1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Headers act as filters

  • Records
      1. Author :
        Penna, F. J.; Chow, J. S.; Minnillo, B. J.; Passerotti, C. C.; Barnewolt, C. E.; Treves, S. T.; Fahey, F. H.; Dunning, P. S.; Freilich, D. A.; Retik, A. B.; Nguyen, H. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Urol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        185
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Diagnostic Imaging; Disease Models, Animal; Fluorescence; *Kidney Pelvis; Mice; Ureteral Obstruction/*diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: Radiological imaging is the mainstay of diagnosing ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Current established radiological modalities can potentially differentiate the varying degrees of obstruction but they are limited in functionality, applicability and/or comprehensiveness. Of particular concern is that some tests require radiation, which has long-term consequences, especially in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the novel use of Genhance 680 dynamic fluorescence imaging to assess ureteropelvic junction obstruction in 20 mice that underwent partial or complete unilateral ureteral obstruction. Ultrasound, mercaptoacetyltriglycine renography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence imaging were performed. RESULTS: Our model of partial and complete obstruction could be distinguished by ultrasound, mercaptoacetyltriglycine renography and magnetic resonance imaging, and was confirmed by histological analysis. Using fluorescence imaging distinct vascular and urinary parameters were identified in the partial and complete obstruction groups compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: Fluorescence imaging is a feasible alternative radiological imaging modality to diagnose ureteropelvic junction obstruction. It provides continuous, detailed imaging without the risk of radiation exposure.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21511294
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 14
      15. Serial :
        10473
      1. Author :
        Penna, F. J.; Freilich, D. A.; Alvarenga, C.; Nguyen, H. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Urology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        78
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Fluorescence; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Guinea Pigs; Lymph Node Excision/*methods; Male; Models, Animal; *Molecular Imaging; Retroperitoneal Space
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: To propose that fluorescent molecular imaging has utility in specifically identifying the lymph nodes, thereby enabling more definitive lymph node visualization and dissection. Retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) is an invasive procedure with significant morbidity. A minimally invasive approach would be of great clinical benefit but has been limited by the extensive perivascular dissection required to remove all lymphatic tissue. Directed lymph node visualization would allow a limited dissection, making a laparoscopic approach more feasible. METHODS: Ten male Hartley guinea pigs underwent nonsurvival RPLND, 5 with the protease activatable in vivo fluorescent molecular imaging agent, ProSense and 5 without image guidance (control). ProSense was administered 24 hours before surgery and detected 24 hours later using a photodynamic detector. In group 1, RPLND was first performed without molecular imaging followed by image-guided lymph node dissection for residual nodes. In group 2, the near infrared detector was used initially for lymph node excision followed by traditionally unassisted extraction of the residual lymph nodes. The lymph nodes were extracted, counted, and sent for histopathologic analysis. RESULTS: With the assistance of molecular imaging, no additional lymph nodes were identified after complete dissection, and all tissue identified by ProSense was confirmed by histopathologic analysis to be lymph nodes. Without molecular imaging, all lymph nodes were not identified, and in 2 instances, the tissue was incorrectly thought to be lymphatic tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular image-guided RPLND is a promising technique to improve in vivo, live visualization and dissection of lymph nodes and has the potential for application in improving the diagnosis and treatment of other urologic malignancies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21601249
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10474
      1. Author :
        Sabbagh, Y.; Graciolli, F. G.; O'Brien, S.; Tang, W.; dos Reis, L. M.; Ryan, S.; Phillips, L.; Boulanger, J.; Song, W.; Bracken, C.; Liu, S.; Ledbetter, S.; Dechow, P.; Canziani, M. E.; Carvalho, A. B.; Jorgetti, V.; Moyses, R. M.; Schiavi, S. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Bone Miner Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Biopsy; Bone Remodeling; Bone and Bones/metabolism/pathology; Calcification, Physiologic; Cardiovascular Abnormalities/blood/complications/pathology/physiopathology; *Disease Progression; Female; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation; Glycoproteins/metabolism; Humans; Kidney Failure, Chronic/blood/complications/pathology/physiopathology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Middle Aged; Mutation/genetics; Osteoclasts/metabolism/pathology; Osteocytes/*metabolism/*pathology; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics; Renal Osteodystrophy/blood/*metabolism/*pathology/physiopathology; Vascular Calcification; *Wnt Signaling Pathway/genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is defined by abnormalities in mineral and hormone metabolism, bone histomorphometric changes, and/or the presence of soft-tissue calcification. Emerging evidence suggests that features of CKD-MBD may occur early in disease progression and are associated with changes in osteocyte function. To identify early changes in bone, we utilized the jck mouse, a genetic model of polycystic kidney disease that exhibits progressive renal disease. At 6 weeks of age, jck mice have normal renal function and no evidence