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      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacterial Proteins; Biofilms; Bioware; Catheterization, Central Venous; Male; Mice; Point Mutation; Sigma Factor; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Virulence; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The impact of the alternative sigma factor sigma B (SigB) on pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus is not conclusively clarified. In this study, a central venous catheter (CVC) related model of multiorgan infection was used to investigate the role of SigB for the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections and biofilm formation in vivo. Analysis of two SigB-positive wild-type strains and their isogenic mutants revealed uniformly that the wild-type was significantly more virulent than the SigB-deficient mutant. The observed difference in virulence was apparently not linked to the capability of the strains to form biofilms in vivo since wild-type and mutant strains were able to produce biofilm layers inside of the catheter. The data strongly indicate that the alternative sigma factor SigB plays a role in CVC-associated infections caused by S. aureus.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18328762
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9046
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Acta biomaterialia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bacterial Adhesion; Biocompatible Materials; Biofilms; Bioware; Coated Materials, Biocompatible; Materials Testing; Polyethylene Glycols; Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus epidermidis; Surface Properties; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings are known to reduce microbial adhesion in terms of numbers and binding strength. However, bacterial adhesion remains of the order of 10(4)cm(-2). It is unknown whether this density of bacteria will eventually grow into a biofilm. This study investigates the kinetics of staphylococcal biofilm formation on a commercially produced, robust, cross-linked PEG-based polymer coating (OptiChem) in vitro and in vivo. OptiChem inhibits biofilm formation in vitro, and although adsorption of plasma proteins encourages biofilm formation, microbial growth kinetics are still strongly delayed compared to uncoated glass. In vivo, OptiChem-coated and bare silicone rubber samples were inserted into an infected murine subcutaneous pocket model. In contrast to bare silicone rubber, OptiChem samples did not become colonized upon reimplantation despite the fact that surrounding tissues were always culture-positive. We conclude that the commercial OptiChem coating considerably slows down bacterial biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, making it an attractive candidate for biomaterials implant coating.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19733265
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9041
      1. Author :
        Sottnik, Joseph L; U'Ren, Lance W; Thamm, Douglas H; Withrow, Stephen J; Dow, Steven W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer immunology, immunotherapy: CII
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chronic Disease; Disease Models, Animal; Immunity, Innate; Killer Cells, Natural; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred Strains; Monocytes; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Osteomyelitis; Osteosarcoma; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Clinical studies over the past several years have reported that metastasis-free survival times in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma are significantly increased in patients that develop chronic bacterial osteomyelitis at their surgical site. However, the immunological mechanism by which osteomyelitis may suppress tumor growth has not been investigated. Therefore, we used a mouse model of osteomyelitis to assess the effects of bone infection on innate immunity and tumor growth. A chronic Staphylococcal osteomyelitis model was established in C3H mice and the effects of infection on tumor growth of syngeneic DLM8 osteosarcoma were assessed. The effects of infection on tumor angiogenesis and innate immunity, including NK cell and monocyte responses, were assessed. We found that osteomyelitis significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in mice, and that the effect was independent of the infecting bacterial type, tumor type, or mouse strain. Depletion of NK cells or monocytes reversed the antitumor activity elicited by infection. Moreover, infected mice had a significant increase in circulating monocytes and numbers of tumor associated macrophages. Infection suppressed tumor angiogenesis but did not affect the numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Therefore, we concluded that chronic localized bacterial infection could elicit significant systemic antitumor activity dependent on NK cells and macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19701748
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9980
      1. Author :
        Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Wound repair and regeneration: official publication of the Wound Healing Society [and] the European Tissue Repair Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        16
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bandages; Biocompatible Materials; Bioware; Chitosan; Cyclophosphamide; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Staphylococcal Skin Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Wound Healing; Wound Infection; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        HemCon bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18471261
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9986
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Brazilian dental journal
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Colony Count, Microbial; Cuspid; Dental Pulp Cavity; Disinfectants; Drug Combinations; Genetic Engineering; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Incisor; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Maxilla; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Root Canal Irrigants; Root Canal Preparation; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium Hypochlorite; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Microbial infection plays an important role in the development of pulp necrosis and formation of periapical lesions. In vitro and in vivo research in this field, traditionally microbiological culture methods using paper point sampling and quantitative culture, faces difficulties in completely removing bacteria from the root canal system and analyzing sequential procedures. This study employed genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria and a light-sensitive imaging system to allow real-time visualization of the infection. Ten extracted teeth incubated with P. aeruginosa were treated by mechanical instrumentation with K-files (#30 K-file, #35 K-file and #40 K-file) and chemical irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide. Irrigation alone reduced the contamination in 18%; the first chemomechanical sequence (instrumentation with a #30 K-file + irrigation) provided 41% of reduction; the second sequence (#35 K-file + irrigation) achieved 62%; and the complete therapy (#30 K-file + #35 K-file + #40 K-file + irrigation) achieved 93% of bacterial reduction. These results suggest that the endodontic treatment is dependent on the association of a chemical and mechanical approaches and that root canal enlargement improves bacterial reduction probably because the irrigation has more access to the apical third.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18176710
