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      1. Author :
        Kimberly A. Kelly; Nabeel Bardeesy; Rajesh Anbazhagan; Sushma Gurumurthy; Justin Berger; Herlen Alencar; Ronald A. DePinho; Umar Mahmood; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        PLoS Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer; Biology
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) carries an extremely poor prognosis, typically presenting with metastasis at the time of diagnosis and exhibiting profound resistance to existing therapies. The development of molecular markers and imaging probes for incipient PDAC would enable earlier detection and guide the development of interventive therapies. Here we sought to identify novel molecular markers and to test their potential as targeted imaging agents.

        Methods and Findings: Here, a phage display approach was used in a mouse model of PDAC to screen for peptides that specifically bind to cell surface antigens on PDAC cells. These screens yielded a motif that distinguishes PDAC cells from normal pancreatic duct cells in vitro, which, upon proteomics analysis, identified plectin-1 as a novel biomarker of PDAC. To assess their utility for in vivo imaging, the plectin-1 targeted peptides (PTP) were conjugated to magnetofluorescent nanoparticles. In conjunction with intravital confocal microscopy and MRI, these nanoparticles enabled detection of small PDAC and precursor lesions in engineered mouse models.

        Conclusions: Our approach exploited a well-defined model of PDAC, enabling rapid identification and validation of PTP. The developed specific imaging probe, along with the discovery of plectin-1 as a novel biomarker, may have clinical utility in the diagnosis and management of PDAC in humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.0050085
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4478
      1. Author :
        Vasilis Ntziachristos
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        The Proceedings of the American Thoracic Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; FMT; fluorescence; tomography; proteases; lung; inflammation; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Biomedical imaging has become an important tool in the study of “-omics” fields by allowing the noninvasive visualization of functional and molecular events using in vivo staining and reporter gene approaches. This capacity can go beyond the understanding of the genetic basis and phenotype of such respiratory conditions as acute bronchitis, adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and asthma and investigate the development of disease and of therapeutic events longitudinally and in unperturbed environments. Herein, we show how the application of novel quantitative optical imaging methods, using transillumination and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT), can allow visualization of pulmonary inflammation in small animals in vivo. The results confirm prior observations using a protease-sensitive probe. We discuss how this approach enables in vivo insights at the system level as to the dynamic role of proteases in respiratory pathophysiology and their potential as therapeutic targets. Overall, the proposed imaging method can be used with a significantly wider range of possible targets and applications in lung imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://pats.atsjournals.org/cgi/content/full/6/5/416
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4534
      1. Author :
        Ignat M, Aprahamian M, Lindner V, Altmeyer A, Perretta S, Dallemagne B, Mutter D and Marescaux J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Gastroenterology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        137
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; AngioSense; AngioSpark; in vivo imaging; pancreatic cancer
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND & AIMS: Surgical management of pancreatic cancer depends on tumor resectability and staging. This study evaluated a new in vivo technique, fiberoptic confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), for detection and staging of pancreatic tumors in rats.

        METHODS: FCFM was used with a protease-activated fluorescent marker (ProSense; VisEn Medical Inc, Woburn, MA) for in vivo imaging of solid organs (1.8-microm resolution) in a rat model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. A preliminary study described the FCFM rendering of normal and pathologic tissues. Subsequently, 2 double-blind studies compared FCFM to standard histology in (1) detection of tumors in rat models of cancer and controls and (2) detection of nodal involvement (splenic, celiac, mesenteric, and colic) 4, 5, and 6 weeks after tumor induction vs controls.

        RESULTS: Tumor cells displayed a fluorescent ductal pattern compared with non-fluorescent normal pancreas or normal follicular pattern of lymph nodes (LNs). FCFM detected all the pancreatic tumors (1.7-mm mean diameter) and identified 23 LNs that contained metastases of 99 LNs examined. Standard histologic analyses resulted in 1 false-negative result in tumor detection and 2 false negatives in LN detection, whereas FCFM produced no false-negative results. Additional serial sectioning confirmed all tumors and 16 metastatic LNs; FCFM had a negative predictive value of 100% and a positive predictive value of 69.6%.

