1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

421–430 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

  •  
  • Records
      1. Author :
        Inglefield, Jon R; Dumitru, Calin Dan; Alkan, Sefik S; Gibson, Sheila J; Lipson, Kenneth E; Tomai, Mark A; Larson, Chris J; Vasilakos, John P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of interferon & cytokine research: the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aminoquinolines; Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Culture Media, Conditioned; dendritic cells; Humans; Interferon Type I; Leukocytes, Mononuclear; Lung; Melanoma; Mice; Neoplasms; Oligodeoxyribonucleotides; Quinolines; Subcellular Fractions; Sulfonamides; Toll-Like Receptor 7
      12. Abstract :
        Antitumor effects of the toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist, 852A, were evaluated. Supernatants from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with 852A inhibited the proliferation of tumor cell lines Hs294T and 769-P but had no effect on others (786-O and Caki-1). Because addition of 852A directly to the Hs294T cells did not inhibit their proliferation, the mechanism(s) of inhibition of tumor cell proliferation was investigated. Low nanomolar concentrations of 852A stimulated the production of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) from human PBMCs. Cytokines stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of 852A were sufficient to inhibit Hs294T proliferation. At higher concentrations (3-30 microM), 852A induced the production of IL-12p70, IL-18, and IFN-gamma. PBMC cultures depleted of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) did not produce IFN-alpha, and their conditioned medium did not inhibit Hs294T proliferation. Anti-IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) and anti-IFN-alpha antibodies partially abrogated Hs294T proliferation inhibition by 852A-stimulated PBMC supernatants, whereas separate neutralization of TRAIL, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IFN-beta, or IFN-omega had no effect. In vivo, six doses of 852A administration significantly delayed the onset of lung colonies in a B16 melanoma model. Thus, the results demonstrate that the TLR7 agonist 852A inhibits in vitro proliferation of some tumor cells in a pDC-dependent and IFN-alpha-dependent manner and can delay tumor growth in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18439103
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9001
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adoptive Transfer; Animals; Antigen Presentation; Autoantigens; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cancer Vaccines; dendritic cells; Endosomes; Lymphocyte Activation; Lymphoma; Mice; Mice, Knockout; T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory; Vaccination
      12. Abstract :
        Lymphoma cells are malignant cells of the T- or B-cell lineage that often express many surface markers inappropriately, yet are not recognized as abnormal by the immune system. We modeled this situation by inoculating ovalbumin-expressing E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells into mice that expressed ovalbumin as a self antigen in pancreatic islets, and investigated the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in these mice. Although vaccination with DC-expressing ovalbumin induced strong cytotoxic T-cell immunity, which led to clearance of E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells in naive C57BL/6 mice, DC vaccination was ineffective in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. Antigen modification to increase its processing via the endosomal processing pathway dramatically increased CD4 T-cell activation but paradoxically, impaired the protective effect of DC vaccination even in naive mice. Depletion of CD25(+) T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]) prior to vaccination restored the efficacy of DC vaccination and allowed eradication of lymphoma also in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. We conclude that lymphoma cells may be eradicated using DC vaccination if activation of CD25(+) Tregs is simultaneously inhibited, and that intentionally enhanced endosomal antigen processing in DC vaccines may shift the balance from CD4 T-cell help toward stimulation of Tregs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621963
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9002
      1. Author :
        Xing, Yifei; Lu, Xiaochun; Pua, Eric C; Zhong, Pei
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Biochemical and biophysical research communications
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        375
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic; Female; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplasm Metastasis; Ultrasonic Therapy
      12. Abstract :
        This study aims to assess the risk of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy on the incidence of distant metastases and to investigate its association with HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immunity in a murine melanoma (B16-F10) model. Tumor-bearing legs were amputated immediately after or 2 days following HIFU treatment to differentiate the contribution of the elicited anti-tumor immunity. In mice undergoing amputation immediately after mechanical, thermal, or no HIFU treatment, metastasis rates were comparable (18.8%, 13.3%, and 12.5%). In contrast, with a 2-day delay in amputation, the corresponding metastasis rates were 6.7%, 11.8%, and 40%, respectively. Animal survival rate was higher and CTL activity was enhanced in the HIFU treatment groups. Altogether, our results suggest that HIFU treatment does not increase the risk of distant metastasis. Instead, HIFU treatment can elicit an anti-tumor immune response that may be harnessed to improve the overall effectiveness and quality of cancer therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18727919
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8998
      1. Author :
        Tai, Chien-Hsuan; Hsiung, Suz-Kai; Chen, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Mei-Lin; Lee, Gwo-Bin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Biomedical microdevices
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8 cells; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Nucleus; Cell Separation; Electrophoresis; Humans; Microfluidic Analytical Techniques
      12. Abstract :
