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      1. Author :
        Lu, Z.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Kurup, D. B.; Tegos, G. P.; Jahnke, A.; Wharton, T.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Nanomedicine (Lond)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen44, Xen 44, Proteus mirabilis, bioluminescence imaging, Animals; Fullerenes/*chemistry; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Photochemotherapy/*methods; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemistry; Pseudomonas Infections/*drug therapy; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects; Wound Infection/*drug therapy
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: Fullerenes are under intensive study for potential biomedical applications. We have previously reported that a C60 fullerene functionalized with three dimethylpyrrolidinium groups (BF6) is a highly active broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer in vitro when combined with white-light illumination. We asked whether this high degree of in vitro activity would translate into an in vivo therapeutic effect in two potentially lethal mouse models of infected wounds. MATERIALS & METHODS: We used stable bioluminescent bacteria and a low light imaging system to follow the progress of the infection noninvasively in real time. An excisional wound on the mouse back was contaminated with one of two bioluminescent Gram-negative species, Proteus mirabilis (2.5 x 10(7) cells) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(6) cells). A solution of BF6 was placed into the wound followed by delivery of up to 180 J/cm(2) of broadband white light (400-700 nm). RESULTS: In both cases there was a light-dose-dependent reduction of bioluminescence from the wound not observed in control groups (light alone or BF6 alone). Fullerene-mediated photodynamic therapy of mice infected with P. mirabilis led to 82% survival compared with 8% survival without treatment (p < 0.001). Photodynamic therapy of mice infected with highly virulent P. aeruginosa did not lead to survival, but when photodynamic therapy was combined with a suboptimal dose of the antibiotic tobramycin (6 mg/kg for 1 day) there was a synergistic therapeutic effect with a survival of 60% compared with a survival of 20% with tobramycin alone (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that cationic fullerenes have clinical potential as an antimicrobial photosensitizer for superficial infections where red light is not needed to penetrate tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21143031
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10563
      1. Author :
        Lorentzen, D.; Durairaj, L.; Pezzulo, A. A.; Nakano, Y.; Launspach, J.; Stoltz, D. A.; Zamba, G.; McCray, P. B., Jr.; Zabner, J.; Welsh, M. J.; Nauseef, W. M.; Banfi, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Free Radic Biol Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A recently discovered enzyme system produces antibacterial hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the airway lumen by oxidizing the secreted precursor thiocyanate (SCN(-)). Airway epithelial cultures have been shown to secrete SCN(-) in a CFTR-dependent manner. Thus, reduced SCN(-) availability in the airway might contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene and characterized by an airway host defense defect. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the SCN(-) concentration in the nasal airway surface liquid (ASL) of CF patients and non-CF subjects and in the tracheobronchial ASL of CFTR-DeltaF508 homozygous pigs and control littermates. In the nasal ASL, the SCN(-) concentration was ~30-fold higher than in serum independent of the CFTR mutation status of the human subject. In the tracheobronchial ASL of CF pigs, the SCN(-) concentration was somewhat reduced. Among human subjects, SCN(-) concentrations in the ASL varied from person to person independent of CFTR expression, and CF patients with high SCN(-) levels had better lung function than those with low SCN(-) levels. Thus, although CFTR can contribute to SCN(-) transport, it is not indispensable for the high SCN(-) concentration in ASL. The correlation between lung function and SCN(-) concentration in CF patients may reflect a beneficial role for SCN(-).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21334431
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10564
      1. Author :
        Yipp, B. G.; Petri, B.; Salina, D.; Jenne, C. N.; Scott, B. N.; Zbytnuik, L. D.; Pittman, K.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Wu, K.; Meijndert, H. C.; Malawista, S. E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, A.; Zhang, K.; Conly, J.; Kubes, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging, Analysis of Variance; Animals; Extracellular Space/*metabolism; Genetic Vectors/genetics; Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Movement/*physiology; Neutrophils/*immunology/metabolism/physiology; Opsonin Proteins/metabolism; Skin Diseases, Bacterial/*immunology/metabolism; Toll-Like Receptor 2/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released as neutrophils die in vitro in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap that invasive microbes may exploit. Neutrophils capable of migration and phagocytosis while undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented systemic bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling, thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMNs developed diffuse decondensed nuclei, ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei showed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A requirement for both Toll-like receptor 2 and complement-mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally, live human PMNs injected into mouse skin developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo, and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection NETosis involves neutrophils that do not undergo lysis and retain the ability to multitask.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22922410
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10565
      1. Author :
        Goldberg, M. S.; Xing, D.; Ren, Y.; Orsulic, S.; Bhatia, S. N.; Sharp, P. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; BRCA1 Protein/*genetics; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Humans; Mice; Nanoparticles/*chemistry; Nanotechnology/methods; Neoplasm Transplantation; Ovarian Neoplasms/*genetics/*therapy; Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/*genetics; RNA Interference; RNA, Small Interfering/*metabolism; Treatment Outcome
      12. Abstract :
