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      1. Author :
        Pribaz, J. R.; Bernthal, N. M.; Billi, F.; Cho, J. S.; Ramos, R. I.; Guo, Y.; Cheung, A. L.; Francis, K. P.; Miller, L. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        N/A
      12. Abstract :
        Post-arthroplasty infections are a devastating problem in orthopaedic surgery. While acute infections can be treated with a single stage washout and liner exchange, chronic infections lead to multiple reoperations, prolonged antibiotic courses, extended disability, and worse clinical outcomes. Unlike previous mouse models that studied an acute infection, this work aimed to develop a model of a chronic post-arthroplasty infection. To achieve this, a stainless steel implant in the knee joints of mice was inoculated with a bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus strain (1 x 10(2) -1 x 10(4) colony forming units, CFUs) and in vivo imaging was used to monitor the bacterial burden for 42 days. Four different S. aureus strains were compared in which the bioluminescent construct was integrated in an antibiotic selection plasmid (ALC2906), the bacterial chromosome (Xen29 and Xen40), or a stable plasmid (Xen36). ALC2906 had increased bioluminescent signals through day 10, after which the signals became undetectable. In contrast, Xen29, Xen40, and Xen36 had increased bioluminescent signals through 42 days with the highest signals observed with Xen36. ALC2906, Xen29, and Xen40 induced significantly more inflammation than Xen36 as measured by in vivo enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-neutrophil flourescence of LysEGFP mice. All four strains induced comparable biofilm formation as determined by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy. Using a titanium implant, Xen36 had higher in vivo bioluminescence signals than Xen40 but had similar biofilm formation and adherent bacteria. In conclusion, Xen29, Xen40, and especially Xen36, which had stable bioluminescent constructs, are feasible for long-term in vivo monitoring of bacterial burden and biofilm formation to study chronic post-arthroplasty infections and potential antimicrobial interventions. (c) 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21837686
      14. Call Number :
        142237
      15. Serial :
        6983
      1. Author :
        Motohara, T.; Masuko, S.; Ishimoto, T.; Yae, T.; Onishi, N.; Muraguchi, T.; Hirao, A.; Matsuzaki, Y.; Tashiro, H.; Katabuchi, H.; Saya, H.; Nagano, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Carcinogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, Neoplasm/genetics/metabolism; Apoptosis; Blotting, Western; Cell Adhesion; Cell Adhesion Molecules/genetics/metabolism; Cell Differentiation; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/metabolism/*pathology; Female; Flow Cytometry; Immunoenzyme Techniques; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplastic Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology; Ovarian Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*pathology; Ovary/metabolism/*pathology; Peritoneal Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/*secondary; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc/genetics/metabolism; Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/genetics/metabolism; RNA, Messenger/genetics; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Although the existence of tumor-initiating cells (T-ICs) in several types of human cancer has been documented, the contribution of somatic stem cells to the development of T-ICs has remained unclear. Here, we show that normal mouse ovary contains epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing stem-like cells that possess the ability to differentiate into cytokeratin 8 (CK8)-expressing epithelial progeny cells. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated transient depletion of the tumor suppressor p53 followed by retrovirus-mediated transfer of c-Myc and K-Ras oncogenes in EpCAM-expressing ovarian stem-like cells resulted in the generation of ovarian T-ICs. The established ovarian T-ICs gave rise to hierarchically organized lethal tumors in vivo and were able to undergo peritoneal metastasis. Finally, subsequent RNA interference-mediated knockdown of p53 in tumor cells triggered the expansion of EpCAM-expressing stem-like tumor cells and induced further tumor growth. These data reveal a role for p53 in the development and expansion of ovarian stem-like tumor cells and subsequent malignant progression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21828057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10374
      1. Author :
        Pettersson, U. S.; Christoffersson, G.; Massena, S.; Ahl, D.; Jansson, L.; Henriksnas, J.; Phillipson, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Animals; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Cell Adhesion/drug effects; Cell Count; Cell Movement/drug effects; Chemokine CXCL2/pharmacology; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/blood/complications/*immunology/microbiology; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood/complications/*immunology/microbiology; Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects; Disease Models, Animal; Hyperglycemia/chemically induced/complications; Inflammation/blood/complications/immunology/microbiology; Leukocytes/cytology/drug effects/*immunology/microbiology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Phagocytes/cytology/drug effects/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus/physiology