        This study reports a new biochip capable of cell separation and nucleus collection utilizing dielectrophoresis (DEP) forces in a microfluidic system comprising of micropumps and microvalves, operating in an automatic format. DEP forces operated at a low voltage (15 Vp-p) and at a specific frequency (16 MHz) can be used to separate cells in a continuous flow, which can be subsequently collected. In order to transport the cell samples continuously, a serpentine-shape (S-shape) pneumatic micropump device was constructed onto the chip device to drive the samples flow through the microchannel, which was activated by the pressurized air injection. The mixed cell samples were first injected into an inlet reservoir and driven through the DEP electrodes to separate specific samples. Finally, separated cell samples were collected individually in two outlet reservoirs controlled by microvalves. With the same operation principle, the nucleus of the specific cells can be collected after the cell lysis procedure. The pumping rate of the micropump was measured to be 39.8 microl/min at a pressure of 25 psi and a driving frequency of 28 Hz. For the cell separation process, the initial flow rate was 3 microl/min provided by the micropump. A throughput of 240 cells/min can be obtained by using the developed device. The DEP electrode array, microchannels, micropumps and microvalves are integrated on a microfluidic chip using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technology to perform several crucial procedures including cell transportation, separation and collection. The dimensions of the integrated chip device were measured to be 6x7 cm. By integrating an S-shape pump and pneumatic microvalves, different cells are automatically transported in the microchannel, separated by the DEP forces, and finally sorted to specific chambers. Experimental data show that viable and non-viable cells (human lung cancer cell, A549-luc-C8) can be successfully separated and collected using the developed microfluidic platform. The separation accuracy, depending on the DEP operating mode used, of the viable and non-viable cells are measured to be 84 and 81%, respectively. In addition, after cell lysis, the nucleus can be also collected using a similar scheme. The developed automatic microfluidic platform is useful for extracting nuclear proteins from living cells. The extracted nuclear proteins are ready for nuclear binding assays or the study of nuclear proteins.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17508288
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9005
      1. Author :
        Ghali, Shadi; Bhatt, Kirit A; Dempsey, Marlese P; Jones, Deidre M; Singh, Sunil; Aarabi, Shahram; Arabi, Shahram; Butler, Peter E; Gallo, Robert L; Gurtner, Geoffrey C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Plastic and reconstructive surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        123
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; Bioware; Cathelicidins; Chronic Disease; Drug Carriers; Genetic Engineering; Male; Rats; Rats, Inbred F344; Surgical Flaps; Wound Infection; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The success of antimicrobial therapy has been impaired by the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. Antimicrobial peptides are ubiquitous proteins that are part of the innate immune system and are successful against such antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The authors have previously demonstrated the feasibility of protein delivery via microvascular free flap gene therapy and here they examine this approach for recalcitrant infections. METHODS The authors investigated the production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide-LL37, delivered by ex vivo transduction of the rodent superficial inferior epigastric free flap with Ad/CMV-LL37. The vascular permeabilizing agent vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was co-administered during ex vivo transduction with adenoviral vectors in an attempt to augment transduction efficiency. A rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infection seeded with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus was used to assess the biological efficacy of delivering therapeutic antimicrobial genes using this technology. RESULTS The authors were successful in demonstrating significant LL37 expression, which persisted for 14 days after ex vivo transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37. Transduction efficiency was significantly improved with the co-administration of 5 micrograms of VEGF during transduction without significantly increasing systemic dissemination of adenovirus or systemic toxicity. They were able to demonstrate in the rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infections a significant reduction in bacterial loads from infected catheters following transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37 and increased bacterial clearance. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates for the first time that microbicidal gene therapy via microvascular free flaps is able to clear chronic infections such as occurs with osteomyelitis resulting from trauma or an infected foreign body [corrected]
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19337084
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9040
      1. Author :
        Yu, Jun; Wu, Jenny; Francis, Kevin P; Purchio, Tony F; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Biofilms; Bioware; Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Mice; Mutation; Rifampin; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES To investigate in vivo fitness of rifampicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus mutants in a mouse biofilm model using bioluminescence imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS S. aureus was engineered with a luciferase operon to emit bioluminescence that can be detected in vivo using an IVIS imaging system. Two rifampicin-resistant strains of S. aureus that were previously isolated from animals undergoing rifampicin treatment, S464P (resistant to low concentrations of rifampicin) and H481Y (resistant to high concentrations of rifampicin), were characterized and then compared with their parental strain for in vivo fitness to form biofilm infections in the absence of rifampicin. RESULTS The mutant S464P showed better adaptation to in vivo growth than either the parental strain or H481Y without selective pressure. Six days after implanting pre-colonized catheters, bioluminescent signals were seen from 100% of the catheters coated by the mutant S464P. In comparison, only 83% and 61% of the catheters coated by the parental strain and H481Y, respectively, maintained a signal in vivo. Rifampicin treatment of S464P biofilms in vivo resulted in a slight decline, but earlier rebound in bioluminescence from these catheters compared with the parental signal, whereas rifampicin had no affect on bioluminescence in mice infected with mutant H481Y. CONCLUSIONS The mutant with low-level rifampicin resistance appears to be better adapted to in vivo growth than the mutant that has high-level rifampicin resistance. Moreover, the former mutant may actually have a slight competitive advantage over the rifampicin-susceptible strain (parental), raising awareness for the occurrence of such strains in clinical environments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15743898
