1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

271–280 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor
      2. Title :
        Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: A possible implication for atherogenesis
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Food Funct.
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 6049
      15. Serial :
        14630
      1. Author :
        Luker, G.D.; Luker, K.E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Clinical Medicine; Contrast Media; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescence; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; in vivo; in vivo imaging; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Optics and Photonics; Peptide Hydrolases; Rats; Signal Transduction; Software; Tomography, Optical
      12. Abstract :
        Optical techniques, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, are emerging as powerful new modalities for molecular imaging in disease and therapy. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, researchers have developed optical methods for imaging a variety of cellular and molecular processes in vivo, including protein interactions, protein degradation, and protease activity. Whereas optical imaging has been used primarily for research in small-animal models, there are several areas in which optical molecular imaging will translate to clinical medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in optical techniques for molecular imaging and the potential impact for clinical medicine.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18077528
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 7444
      15. Serial :
        4477
      1. Author :
        E.A. te Velde; Th. Veerman; V. Subramaniam; Th. Ruers
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European Journal of Cancer Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        36
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Fluorescent; Sentinel node; Probe; Resection; Oncology; Surgery
      12. Abstract :
        Aims and background: Improved visualization of surgical targets inside of the patient helps to improve radical resection of the tumor while sparing healthy surrounding tissue. In order to achieve an image, optical contrast must be generated by properties intrinsic to the tissue, or require the attachment of special visualization labels to the tumor. In this overview the current status of the clinical use of fluorescent dyes and probes are reviewed.

        Methods: In this review, all experimental and clinical studies concerning fluorescent imaging were included. In addition, in the search for the optimal fluorescent imaging modality, all characteristics of a fluorescent dye were described.

        Findings and conclusions: Although the technique of imaging through fluorescence sounds promising and several animal models show efficacy, official approval of these agents for further clinical evaluation, is eagerly awaited.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ejso.com/article/S0748-7983%2809%2900498-3/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4491
      1. Author :
        Elena S. Izmailova; Nancy Paz; Herlen Alencar; Miyoung Chun; Lisa Schopf; Michael Hepperle; Joan H. Lane; Geraldine Harriman; Yajun Xu; Timothy Ocain; Ralph Weissleder; Umar Mahmood; Aileen M. Healy; Bruce Jaffee
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        inflammation; immune response; rheumatoid arthritis; arthritis; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The NF-kappaB signaling pathway promotes the immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in rodent models of RA. NF-kappaB activity is regulated by the IKK-2 kinase during inflammatory responses. To elucidate how IKK-2 inhibition suppresses disease development, we used a combination of in vivo imaging, transcription profiling, and histopathology technologies to study mice with antibody-induced arthritis.

        METHODS: ML120B, a potent, small molecule inhibitor of IKK-2, was administered to arthritic animals, and disease activity was monitored. NF-kappaB activity in diseased joints was quantified by in vivo imaging. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate gene expression in joints. Protease-activated near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) in vivo imaging was applied to assess the amounts of active proteases in the joints.

        RESULTS: Oral administration of ML120B suppressed both clinical and histopathologic manifestations of disease. In vivo imaging demonstrated that NF-kappaB activity in inflamed arthritic paws was inhibited by ML120B, resulting in significant suppression of multiple genes in the NF-kappaB pathway, i.e., KC, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78, JE, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD3, CD68, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 3, cathepsin B, and cathepsin K. NIRF in vivo imaging demonstrated that ML120B treatment dramatically reduced the amount of active proteases in the joints.

        CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that IKK-2 inhibition in the murine model of antibody-induced arthritis suppresses both inflammation and joint destruction. In addition, this study highlights how gene expression profiling can facilitate the identification of surrogate biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in an experimental model of arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.22303/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4511
      1. Author :
        Rahul A. Sheth, Marco Maricevich and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Atherosclerosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        212
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        Molecular imaging; Abdominal aortic aneurysm; Optical imaging; Pre-clinical; Endovascular imaging; Matrix metalloproteinase; in vivo imaging; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Objectives: We present a method to quantify the inflammatory processes that drive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development that may help predict the rate of growth and thus guide medical and surgical management. We use an in vivo optical molecular imaging approach to quantify protease activity within the walls of AAAs in a rodent model.