        CONCLUSIONS: Real-time “virtual biopsy” using FCFM detects tumors and LN metastases with 100% sensitivity and 92.2% specificity in rats, making it a reliable technique for detection and staging of pancreatic cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19632230
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4540
      1. Author :
        Kim DE, Kim JY, Schellingerhout D, Shon SM, Jeong SW, Kim EJ and Kim WK
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques causes plaque vulnerability and rupture, leading to thromboembolic complications. Cathepsin B (CatB) proteases secreted by macrophages play a major role in plaque inflammation. We used a CatB-activatable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agent to demonstrate the inflammatory component in mice atheromata and the atherosclerosis- modulating effects of atorvastatin or glucosamine treatments. Apolipoprotein E knockout mice (n = 35) were fed normal chow, a Western diet, a Western diet + atorvastatin, a Western diet + glucosamine, or a Western diet + atorvastatin + glucosamine for 14 weeks. Twenty-four hours after the intravenous injection of a CatB-activatable probe, ex vivo NIRF imaging of the aortas and brains was performed, followed by histology. The CatB-related signal, observed in the aortas but not in the cerebral arteries, correlated very well with protease activity and the presence of macrophages on histology. Animals on Western diets could be distinguished from animals on a normal diet. The antiatherosclerotic effects of atorvastatin and glucosamine could be demonstrated, with reduced CatB-related signal compared with untreated animals. Plaque populations were heterogeneous within individuals, with some plaques showing a high and others a lower CatB-related signal. These differences in signal intensity could not be predicted by visual inspection of the plaques but did correlate with histologic evidence of inflammation in every case. This suggests that vulnerable inflamed plaques can be identified by optical molecular imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.bcdecker.com/pubMedLinkOut.aspx?pub=MIO&vol=8&iss=5&page=291
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4558
      1. Author :
        Zhang, H-Y; Man, J-H; Liang, B; Zhou, T; Wang, C-H; Li, T; Li, H-Y; Li, W-H; Jin, B-F; Zhang, P-J; Zhao, J; Pan, X; He, K; Gong, W-L; Zhang, X-M; Li, A-L
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer gene therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Apoptosis; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Escherichia coli; Female; Flow Cytometry; Gene Therapy; Genetic Vectors; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; NCI-H460-luc2; Neoplasms; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Survival Rate; TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand
      12. Abstract :
        The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent inducer of tumor cell apoptosis, but concerns of considerable liver toxicity limit its uses in human cancer therapy. Here, we show that i.v. injected Escherichia coli DH5alpha (E. coli DH5alpha) specifically replicates in solid tumors and metastases in live animals. E. coli DH5alpha does not enter tumor cells and suits for being the vector for soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL), which induces apoptosis by activating cell-surface death receptors. With the high 'tumor-targeting' nature, we demonstrate that intratumoral (i.t.) and intravenous injection of sTRAIL-expressing E. coli DH5alpha results in the tumor-targeted release of biologically active molecules, which leads to a dramatic reduction in the tumor growth rate and the prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. TRAIL delivery by E. coli DH5alpha did not cause any detectable toxicity to any organs, suggesting that E. coli DH5alpha-delivered sTRAIL protein therapy may provide a feasible and effective form of treatment for solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20075981
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8944
      1. Author :
        Figg, William D; Li, Haiqing; Sissung, Tristan; Retter, Avi; Wu, Shenhong; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Phil; Wright, John J; Parnes, Howard; Fedenko, Kathy; Latham, Lea; Steinberg, Seth M; Jones, Elizabeth; Chen, Clara; Dahut, William
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        BJU international
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        99
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aged; Androgens; Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases; Bioware; Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System; Estramustine; Genotype; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Middle Aged; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Survival Analysis; Taxoids; Thalidomide; Treatment Outcome
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE To evaluate the combination of docetaxel plus estramustine (which prolongs survival in patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer, AIPC), and thalidomide (that also adds to docetaxel activity), both pre-clinically and clinically in AIPC. PATIENTS, MATERIALS AND METHODS In the pre-clinical evaluation we injected PC3 cells subcutaneously into severely combined immunodeficient mice and started treatment after the tumour volume reached 50 mm3. We also evaluated the combination using luciferase-labelled PC3M-luc-C6 cells in nude mice. We enrolled 20 patients with metastatic progressive AIPC into a phase II clinical trial to evaluate this combination. Docetaxel (30 mg/m2) was administered every week, for 3 of 4 weeks. The dose of thalidomide was 200 mg/day and estramustine was given three times a day at 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16 and 17 days. RESULTS In the mice, thalidomide with docetaxel plus estramustine reduced tumour volume by 88% at 17 days vs the control treatment (p=0.001). The combination of docetaxel, estramustine and thalidomide nearly eradicated the signal from the luciferase-expressing PC3M cells in the metastasis model. Clinically, the progression-free time was 7.2 months with this combination; 18 of 20 patients had a decline of half or more in prostate-specific antigen level and two of 10 patients with soft-tissue lesions had a partial response on computed tomography. There were 24 grade 3 and two grade 4 complications associated with this combination. There was a statistically significant association between overall survival and the CYP1B1*3 genotype (P=0.013). CONCLUSION Docetaxel-based chemotherapy is now regarded as a standard regimen for metastatic AIPC. The combination of estramustine, docetaxel and thalidomide is an advantageous treatment in pre-clinical models of prostate cancer and is a safe, tolerable and active regimen in patients with AIPC.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17437439
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8970
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