        Inhibition of the DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) with small molecules has been shown to be an effective treatment for ovarian cancer with BRCA mutations. Here, we report the in vivo administration of siRNA to Parp1 in mouse models of ovarian cancer. A unique member of the lipid-like materials known as lipidoids is shown to deliver siRNA to disseminated murine ovarian carcinoma allograft tumors following intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. siParp1 inhibits cell growth, primarily by induction of apoptosis, in Brca1-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, the treatment extends the survival of mice bearing tumors derived from Brca1-deficient ovarian cancer cells but not from Brca1 wild-type cells, confirming the proposed mechanism of synthetic lethality. Because there are 17 members of the Parp family, the inherent complementarity of RNA affords a high level of specificity for therapeutically addressing Parp1 in the context of impaired homologous recombination.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21187397
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10566
      1. Author :
        Kwong, G. A.; von Maltzahn, G.; Murugappan, G.; Abudayyeh, O.; Mo, S.; Papayannopoulos, I. A.; Sverdlov, D. Y.; Liu, S. B.; Warren, A. D.; Popov, Y.; Schuppan, D.; Bhatia, S. N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Biotechnol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of complex diseases, yet our ability to discover new biomarkers remains limited by our dependence on endogenous molecules. Here we describe the development of exogenously administered 'synthetic biomarkers' composed of mass-encoded peptides conjugated to nanoparticles that leverage intrinsic features of human disease and physiology for noninvasive urinary monitoring. These protease-sensitive agents perform three functions in vivo: they target sites of disease, sample dysregulated protease activities and emit mass-encoded reporters into host urine for multiplexed detection by mass spectrometry. Using mouse models of liver fibrosis and cancer, we show that these agents can noninvasively monitor liver fibrosis and resolution without the need for invasive core biopsies and substantially improve early detection of cancer compared with current clinically used blood biomarkers. This approach of engineering synthetic biomarkers for multiplexed urinary monitoring should be broadly amenable to additional pathophysiological processes and point-of-care diagnostics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242163
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10567
      1. Author :
        Tafreshi, N. K.; Bui, M. M.; Bishop, K.; Lloyd, M. C.; Enkemann, S. A.; Lopez, A. S.; Abrahams, D.; Carter, B. W.; Vagner, J.; Grobmyer, S. R.; Gillies, R. J.; Morse, D. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Clin Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*diagnostic use/immunology/pharmacokinetics; Antigens, Neoplasm/*metabolism; Blotting, Western; Breast/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carbonic Anhydrases/*metabolism; Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/*diagnosis/immunology/metabolism; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescent Antibody Technique; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Luciferases/metabolism; Luminescent Measurements; Lymphatic Metastasis; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; RNA, Messenger/genetics; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tissue Array Analysis; Tissue Distribution; Tumor Cells, Cultured; Tumor Markers, Biological/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the noninvasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis, and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX- and CAXII-specific monoclonal antibodies to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. RESULTS: Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice-bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker-expressing cells and nonexpressing cells or by preinjection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of lymph node metastases showed that peritumorally injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX- and CAXII-expressing cells into the axillary lymph nodes. CONCLUSION: These imaging probes have potential for noninvasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22016510
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10568
      1. Author :
        Vujanovic, L.; Ballard, W.; Thorne, S. H.; Vujanovic, N. L.; Butterfield, L. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncoimmunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Recombinant adenovirus-engineered dendritic cells (Ad.DC) are potent vaccines for induction of anti-viral and anti-cancer T cell immunity. The effectiveness of Ad.DC vaccines may depend on the newly described ability of Ad.DC to crosstalk with natural killer (NK) cells via cell-to-cell contact, and to mediate activation, polarization and bridging of innate and adaptive immunity. For this interaction to occur in vivo, Ad.DC must be able to attract NK cells from surrounding tissues or peripheral blood. We developed a novel live mouse imaging system-based NK-cell migration test, and demonstrated for the first time that human Ad.DC induced directional migration of human NK cells across subcutaneous tissues, indicating that Ad.DC-NK cell contact and interaction could occur in vivo. We examined the mechanism of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Ad.DC produced multiple chemokines previously reported to recruit NK cells, including immunoregulatory CXCL10/IP-10 and proinflammatory CXCL8/IL-8. In vitro chemotaxis experiments utilizing neutralizing antibodies and recombinant human chemokines showed that CXCL10/IP-10 and CXCL8/IL-8 were critical for Ad.DC-mediated recruitment of CD56(hi)CD16(-) and CD56(lo)CD16(+) NK cells, respectively. The importance of CXCL8/IL-8 was further demonstrated in vivo. Pretreatment of mice with the neutralizing anti-CXCL8/IL-8 antibody led to significant inhibition of Ad.DC-induced migration of NK cells in vivo. These data show that Ad.DC can recruit spatially distant NK cells toward a vaccine site via specific chemokines. Therefore, an Ad.DC vaccine can likely induce interaction with endogenous NK cells via transmembrane mediators, and consequently mediate Th1 polarization and amplification of immune functions in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22754763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10570
      1. Author :