of bone disease but exhibit continual decline in renal function and death by 20 weeks of age, when approximately 40% to 60% of them have vascular calcification. Temporal changes in serum parameters were identified in jck relative to wild-type mice from 6 through 18 weeks of age and were subsequently shown to largely mirror serum changes commonly associated with clinical CKD-MBD. Bone histomorphometry revealed progressive changes associated with increased osteoclast activity and elevated bone formation relative to wild-type mice. To capture the early molecular and cellular events in the progression of CKD-MBD we examined cell-specific pathways associated with bone remodeling at the protein and/or gene expression level. Importantly, a steady increase in the number of cells expressing phosphor-Ser33/37-beta-catenin was observed both in mouse and human bones. Overall repression of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling within osteocytes occurred in conjunction with increased expression of Wnt antagonists (SOST and sFRP4) and genes associated with osteoclast activity, including receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). The resulting increase in the RANKL/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio correlated with increased osteoclast activity. In late-stage disease, an apparent repression of genes associated with osteoblast function was observed. These data confirm that jck mice develop progressive biochemical changes in CKD-MBD and suggest that repression of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of renal osteodystrophy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22492547
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10475
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10476
      1. Author :
        Tremoleda, J. L.; Khalil, M.; Gompels, L. L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, M.; Vincent, T.; Gsell, W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        EJNMMI Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense
      12. Abstract :
        Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22214535
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10477
      1. Author :
        van der Horst, G.; van der Pluijm, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Future Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Humans; Molecular Imaging/methods; Neoplasm Metastasis/diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        Bone metastasis is a complex process that ultimately leads to devastating metastatic bone disease. It is therefore of key interest to unravel the mechanisms underlying the multistep process of skeletal metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease, and to develop better treatment and management of patients with this devastating disease. Fortunately, novel technologies are rapidly emerging that allow real-time imaging of molecules, pathogenic processes, drug delivery and drug response in preclinical in vivo models. The outcome of these experimental studies will facilitate clinical cancer research by improving the detection of cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapy response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22515445
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10478
      1. Author :
        Pribaz, J. R.; Bernthal, N. M.; Billi, F.; Cho, J. S.; Ramos, R. I.; Guo, Y.; Cheung, A. L.; Francis, K. P.; Miller, L. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        N/A
      12. Abstract :
        Post-arthroplasty infections are a devastating problem in orthopaedic surgery. While acute infections can be treated with a single stage washout and liner exchange, chronic infections lead to multiple reoperations, prolonged antibiotic courses, extended disability, and worse clinical outcomes. Unlike previous mouse models that studied an acute infection, this work aimed to develop a model of a chronic post-arthroplasty infection. To achieve this, a stainless steel implant in the knee joints of mice was inoculated with a bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus strain (1 x 10(2) -1 x 10(4) colony forming units, CFUs) and in vivo imaging was used to monitor the bacterial burden for 42 days. Four different S. aureus strains were compared in which the bioluminescent construct was integrated in an antibiotic selection plasmid (ALC2906), the bacterial chromosome (Xen29 and Xen40), or a stable plasmid (Xen36). ALC2906 had increased bioluminescent signals through day 10, after which the signals became undetectable. In contrast, Xen29, Xen40, and Xen36 had increased bioluminescent signals through 42 days with the highest signals observed with Xen36. ALC2906, Xen29, and Xen40 induced significantly more inflammation than Xen36 as measured by in vivo enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-neutrophil flourescence of LysEGFP mice. All four strains induced comparable biofilm formation as determined by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy. Using a titanium implant, Xen36 had higher in vivo bioluminescence signals than Xen40 but had similar biofilm formation and adherent bacteria. In conclusion, Xen29, Xen40, and especially Xen36, which had stable bioluminescent constructs, are feasible for long-term in vivo monitoring of bacterial burden and biofilm formation to study chronic post-arthroplasty infections and potential antimicrobial interventions. (c) 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21837686
      14. Call Number :
        142237
      15. Serial :
        6983
      1. Author :
