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      1. Author :
        Rahul Anil Sheth; Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        299
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Colorectal cancer; optical imaging; molecular imaging; cancer genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Colorectal cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The advent of molecular therapies targeted against specific, stereotyped cellular mutations that occur in this disease has ushered in new hope for treatment options. However, key questions regarding the optimal dosing schedules, dosing duration, and patient selection remain unanswered. In this review, we describe how recent advances in molecular imaging, specifically optical molecular imaging with fluorescent probes, offer potential solutions to these questions and may play a key role in improving outcomes. We begin with an overview of optical molecular imaging, including a discussion on the various methods of design for fluorescent probes and the clinically relevant imaging systems that have been built to image them. We then focus on the relevance of optical molecular imaging to colorectal cancer. We review the most recent data on how this imaging modality has been applied to the measurement of treatment efficacy for currently available as well as some as-of-yet developmental molecularly targeted therapies in animal studies. We then conclude with a discussion on how this imaging approach has already begun to be translated clinically for human use.
      13. URL :
        http://ajpgi.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/ajpgi.00195.2010v1
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4484
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, D. E.; Oei, Y.; Hornig, Y. S.; Yu, S. F.; Dusich, J.; Purchio, T.; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
        Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to improve and refine traditional murine models of tumor growth and metastasis
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Clinical and Experimental Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8 cells; Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Colonic Neoplasms/pathology, Fluorouracil/therapeutic use, Humans, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Longitudinal Studies, Luciferases/diagnostic use, Luminescent Measurements, Lung Neoplasms/ secondary, Lymphatic Metastasis, Male, Mice, Mice, SCID, Mitomycin/therapeutic use, Models, Biological, Neoplasm Transplantation, Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy/ pathology IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits sensitive in vivo detection and quantification of cells specifically engineered to emit visible light. Three stable human tumor cell lines engineered to express luciferase were assessed for their tumorigenicity in subcutaneous, intravenous and spontaneous metastasis models. Bioluminescent PC-3M-luc-C6 human prostate cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into SCID-beige mice and were monitored for tumor growth and response to 5-FU and mitomycin C treatments. Progressive tumor development and inhibition/regression following drug treatment were observed and quantified in vivo using BLI. Imaging data correlated to standard external caliper measurements of tumor volume, but bioluminescent data permitted earlier detection of tumor growth. In a lung colonization model, bioluminescent A549-luc-C8 human lung cancer cells were injected intravenously and lung metastases were monitored in vivo by whole animal imaging. Anesthetized mice were imaged weekly allowing a temporal assessment of in vivo lung tumor growth. This longitudinal study design permitted an accurate, real-time evaluation of tumor burden in the same animals over time. End-point bioluminescence measured in vivo correlated to total lung weight at necropsy. For a spontaneous metastatic tumor model, bioluminescent HT-29-luc-D6 human colon cancer cells implanted subcutaneously produced metastases to lung and lymph nodes in SCID-beige mice. Both primary tumors and micrometastases were detected by BLI in vivo. Ex vivo imaging of excised lung lobes and lymph nodes confirmed the in vivo signals and indicated a slightly higher frequency of metastasis in some mice. Levels of bioluminescence from in vivo and ex vivo images corresponded to the frequency and size of metastatic lesions in lungs and lymph nodes as subsequently confirmed by histology. In summary, BLI provided rapid, non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth and regression in animals. Its application to traditional oncology animal models offers quantitative and sensitive analysis of tumor growth and metastasis. The ability to temporally assess tumor development and responses to drug therapies in vivo also improves upon current standard animal models that are based on single end point data.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        139189
      15. Serial :
        5565
      1. Author :
        Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor
      2. Title :
        Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: A possible implication for atherogenesis
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Food Funct.
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease.
      13. URL :
        N/A
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @ 6049
      15. Serial :
        14630
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