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9055
      1. Author :
        Kuklin, Nelly A; Clark, Desmond J; Secore, Susan; Cook, James; Cope, Leslie D; McNeely, Tessie; Noble, Liliane; Brown, Martha J; Zorman, Julie K; Wang, Xin Min; Pancari, Gregory; Fan, Hongxia; Isett, Kevin; Burgess, Bruce; Bryan, Janine; Brownlow, Michelle; George, Hugh; Meinz, Maria; Liddell, Mary E; Kelly, Rosemarie; Schultz, Loren; Montgomery, Donna; Onishi, Janet; Losada, Maria; Martin, Melissa; Ebert, Timothy; Tan, Charles Y; Schofield, Timothy L; Nagy, Eszter; Meineke, Andreas; Joyce, Joseph G; Kurtz, Myra B; Caulfield, Michael J; Jansen, Kathrin U; McClements, William; Anderson, Annaliesa S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        74
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibodies, Bacterial; Antigens, Bacterial; Bioware; Cation Transport Proteins; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Macaca mulatta; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Inbred ICR; Sepsis; Sequence Homology, Amino Acid; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Survival Rate; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, and the rate of resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics, such as methicillin, is increasing; furthermore, there has been an increase in the number of methicillin-resistant S. aureus community-acquired infections. Effective treatment and prevention strategies are urgently needed. We investigated the potential of the S. aureus surface protein iron surface determinant B (IsdB) as a prophylactic vaccine against S. aureus infection. IsdB is an iron-sequestering protein that is conserved in diverse S. aureus clinical isolates, both methicillin resistant and methicillin sensitive, and it is expressed on the surface of all isolates tested. The vaccine was highly immunogenic in mice when it was formulated with amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant, and the resulting antibody responses were associated with reproducible and significant protection in animal models of infection. The specificity of the protective immune responses in mice was demonstrated by using an S. aureus strain deficient for IsdB and HarA, a protein with a high level of identity to IsdB. We also demonstrated that IsdB is highly immunogenic in rhesus macaques, inducing a more-than-fivefold increase in antibody titers after a single immunization. Based on the data presented here, IsdB has excellent prospects for use as a vaccine against S. aureus disease in humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16552052
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9989
      1. Author :
        Jan Grimm; David G. Kirsch; Stephen D. Windsor; Carla F. Bender Kim; Philip M. Santiago; Vasilis Ntziachristos; Tyler Jacks; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        PNAS
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        102
      8. Issue :
        40
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        gene expression profiling; lung cancer; immunohistochemistry; Western blotting; in vivo imaging; moleuclar imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        Using gene expression profiling, we identified cathepsin cysteine proteases as highly up-regulated genes in a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Overexpression of cathepsin proteases in these lung tumors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Therefore, an optical probe activated by cathepsin proteases was selected to detect murine lung tumors in vivo as small as 1 mm in diameter and spatially separated. We generated 3D maps of the fluorescence signal and fused them with anatomical computed tomography images to show a close correlation between fluorescence signal and tumor burden. By serially imaging the same mouse, optical imaging was used to follow tumor progression. This study demonstrates the capability for molecular imaging of a primary lung tumor by using endogenous proteases expressed by a tumor. It also highlights the feasibility of using gene expression profiling to identify molecular targets for imaging lung cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1242291/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4524
      1. Author :
        Woelfle, Mark A; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl Hirschie
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        104
      8. Issue :
        47
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Circadian Rhythm; Cyanobacteria; DNA, Bacterial; DNA, Superhelical; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Light; Plasmids; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-13; Transcription, Genetic
      12. Abstract :
        The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus expresses robust circadian (daily) rhythms under the control of the KaiABC-based core clockwork. Unlike eukaryotic circadian systems characterized thus far, the cyanobacterial clockwork modulates gene expression patterns globally and specific clock gene promoters are not necessary in mediating the circadian feedback loop. The oscilloid model postulates that global rhythms of transcription are based on rhythmic changes in the status of the cyanobacterial chromosome that are ultimately controlled by the KaiABC oscillator. By using a nonessential, cryptic plasmid (pANS) as a reporter of the superhelical state of DNA in cyanobacteria, we show that the supercoiling status of this plasmid changes in a circadian manner in vivo. The rhythm of topological change in the plasmid is conditional; this change is rhythmic in constant light and in light/dark cycles, but not in constant darkness. In further support of the oscilloid model, cyanobacterial promoters that are removed from their native chromosomal locations and placed on a plasmid preserve their circadian expression patterns.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18000054
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9031
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All