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      1. Author :
        Hunter, John J.; Neben, Tamlyn Yee; Purchio, Tony; Jenkins, Darlene
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        AACR Meeting Abstracts
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2005
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells
      12. Abstract :
        Peritoneal dissemination is a common feature of human ovarian carcinoma. While this can be mimicked in preclinical models by intraperitoneal injection of human ovarian tumor cells into immunocompromised mice, the resulting tumor burden is difficult to monitor and quantify. Intraperitoneal tumor growth is typically evaluated indirectly by measured changes in mouse abdominal girth and body weight or, directly, by macroscopic and histological examination at the endpoint of the study. In order to establish a model system that allows continuous and accurate assessment of ovarian cancer growth and spread over time we transfected SKOV-3 cells with the firefly luciferase gene. The resulting cell line, SKOV3-luc-D3, expresses stable levels of luciferase in vitro and emits a strong luminescent signal when exposed to luciferin. Xenograft tumors established with this cell line can be tracked and quantified non-invasively by bioluminescent imaging using a highly sensitive, cooled CCD camera (IVIS(R) Imaging System, Xenogen Corp). In addition to providing a direct measure of primary tumor burden and growth, the SKOV3-luc-D3 cell line also allows for real-time evaluation of tumor response to various therapeutic agents, as well as enhanced detection of distal metastases.
      13. URL :
        http://www.aacrmeetingabstracts.org/cgi/content/abstract/2005/1/256-b
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9014
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E.; Hornig, Yvette S.; Oei, Yoko A.; Yu, Shang-Fan; Dusich, Joan M.; Jenkins, Darlene E.; Purchio, Tony; Hornig, Yvette S.; Oei, Yoko A.; Yu, Shang-Fan; Dusich, Joan M.; Purchio, Tony
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        AACR Meeting Abstracts
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2004
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; MCF-7-luc-F5 cells
      12. Abstract :
        A clonal human tumor cell line expressing firefly luciferase, MCF-7-luc-F5, was developed from parental MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells and characterized for bioluminescence in vitro and in vivo. As few as twenty cells were detectable in vitro and average bioluminescence measured approximately 680 photons/sec/cell. Tumorigenesis of MCF-7-luc-F5 cells was assessed with and without estrogen supplement in vivo following injection of cells into the mammary fat pad of nude-beige mice. Continuous tumor growth was observed by weekly bioluminescent imaging in mice receiving a slow release (60 day) estrogen pellet implant (0.36 mg/pellet), while no tumor growth occurred in mice without estrogen supplement. Caliper measurements of tumor volume indicated similar results. A kinetic analysis of luciferase activity in vivo demonstrated that peak signals were evident approximately 12-15 minutes after injection of luciferin substrate and were maintained at a relatively stable level for at least another 20-25 minutes. Spontaneous metastasis from the primary mammary fat pad tumor to thoracic and axillary regions was observed in vivo in 50% of the animals. Subsequent ex vivo images and histology identified metastatic sites in lung, rib, or lymph nodes depending on the mouse. Standard drug treatment on primary and secondary tumor growth was also monitored by bioluminescent imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.aacrmeetingabstracts.org/cgi/content/abstract/2004/1/1179-c
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9011
      1. Author :
        Neben, Tamlyn Yee; Clermont, Anne O.; Esposito, Lin; Oei, Yoko; Neben, Tamlyn Yee; Jenkins, Darlene E.; Clermont, Anne O.; Esposito, Lin; Oei, Yoko; Jenkins, Darlene E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        AACR Meeting Abstracts
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2005
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Lovo-6-luc-1 cells
      12. Abstract :
        Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States with an estimated 130,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Many cases are asymptomatic and not diagnosed until late stage of disease. Identification of primary tumors at an earlier stage is advantageous in treatment planning and aids in decreasing the morbidity/mortality rate from recurrence. The aim of our studies is to establish a xenograft system for monitoring tumor growth and metastasis in vivo which allows continual evaluation of drug and drug regimen efficacy at all stages of tumor progression. LoVo-6-luc-1, a luciferase expressing cell line derived from LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, was injected by various routes (subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intracecal) into female SCID-bg mice. Tumor growth and metastatic spread was monitored weekly by in vivo imaging using the Xenogen IVISTM imaging platform. Visible bioluminescence signals were detected immediately after injection and high tumor take was seen in all of the models. In the subcutaneous model, we found a high correlation between mean bioluminescence and mean tumor volume. In the intraperitoneal and ceacum injected models, the onset of tumor spread was rapid and ex vivo imaging confirmed metastasis to multiple organs such as liver, lung, kidney, adrenal gland, spleen and ovary.
