistent peripheral neutropenia, improved survival correlated with the measurable appearance of progenitor-derived myeloid cells in the spleen. A marked reduction or elimination of tissue pathogen load was confirmed by culture and correlated with survival. Localization of infection by P aeruginosa and extent of disease was also assessed by in vivo bioluminescent imaging using a strain of P aeruginosa engineered to constitutively express a bacterial luciferase. Imaging confirmed that transplantation with a graft containing hematopoietic stem cells and CMP/GMP reduced the bacterial load as early as 18 hours after infection. These results demonstrate that enhanced reconstitution of a tissue myeloid pool offers protection against lethal challenge with serious fungal and bacterial pathogens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=12393415
      14. Call Number :
        136279
      15. Serial :
        7031
      1. Author :
        Marttila-Ichihara, Fumiko; Castermans, Karolien; Auvinen, Kaisa; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Griffioen, Arjan W; Salmi, Marko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adjuvants, Immunologic; Allylamine; Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Antibodies, Blocking; Antibodies, Monoclonal; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Migration Inhibition; Enzyme Inhibitors; Female; Growth Inhibitors; Lymphoma, T-Cell; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Myeloid Cells; Semicarbazides
      12. Abstract :
        Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial, cell surface-expressed oxidase involved in leukocyte traffic. The adhesive function of VAP-1 can be blocked by anti-VAP-1 Abs and small-molecule inhibitors. However, the effects of VAP-1 blockade on antitumor immunity and tumor progression are unknown. In this paper, we used anti-VAP-1 mAbs and small-molecule inhibitors of VAP-1 in B16 melanoma and EL-4 lymphoma tumor models in C57BL/6 mice. Leukocyte accumulation into tumors and neoangiogenesis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and intravital videomicroscopy. We found that both anti-VAP-1 Abs and VAP-1 inhibitors reduced the number of leukocytes in the tumors, but they targeted partially different leukocyte subpopulations. Anti-VAP-1 Abs selectively inhibited infiltration of CD8-positive lymphocytes into tumors and had no effect on accumulation of myeloid cells into tumors. In contrast, the VAP-1 inhibitors significantly reduced only the number of proangiogenic Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in melanomas and lymphomas. Blocking of VAP-1 by either means left tumor homing of regulatory T cells and type 2 immune-suppressing monocytes/macrophages intact. Notably, VAP-1 inhibitors, but not anti-VAP-1 Abs, retarded the growth of melanomas and lymphomas and reduced tumor neoangiogenesis. The VAP-1 inhibitors also reduced the binding of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells to the tumor vasculature. We conclude that tumors use the catalytic activity of VAP-1 to recruit myeloid cells into tumors and to support tumor progression. Small-molecule VAP-1 inhibitors therefore might be a potential new tool for immunotherapy of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20154208
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8996
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PloS one
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adhesins, Bacterial; Animals; Antigens, CD46; Bacteremia; Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins; Bacterial Proteins; Bacterial Translocation; Bioware; Blood-Brain Barrier; Central Nervous System; Disease Progression; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Male; Meningitis, Meningococcal; Meningococcal Infections; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Nasal Cavity; pXen-13; Recombinant Fusion Proteins; Respiratory System; Sepsis; Thyroid Gland
      12. Abstract :
        Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen that causes septicemia and meningitis with high mortality. The disease progression is rapid and much remains unknown about the disease process. The understanding of disease development is crucial for development of novel therapeutic strategies and vaccines against meningococcal disease. The use of bioluminescent imaging combined with a mouse disease model allowed us to investigate the progression of meningococcal sepsis over time. Injection of bacteria in blood demonstrated waves of bacterial clearance and growth, which selected for Opa-expressing bacteria, indicating the importance of this bacterial protein. Further, N. meningitidis accumulated in the thyroid gland, while thyroid hormone T4 levels decreased. Bacteria reached the mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tract, which required expression of the meningococcal PilC1 adhesin. Surprisingly, PilC1 was dispensable for meningococcal growth in blood and for crossing of the blood-brain barrier, indicating that the major role of PilC1 is to interact with mucosal surfaces. This in vivo study reveals disease dynamics and organ targeting during meningococcal disease and presents a potent tool for further investigations of meningococcal pathogenesis and vaccines in vivo. This might lead to development of new strategies to improve the outcome of meningococcal disease in human patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17311106
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9032
      1. Author :
        Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Kataoka, Ken; Abarzua, Fernando; Tanimoto, Ryuta; Watanabe, Masami; Murata, Hitoshi; Than, Swe Swe; Kurose, Kaoru; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Huh, Nam-ho
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of biological chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        284
      8. Issue :
        21
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenoviridae; Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Endoplasmic Reticulum; Fibroblasts; Humans; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins; Interferon Regulatory Factor-1; Interleukin-7; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 5; Mice; Neoplasms; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; PC-3M-luc; Signal Transduction; STAT1 Transcription Factor
      12. Abstract :
        We previously showed that the tumor suppressor gene REIC/Dkk-3, when overexpressed by an adenovirus (Ad-REIC), exhibited a dramatic therapeutic effect on human cancers through a mechanism triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress. Adenovirus vectors show no target cell specificity and thus may elicit unfavorable side effects through infection of normal cells even upon intra-tumoral injection. In this study, we examined possible effects of Ad-REIC on normal cells. We found that infection of normal human fibroblasts (NHF) did not cause apoptosis but induced production of interleukin (IL)-7. The induction was triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress and mediated through IRE1alpha, ASK1, p38, and IRF-1. When Ad-REIC-infected NHF were transplanted in a mixture with untreated human prostate cancer cells, the growth of the cancer cells was significantly suppressed. Injection of an IL-7 antibody partially abrogated the suppressive effect of Ad-REIC-infected NHF. These results indicate that Ad-REIC has another arm against human cancer, an indirect host-mediated effect because of overproduction of IL-7 by mis-targeted NHF, in addition to its direct effect on cancer cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19279003
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8948
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