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9998
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, Ruxana T; Zeng, Heng; Yull, Fiona E; Li, Bo; Cheng, Dong-sheng; Kernodle, Douglas S; Jansen, E Duco; Contag, Christopher H; Segal, Brahm H; Holland, Steven M; Blackwell, Timothy S; Christman, John W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        172
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Cells, Cultured; Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic; Immunity, Innate; Lung; Macrophages; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Inbred DBA; Mice, Transgenic; NADPH Oxidase; Neutrophil Infiltration; NF-kappa B; Phosphoproteins; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Pseudomonas Infections; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Toll-Like Receptors; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        We examined the role of redox signaling generated by NADPH oxidase in activation of NF-kappaB and host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Using mice with an NF-kappaB-driven luciferase reporter construct (HIV-LTR/luciferase (HLL)), we found that intratracheal administration of P. aeruginosa resulted in a dose-dependent neutrophilic influx and activation of NF-kappaB. To determine the effects of reactive oxygen species generated by the NADPH oxidase system on activation of NF-kappaB, we crossbred mice deficient in p47(phox) with NF-kappaB reporter mice (p47(phox-/-)HLL). These p47(phox-/-)HLL mice were unable to activate NF-kappaB to the same degree as HLL mice with intact NADPH oxidase following P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, lung TNF-alpha levels were significantly lower in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice compared with HLL mice. Bacterial clearance was impaired in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice. In vitro studies using bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that Toll-like receptor 4 was necessary for NF-kappaB activation following treatment with P. aeruginosa. Additional studies with macrophages from p47(phox-/-) mice confirmed that redox signaling was necessary for maximal Toll-like receptor 4-dependent NF-kappaB activation in this model. These data indicate that the NADPH oxidase-dependent respiratory burst stimulated by Pseudomonas infection contributes to host defense by modulating redox-dependent signaling through the NF-kappaB pathway.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14734763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9999
      1. Author :
        Xiao, Kai; Luo, Juntao; Fowler, Wiley L; Li, Yuanpei; Lee, Joyce S; Xing, Li; Cheng, R Holland; Wang, Li; Lam, Kit S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        30
      8. Issue :
        30
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Albumins; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Biocompatible Materials; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Delivery Systems; Emulsifying Agents; Female; Humans; Male; Maximum Tolerated Dose; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanoparticles; Ovarian Neoplasms; Paclitaxel; Polyethylene Glycols; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of a variety of cancers. However, it is associated with serious side effects caused by PTX itself and the Cremophor EL emulsifier. In the present study, we report the development of a well-defined amphiphilic linear-dendritic copolymer (named as telodendrimer) composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG), cholic acid (CA, a facial amphiphilic molecule) and lysine, which can form drug-loaded core/shell micelles when mixed with hydrophobic drug, such as PTX, under aqueous condition. We have used PEG(5k)-CA(8), a representive telodendrimer, to prepare paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles (PTX-PEG(5k)-CA(8) NPs) with high loading capacity (7.3 mg PTX/mL) and a size of 20-60 nm. This novel nanoformulation of PTX was found to exhibit similar in vitro cytotoxic activity against ovarian cancer cells as the free drug (Taxol) or paclitaxel/human serum albumin nanoaggregate (Abraxane). The maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) of PTX-PEG(5k)-CA(8) NPs after single dose and five consecutive daily doses in mice were approximately 75 and 45 mg PTX/kg, respectively, which were 2.5-fold higher than those of Taxol. In both subcutaneous and orthotopic intraperitoneal murine models of ovarian cancer, PTX-PEG(5k)-CA(8) NPs achieved superior toxicity profiles and anti-tumor effects compared to Taxol and Abraxane at equivalent PTX doses, which were attributed to their preferential tumor accumulation, and deep penetration into tumor tissue, as confirmed by near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19660809
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9013
      1. Author :
        Takeshita, Fumitaka; Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Nagahara, Shunji; Honma, Kimi; Sasaki, Hideo; Hirai, Kotaro; Teratani, Takumi; Namatame, Nachi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hanai, Koji; Kato, Takashi; Sano, Akihiko; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        102
      8. Issue :
        34
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Collagen; DNA-Binding Proteins; Drug Carriers; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Gene Therapy; Humans; Luciferases; Male; Mice; PC-3M-luc; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Prostatic Neoplasms; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; RNA, Small Interfering; Transcription Factors
      12. Abstract :
        Silencing of gene expression by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is rapidly becoming a powerful tool for genetic analysis and represents a potential strategy for therapeutic product development. However, there are no reports of systemic delivery for siRNAs toward treatment of bone-metastatic cancer. Accordingly, we report here that i.v. injection of GL3 luciferase siRNA complexed with atelocollagen showed effective reduction of luciferase expression from bone-metastatic prostate tumor cells developed in mouse thorax, jaws, and/or legs. We also show that the siRNA/atelocollagen complex can be efficiently delivered to tumors 24 h after injection and can exist intact at least for 3 days. Furthermore, atelocollagen-mediated systemic administration of siRNAs such as enhancer of zeste homolog 2 and phosphoinositide 3'-hydroxykinase p110-alpha-subunit, which were selected as candidate targets for inhibition of bone metastasis, resulted in an efficient inhibition of metastatic tumor growth in bone tissues. In addition, upregulation of serum IL-12 and IFN-alpha levels was not associated with the in vivo administration of the siRNA/atelocollagen complex. Thus, for treatment of bone metastasis of prostate cancer, an atelocollagen-mediated systemic delivery method could be a reliable and safe approach to the achievement of maximal function of siRNA.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16091473
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8979
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