      13. URL :
        http://www.aacrmeetingabstracts.org/cgi/content/abstract/2005/1/908-d
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9016
      1. Author :
        Razavi, Reza; Harrison, Lawrence E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgical oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carcinoma; Cell Proliferation; Colonic Neoplasms; DNA Damage; Drug Therapy, Combination; Female; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Hyperthermia, Induced; Injections, Intraperitoneal; Mice; Mice, Nude; Oxidants; Oxidative Stress; Survival Rate; tert-Butylhydroperoxide; Treatment Outcome; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to extend our in vitro observations that induced oxidative stress under hyperthermic conditions decreases tumor cell growth into a preclinical murine model of hyperthermic perfusion. METHODS A nude mouse model of colon cancer carcinomatosis with HT-29-Luc-D6 colon cancer cells was established, and tumor growth was measured by serial bioluminescent imaging. RESULTS By means of a survival model of hyperthermic perfusion, we demonstrated that perfusion with normothermic saline decreased tumor growth compared with no perfusion controls, and tumor growth was further decreased with hyperthermic perfusion alone. The induction of oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide in the perfusate at concentrations as high as 600 microM was well tolerated in this model of hyperthermic perfusion. Importantly, induced oxidative stress using hydrogen peroxide under hyperthermic conditions significantly decreased in vivo tumor cell growth compared with all other controls. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of our observations, thermal sensitization through modulation of cellular oxidative stress may represent a novel approach to increase the efficacy of hyperthermia as an anticancer modality.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19711132
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9008
      1. Author :
        Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Hasako, Shinichi; Nakatsuru, Yoko; Mita, Takashi; Ichikawa, Koji; Kodera, Tsutomu; Sakai, Takumi; Nambu, Tadahiro; Miyamoto, Mayu; Takahashi, Ikuko; Miki, Satomi; Kawanishi, Nobuhiko; Ohkubo, Mitsuru; Kotani, Hidehito; Iwasawa, Yoshikazu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids; HeLa-luc; Humans; Inhibitory Concentration 50; Mice; Mitosis; Protein kinase inhibitors; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; Rats; Taxoids; Thiazoles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Aurora-A kinase is a one of the key regulators during mitosis progression. Aurora-A kinase is a potential target for anticancer therapies because overexpression of Aurora-A, which is frequently observed in some human cancers, results in aberrant mitosis leading to chromosomal instability and possibly tumorigenesis. MK-5108 is a novel small molecule with potent inhibitory activity against Aurora-A kinase. Although most of the Aurora-kinase inhibitors target both Aurora-A and Aurora-B, MK-5108 specifically inhibited Aurora-A kinase in a panel of protein kinase assays. Inhibition of Aurora-A by MK-5108 in cultured cells induced cell cycle arrest at the G(2)-M phase in flow cytometry analysis. The effect was confirmed by the accumulation of cells with expression of phosphorylated Histone H3 and inhibition of Aurora-A autophosphorylation by immunostaining assays. MK-5108 also induced phosphorylated Histone H3 in skin and xenograft tumor tissues in a nude rat xenograft model. MK-5108 inhibited growth of human tumor cell lines in culture and in different xenograft models. Furthermore, the combination of MK-5108 and docetaxel showed enhanced antitumor activities compared with control and docetaxel alone-treated animals without exacerbating the adverse effects of docetaxel. MK-5108 is currently tested in clinical trials and offers a new therapeutic approach to combat human cancers as a single agent or in combination with existing taxane therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20053775
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9006
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        251