        Methods: AAAs were generated in mice by topical application of calcium chloride, followed by the administration of the MMP inhibitor doxycycline for 3 months. After this time period, an enzyme-activatable optical molecular imaging agent sensitive to MMP activity was administered, and MMP proteolytic activity was measured in vivo. Histology and in situ zymography were performed for validation. AAAs were also generated in rats, and MMP activity within the walls of the AAAs was also quantified endovascularly.

        Results: A dose-dependent response of AAA growth rate to doxycycline administration was demonstrated, with high doses of the drug resulting in nearly complete suppression of aneurysm formation. There was a direct relationship between the rate of aneurysmal growth and measured MMP activity, with a linear best-fit well approximating the relationship. We additionally performed endovascular imaging of AAAs in rats and demonstrated a similar suppression of intramural MMP activity following doxycycline administration.

        Conclusions: We present an in vivo evaluation of MMP activity within the walls of AAAs in rodents and show a direct, linear relationship between proteolytic activity and aneurysmal growth. We also illustrate that this functional imaging method can be performed endovascularly, demonstrating potential pre-clinical and clinical applications.
      13. URL :
        http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(10)00390-4/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4550
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        26
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        Cardiovascular disease; Atherosclerosis; Vulnerable plaque; Spectroscopy; Intravascular; in vivo imaging; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Many apparent healthy persons die from cardiovascular disease, despite major advances in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are able to predict cardiovascular events in the long run, but fail to assess current disease activity or nearby cardiovascular events. There is a clear relation between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and the presence of so-called vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques are characterized by active inflammation, a thin cap and a large lipid pool. Spectroscopy is an optical imaging technique which depicts the interaction between light and tissues, and thereby shows the biochemical composition of tissues. In recent years, impressive advances have been made in spectroscopy technology and intravascular spectroscopy is able to assess the composition of plaques of interest and thereby to identify and actually quantify plaque vulnerability. This review summarizes the current evidence for spectroscopy as a measure of plaque vulnerability and discusses the potential role of intravascular spectroscopic imaging techniques.
      13. URL :
        http://www.springerlink.com/content/kx38073782g98666/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4552
      1. Author :
        Marcella A. Calfon, Claudio Vinegoni, Vasilis Ntziachristos and Farouc A. Jaffer
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Biomedical Optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; Cat K FAST; Cat B FAST; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.
      13. URL :
        http://spiedl.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=JBOPFO000015000001011107000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes&ref=no
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4556
      1. Author :
        Ackermann, M.; Carvajal, I.M.; Morse, B.A.; Moreta, M.; O'Neil, S.; Kossodo, S.; Peterson, J.D.; Delventhal, V.; Marsh, H.N.; Furfine, E.S.; Konerding, M.A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        International Journal of Oncology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense 680; anti-angiogenic; anti-tumorigenic; Cancer; FMT1 (VisEn); FMT-Solaris; In vivo imaging (VisEn); intraperitoneal injection; mice
      12. Abstract :
        Antiangiogenesis has become a promising pillar in modern cancer therapy. This study investigates the antiangiogenic effects of the PEGylated Adnectin[TM], CT-322, in a murine Colo-205 xenograft tumor model. CT-322 specifically binds to and blocks vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2). Adnectins are a novel class of targeted biologics engineered from the 10th domain of human fibronectin. CT-322 treated tumors exhibited a significant reduction in tumor growth of 69%, a 2.8 times lower tumor surface area and fewer necrotic areas. Control tumors showed a 2.36-fold higher microvessel density (MVD) and a 2.42 times higher vessel volume in corrosion casts. The vascular architecture in CT-322-treated tumors was characterized by a strong normalization of vasculature. This was quantified in corrosion casts of CT-322 treated tumors in which the intervascular distance (a reciprocal parameter indicative of vessel density) and the distance between two consecutive branchings were assessed, with these distances being 2.21 times and 2.37 times greater than in controls, respectively. Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) equally affirmed the inhibitory effects of CT-322 on tumor vasculature as indicated by a 60% reduction of the vascular probe, AngioSense, accumulating in tumor tissue, as a measurement of vascular permeability. Moreover, AngioSense accumulation was reduced as early as 24 h after starting treatment. The sum of these effects on tumor vasculature illustrates the anti-angiogenic mechanism underlying the antitumor activity of CT-322 and provides support for further evaluation of this Adnectin in combinatorial strategies with standard of care therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21109927
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8449
      15. Serial :
        4804
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All