        Lin, S. A.; Patel, M.; Suresch, D.; Connolly, B.; Bao, B.; Groves, K.; Rajopadhye, M.; Peterson, J. D.; Klimas, M.; Sur, C.; Bednar, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Mol Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2012
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        189254
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        FMT, Prosense, CatB, Cathepsin B, fluorescence imaing, tomography, microCT
      12. Abstract :
        Inflammation as a core pathological event of atherosclerotic lesions is associated with the secretion of cathepsin proteases and the expression of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin. We employed fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) noninvasive imaging of these molecular activities using cathepsin sensing (ProSense, CatB FAST) and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin (IntegriSense) near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) agents. A statistically significant increase in the ProSense and IntegriSense signal was observed within the chest region of apoE(-/-) mice (P < 0.05) versus C57BL/6 mice starting 25 and 22 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. In a treatment study using ezetimibe (7 mg/kg), there was a statistically significant reduction in the ProSense and CatB FAST chest signal of treated (P < 0.05) versus untreated apoE(-/-) mice at 31 and 21 weeks on high cholesterol diet, respectively. The signal of ProSense and CatB FAST correlated with macrophage counts and was found associated with inflammatory cells by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry of cells dissociated from aortas. This report demonstrates that cathepsin and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin NIRF agents can be used as molecular imaging biomarkers for longitudinal detection of atherosclerosis, and cathepsin agents can monitor anti-inflammatory effects of ezetimibe with applications in preclinical testing of therapeutics and potentially for early diagnosis of atherosclerosis in patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23119157
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10571
      1. Author :
        Zhang, J.; Preda, D. V.; Vasquez, K. O.; Morin, J.; Delaney, J.; Bao, B.; Percival, M. D.; Xu, D.; McKay, D.; Klimas, M.; Bednar, B.; Sur, C.; Gao, D. Z.; Madden, K.; Yared, W.; Rajopadhye, M.; Peterson, J. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Am J Physiol Renal Physiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        303
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        F593-603
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ReninSense 680 FAST, FMT, Animal Feed/analysis; Animals; Cathepsin D; Cathepsin G; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/*pharmacology; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Peptides/*pharmacology; Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism; Rats; Renin/*blood/*metabolism; Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium, Dietary
      12. Abstract :
        The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is well studied for its regulation of blood pressure and fluid homeostasis, as well as for increased activity associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and kidney disease. The enzyme renin cleaves angiotensinogen to form angiotensin I (ANG I), which is further cleaved by angiotensin-converting enzyme to produce ANG II. Although ANG II is the main effector molecule of the RAS, renin is the rate-limiting enzyme, thus playing a pivotal role in regulating RAS activity in hypertension and organ injury processes. Our objective was to develop a near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) renin-imaging agent for noninvasive in vivo detection of renin activity as a measure of tissue RAS and in vitro plasma renin activity. We synthesized a renin-activatable agent, ReninSense 680 FAST (ReninSense), using a NIRF-quenched substrate derived from angiotensinogen that is cleaved specifically by purified mouse and rat renin enzymes to generate a fluorescent signal. This agent was assessed in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo to detect and quantify increases in plasma and kidney renin activity in sodium-sensitive inbred C57BL/6 mice maintained on a low dietary sodium and diuretic regimen. Noninvasive in vivo fluorescence molecular tomographic imaging of the ReninSense signal in the kidney detected increased renin activity in the kidneys of hyperreninemic C57BL/6 mice. The agent also effectively detected renin activity in ex vivo kidneys, kidney tissue sections, and plasma samples. This approach could provide a new tool for assessing disorders linked to altered tissue and plasma renin activity and to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic treatments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22674025
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10572
      1. Author :
        Yamaoka, Ippei; Kikuchi, Takeshi; Endo, Naoyuki; Ebisu, Goro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2014
      5. Publication :
        BMC gastroenterology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        BALB/c CrSlc mice; enteral nutrition; Ex vivo; Gastrosense 750; Hine® E-gel; in vivo; IVIS® Spectrum; Nev11121; pectin
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Semi-solidification by gelation or increased viscosity could slow the influx of liquid enteral nutrition (EN) into the small intestine. A liquid EN formula containing pectin that gels under acidic conditions such as those found in the stomach has been developed. A new near-infrared fluorescent imaging reagent was used to non-invasively acquire real time images of gastric emptying in a murine model in vivo. We postulated that the EN formula delays gastric emptying and tested this hypothesis using imaging in vivo.
        METHODS: Male BALB/c mice were given an oral bolus injection of a liquid EN containing the fluorescence reagent GastroSense750 with or without pectin. The EN in the stomach was visualized in vivo at various intervals using a non-invasive live imaging system and fluorescent signals were monitored from the stomach, which was removed at 60 min after EN ingestion.
        RESULTS: The fluorescence intensity of signals in stomachs in vivo and in resected stomachs was lower and attenuated over time in mice given EN without, than with pectin.
        CONCLUSIONS: Adding a gelling agent such as pectin delayed the transit of liquid EN from the stomach. Fluorescence imaging can visualize the delayed gastric emptying of EN containing pectin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25263497
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        11641
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