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abdominal Wall; Animals; Bioware; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Polypropylenes; Polytetrafluoroethylene; pXen-5; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Surgical Mesh; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE To study the influence of morphology of surgical meshes on the course of bacterial infection under the influence of the host immune system in an in vivo chronic bacterial infection model. BACKGROUND The use of prosthetic meshes has increased dramatically the last decades in abdominal wall reconstructive surgery. Whereas infection is becoming a more frequent complication, attention is increasingly drawn to the influence of the surgeon's mesh choice on the course of this complication. METHODS Samples of 6 often applied surgical meshes were contaminated with a bioluminescent strain of Staphylococcus aureus and implanted subcutaneously in an immunocompetent BALB/c mouse. The intensity and the spreading of bioluminescence (ie, p/s/cm/sr) were analyzed non-invasively in vivo during a 10-day follow-up period. RESULTS Over the course of infection, multifilament polypropylene and hydrophobic materials showed a significantly higher persistence of bacteria as well as spreading of infection compared to all other meshes. In contrast, infection resolved in almost all animals with a low-weight polyester mesh. CONCLUSION The results of this study are in accordance with circumstantial evidence from limited clinical reports on infection involving surgical meshes and suggest that multifilament and hydrophobic meshes significantly increase bacterial persistence or spreading in the infected area in contrast to monofilament polypropylene and lightweight meshes. Therefore, the surgeon should consider this outcome when choosing a mesh graft for limiting infection in abdominal wall repair.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19864938
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9017
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van der Mei, Henny C; Francis, Kevin P; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Dam, Gooitzen M
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        88
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bacterial Adhesion; Biofilms; Bioware; Chromosomes, Bacterial; Colony Count, Microbial; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Prostheses and Implants; pXen-5; Soft Tissue Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is the main cause of biomaterials-related failure. A simple technique to test in-vivo new antimicrobial and/or nonadhesive implant coatings is unavailable. Current in vitro methods for studying bacterial adhesion and growth on biomaterial surfaces lack the influence of the host immune system. Most in vivo methods to study biomaterials-related infections routinely involve implant-removal, preventing comprehensive longitudinal monitoring. In vivo imaging circumvents these drawbacks and is based on the use of noninvasive optical imaging of bioluminescent bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus Xen29 is genetically modified to be stably bioluminescent, by the introduction of a modified full lux operon onto its chromosome. Surgical meshes with adhering S. aureus Xen29 were implanted in mice and bacterial growth and spread into the surrounding tissue was monitored longitudinally from bioluminescence with a highly sensitive CCD camera. Distinct spatiotemporal bioluminescence patterns, extending beyond the mesh area into surrounding tissues were observed. After 10 days, the number of living organisms isolated from explanted meshes was found to correlate with bioluminescence prior to sacrifice of the animals. Therefore, it is concluded that in vivo imaging using bioluminescent bacteria is ideally suited to study antimicrobial coatings taking into account the host immune system. In addition, longitudinal monitoring of infection in one animal will significantly reduce the number of experiments and animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18618733
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9020
      1. Author :
        Schwan, William R; Lehmann, Lynn; McCormick, James
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        74
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral; Animals; Bacterial Proteins; Bioware; Blotting, Northern; Disease Models, Animal; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Humans; Lac Operon; Mice; Osmolar Concentration; Proline; pXen-5; Recombinant Fusion Proteins; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Symporters; Transcriptional Activation
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcus aureus can grow virtually anywhere in the human body but needs to import proline through low- and high-affinity proline transporters to survive. This study examined the regulation of the S. aureus putP gene, which encodes a high-affinity proline permease. putP::lacZ and putP::lux transcriptional fusions were constructed and integrated into the genomes of several S. aureus strains. Enzyme activity was measured after growth in media with various osmolyte concentrations. As osmolarity rose, putP expression increased, with a plateau at 2 M for NaCl in strain LL3-1. Proline concentrations as low as 17.4 muM activated expression of the putP gene. The putP::lux fusion was also integrated into the genomes of S. aureus strains that were either SigB inactive (LL3-1, 8325-4, and SH1003) or SigB active (Newman and SH1000). SigB inactive strains showed increased putP gene expression as NaCl concentrations rose, whereas SigB active strains displayed a dramatic decrease in putP expression, suggesting that the alternative sigma factor B plays a negative role in putP regulation. Mice inoculated with S. aureus strains containing the putP::lux fusion exhibited up to a 715-fold increase in putP expression, although levels in the various murine organs differed. Moreover, urine from human patients infected with S. aureus showed elevated putP levels by use of a PCR procedure, whereas blood and some abscess material had no significant increase. Thus, putP is transcriptionally activated by a low-proline and high osmotic environment both in growth media and in murine or human clinical specimens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16368996
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9023
      1. Author :
        Baddour, Ralph E; Dadani, Farhan N; Kolios, Michael C; Bisland, Stuart K
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biological physics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        33
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Ultrasound imaging is proving to be an important tool for medical diagnosis of dermatological disease. Backscatter spectral profiles using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS, 10-100 MHz) are sensitive to subtle changes in eukaryotic cellular morphology and mechanical properties that are indicative of early apoptosis, the main type of cell death induced following photodynamic therapy (PDT). We performed experiments to study whether HFUS could also be used to discern changes in bacteria following PDT treatment. Pellets of planktonic Staphylococcus aureus were treated with different PDT protocols and subsequently interrogated with HFUS. Changes in ultrasound backscatter response were found to correlate with antimicrobial effect. Despite their small size, distinct changes in bacterial morphology that are indicative of cell damage or death are detectable by altered backscatter spectra from bacterial ensembles using HFUS. This highlights the potential for HFUS in rapidly and non-invasively assessing the structural changes related to antimicrobial response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19669553
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9052
      1. Author :
        Bisland, Stuart K; Chien, Claudia; Wilson, Brian C; Burch, Shane
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aminolevulinic Acid; Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Cell Survival; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Female; Implants, Experimental; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Methylene Blue; Osteomyelitis; Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Osteomyelitis can lead to severe morbidity and even death resulting from an acute or chronic inflammation of the bone and contiguous structures due to fungal or bacterial infection. Incidence approximates 1 in 1000 neonates and 1 in 5000 children in the United States annually and increases up to 0.36% and 16% in adults with diabetes or sickle cell anaemia, respectively. Current regimens of treatment include antibiotics and/or surgery. However, the increasing number of antibiotic resistant pathogens suggests that alternate strategies are required. We are investigating photodynamic therapy (PDT) as one such alternate treatment for osteomyelitis using a bioluminescent strain of biofilm-producing staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) grown onto kirschner wires (K-wire). S. aureus-coated K-wires were exposed to methylene blue (MB) or 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT either in vitro or following implant into the tibial medullary cavity of Sprague-Dawley rats. The progression of S. aureus biofilm was monitored non-invasively using bioluminescence and expressed as a percentage of the signal for each sample immediately prior to treatment. S. aureus infections were subject to PDT 10 days post inoculation. Treatment comprised administration of ALA (300 mg kg(-1)) intraperitoneally followed 4 h later by light (635 +/- 10 nm; 75 J cm(-2)) delivered transcutaneously via an optical fiber placed onto the tibia and resulted in significant delay in bacterial growth. In vitro, MB and ALA displayed similar cell kill with > or =4 log(10) cell kill. In vivo, ALA-mediated PDT inhibited biofilm implants in bone. These results confirm that MB or ALA-mediated PDT have potential to treat S. aureus cultures grown in vitro or in vivo using an animal model of osteomyelitis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16395425
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9054
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