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Patients suffering from diabetes show defective bacterial clearance. This study investigates the effects of elevated plasma glucose levels during diabetes on leukocyte recruitment and function in established models of inflammation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Diabetes was induced in C57Bl/6 mice by intravenous alloxan (causing severe hyperglycemia), or by high fat diet (moderate hyperglycemia). Leukocyte recruitment was studied in anaesthetized mice using intravital microscopy of exposed cremaster muscles, where numbers of rolling, adherent and emigrated leukocytes were quantified before and during exposure to the inflammatory chemokine MIP-2 (0.5 nM). During basal conditions, prior to addition of chemokine, the adherent and emigrated leukocytes were increased in both alloxan- (62+/-18% and 85+/-21%, respectively) and high fat diet-induced (77+/-25% and 86+/-17%, respectively) diabetes compared to control mice. MIP-2 induced leukocyte emigration in all groups, albeit significantly more cells emigrated in alloxan-treated mice (15.3+/-1.0) compared to control (8.0+/-1.1) mice. Bacterial clearance was followed for 10 days after subcutaneous injection of bioluminescent S. aureus using non-invasive IVIS imaging, and the inflammatory response was assessed by Myeloperoxidase-ELISA and confocal imaging. The phagocytic ability of leukocytes was assessed using LPS-coated fluorescent beads and flow cytometry. Despite efficient leukocyte recruitment, alloxan-treated mice demonstrated an impaired ability to clear bacterial infection, which we found correlated to a 50% decreased phagocytic ability of leukocytes in diabetic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that reduced ability to clear bacterial infections observed during experimentally induced diabetes is not due to reduced leukocyte recruitment since sustained hyperglycemia results in increased levels of adherent and emigrated leukocytes in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Instead, decreased phagocytic ability observed for leukocytes isolated from diabetic mice might account for the impaired bacterial clearance.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21799868
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 20
      15. Serial :
        10455
      1. Author :
        Meincke, M.; Tiwari, S.; Hattermann, K.; Kalthoff, H.; Mentlein, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Clin Exp Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/metabolism/*pathology; Cattle; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/diagnostic use; Glioma/metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Mice; Mice, Nude; Receptors, CXCR/*metabolism; Receptors, CXCR4/*metabolism; Serum Albumin, Bovine/metabolism; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        The chemokine CXCL12/SDF-1 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 play a major role in tumor invasion, proliferation and metastasis. Since both receptors are overexpressed on distinct tumor cells and on the tumor vasculature, we evaluated their potential as targets for detection of cancers by molecular imaging. We synthesized conjugates of CXCL12 and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye IRDye((R))800CW, tested their selectivity, sensitivity and biological activity in vitro and their feasibility to visualize tumors in vivo. Purified CXCL12-conjugates detected in vitro as low as 500 A764 human glioma cells or MCF-7 breast cancer cells that express CXCR7 alone or together with CXCR4. Binding was time- and concentration-dependent, and the label could be competitively displaced by the native peptide. Control conjugates with bovine serum albumin or lactalbumin failed to label the cells. In mice, the conjugate distributed rapidly. After 1-92 h, subcutaneous tumors of human MCF-7 and A764 cells in immunodeficient mice were detected with high sensitivity. Background was observed in particular in liver within the first 24 h, but also skull and hind limbs yielded some background. Overall, fluorescent CXCL12-conjugates are sensitive and selective probes to detect solid and metastatic tumors by targeting tumor cells and tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21735100
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10372
      1. Author :