        Liao, A. H.; Li, Y. K.; Lee, W. J.; Wu, M. F.; Liu, H. L.; Kuo, M. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Ultrasound Med Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        The application of drug-loaded microbubbles (MBs) in combination with ultrasound (US), which results in an increase in capillary permeability at the site of US-sonication-induced MB destruction, may be an efficient method of localized drug delivery. This study investigated the mechanism underlying the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs through the blood vessels to targeted cells using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) system. The luciferin-loaded MBs comprised an albumin shell with a diameter of 1234 +/- 394 nm (mean +/- SD) and contained 2.48 x 10(9) bubbles/mL; within each MB, the concentration of encapsulated luciferin was 1.48 x 10(-)(1)(0) mg/bubble. The loading efficiency of luciferin in MBs was only about 19.8%, while maintaining both the bioluminescence and acoustic properties. In vitro and in vivo BLI experiments were performed to evaluate the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs. For in vitro results, the increase in light emission of luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs after destruction via US sonication (6.24 +/- 0.72 x 10(7) photons/s) was significantly higher than that in the luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs (3.11 +/- 0.33 x 10(7) photons/s) (p < 0.05). The efficiency of the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs in 4T1-luc2 tumor-bearing mice was also estimated. The signal intensity of the tumor with US destruction at 3 W/cm(2) for 30 s was significantly higher than without US destruction at 3 (p = 0.025), 5 (p = 0.013), 7 (p = 0.012) and 10 (p = 0.032) min after injecting luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs. The delivery efficiency was, thus, improved with US-mediated release, allowing reduction of the total injection dose of luciferin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22929655
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10481
      1. Author :
        von Schwarzenberg, K.; Wiedmann, R. M.; Oak, P.; Schulz, S.; Zischka, H.; Wanner, G.; Efferth, T.; Trauner, D.; Vollmar, A. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit proton pump, has come into focus as an attractive target in cancer invasion. However little is known about the role of V-ATPase in cell death and especially the underlying mechanisms remain mostly unknown. We used the myxobacterial macrolide archazolid B, a potent inhibitor of the V-ATPase, as an experimental drug as well as a chemical tool to decipher V-ATPase related cell death signaling. We found that archazolid induced apoptosis in highly invasive tumor cells at nanomolar concentrations which was executed by the mitochondrial pathway. Prior to apoptosis induction archazolid lead to the activation of a cellular stress response including activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1alpha) and autophagy. Autophagy was induced at low concentrations of archazolid that do not alter pH in lysosomes and was shown by degradation of p62 or fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. HIF1alpha was induced due to energy stress shown by a decline of the ATP level and followed by a shut down of energy consuming processes. As silencing HIF1alpha increases apoptosis, the cellular stress response was suggested to be a survival mechanism. We conclude that archazolid leads to energy stress which activates adaptive mechanisms like autophagy mediated by HIF1alpha and finally leads to apoptosis. We propose V-ATPase as a promising drugable target in cancer therapy caught up at the interplay of apoptosis, autophagy and cellular/metabolic stress.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23168408
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10480
      1. Author :
        Zhang, Z.; Hu, Z.; Gupta, J.; Krimmel, J. D.; Gerseny, H. M.; Berg, A. F.; Robbins, J. S.; Du, H.; Prabhakar, B.; Seth, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Adenoviridae/genetics/*metabolism/physiology; Administration, Intravenous; Animals; Bone Neoplasms/secondary/*therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Humans; Immunocompetence; Luminescent Measurements/methods; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/*therapy; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Oncolytic Virotherapy/methods; Oncolytic Viruses/genetics/metabolism/physiology; Phosphorylation; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics/*metabolism; Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta/genetics/*metabolism; Signal Transduction; Smad2 Protein/genetics/metabolism; Telomerase/genetics; Transforming Growth Factor beta1/genetics/metabolism; Transplantation, Isogeneic/methods; Tumor Stem Cell Assay/methods; Virus Replication
      12. Abstract :
        We have examined the effect of adenoviruses expressing soluble transforming growth factor receptorII-Fc (sTGFbetaRIIFc) in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor bone metastasis model using syngeneic BALB/c mice. Infection of 4T1 cells with a non-replicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).sTbetaRFc, or with two oncolytic adenoviruses, Ad.sTbetaRFc and TAd.sTbetaRFc, expressing sTGFbetaRIIFc (the human TERT promoter drives viral replication in TAd.sTbetaRFc) produced sTGFbetaRIIFc protein. Oncolytic adenoviruses produced viral replication and induced cytotoxicity in 4T1 cells. 4T1 cells were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TGFbeta-1 (up to 10 ng ml(-1)). However, TGFbeta-1 induced the phosphorylation of SMAD2 and SMAD3, which were inhibited by co-incubation with sTGFbetaRIIFc protein. TGFbeta-1 also induced interleukin-11, a well-known osteolytic factor. Intracardiac injection of 4T1-luc2 cells produced bone metastases by day 4. Intravenous injection of Ad.sTbetaRFc (on days 5 and 7) followed by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of mice on days 7, 11 and 14 in tumor-bearing mice indicated inhibition of bone metastasis progression (P<0.05). X-ray radiography of mice on day 14 showed a significant reduction of the lesion size by Ad.sTbetaRFc (P<0.01) and TAd.sTbetaRFc (P<0.05). Replication-deficient virus Ad(E1-).sTbetaRFc expressing sTGFbetaRIIFc showed some inhibition of bone metastasis, whereas Ad(E1-).Null was not effective in inhibiting bone metastases. Thus, systemic administration of Ad.sTbetaRFc and TAd.sTbetaRFc can inhibit bone metastasis in the 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model, and can be developed as potential anti-tumor agents for breast cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744210
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10479