        Hu, Z.; Gerseny, H.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, Y. J.; Berg, A.; Stock, S.; Seth, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        In recent years, oncolytic adenoviruses have shown some promise as a novel class of antitumor agents. However, their utility in targeting bone metastases is relatively less studied. We have examined whether the systemic therapy of oncolytic adenoviruses expressing the soluble form of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) receptor II fused with human immunoglobulin G1 can be developed for the treatment of established breast cancer bone metastases. MDA-MB-231-luc2 human breast cancer cells were injected in the left heart ventricle of nude mice to establish bone metastasis. Mice with hind limb tumors were administered (on days 8 and 11) oncolytic adenoviruses-Ad.sTbetaRFc or mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc. Skeletal tumor growth was monitored weekly by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and radiography. At the termination time on day 28, hind limb bones were analyzed for tumor burden, synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and osteoclast activation. Intravenous delivery of Ad.sTbetaRFc and mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc induced significant inhibition of tumor growth, reduction of tumor burden, osteoclast activation, and increased animals' survival. Oncolytic adenoviruses were safer than dl309, a wild-type virus. A slight elevation of liver enzyme activity was observed after Ad.sTbetaRFc administration; this subsided with time. Based on these studies, we believe that Ad.sTbetaRFc and mhTERTAd.sTbetaRFc can be developed as a safe and effective approach for the treatment of established bone metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712815
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10493
      1. Author :
        Mathew, B.; Jacobson, J. R.; Berdyshev, E.; Huang, Y.; Sun, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gerhold, L. M.; Siegler, J.; Evenoski, C.; Wang, T.; Zhou, T.; Zaidi, R.; Moreno-Vinasco, L.; Bittman, R.; Chen, C. T.; LaRiviere, P. J.; Sammani, S.; Lussier, Y. A.; Dudek, S. M.; Natarajan, V.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Garcia, J. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Faseb J
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry; Ceramides/metabolism; Female; Gene Deletion; Gene Expression Regulation/physiology; Lung/*radiation effects; Lysophospholipids/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; *Radiation Injuries, Experimental; Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/genetics/metabolism; Sphingolipids/*metabolism; Sphingosine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1(-/-)) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1(+/-), S1PR2(-/-), and S1PR3(-/-)) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10371
      1. Author :
        Hanai, J.; Doro, N.; Sasaki, A. T.; Kobayashi, S.; Cantley, L. C.; Seth, P.; Sukhatme, V. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Cell Physiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        227
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, ATP Citrate (pro-S)-Lyase/*antagonists & inhibitors/genetics; Animals; Apoptosis; Cell Cycle; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Combined Modality Therapy; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition; Female; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Humans; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/*therapeutic use; Lung Neoplasms/*drug therapy/enzymology/pathology/*therapy; MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects; Mice; Mutation; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor/genetics; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        ATP citrate lyase (ACL) catalyzes the conversion of cytosolic citrate to acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate. A definitive role for ACL in tumorigenesis has emerged from ACL RNAi and chemical inhibitor studies, showing that ACL inhibition limits tumor cell proliferation and survival and induces differentiation in vitro. In vivo, it reduces tumor growth leading to a cytostatic effect and induces differentiation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood and agents that could enhance the efficacy of ACL inhibition have not been identified. Our studies focus on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines, which show phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation secondary to a mutation in the K-Ras gene or the EGFR gene. Here we show that ACL knockdown promotes apoptosis and differentiation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, in contrast to most studies, which elucidate how activation/suppression of signaling pathways can modify metabolism, we show that inhibition of a metabolic pathway “reverse signals” and attenuates PI3K/AKT signaling. Additionally, we find that statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which act downstream of ACL in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, dramatically enhance the anti-tumor effects of ACL inhibition, even regressing established tumors. With statin treatment, both PI3K/AKT and the MAPK pathways are affected. Moreover, this combined treatment is able to reduce the growth of EGF receptor resistant tumor cell types. Given the essential role of lipid synthesis in numerous cancers, this work may impact therapy in a broad range of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21688263
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10523
      1. Author :
        Hasenpusch, G.; Pfeifer, C.; Aneja, M. K.; Wagner, K.; Reinhardt, D.; Gilon, M.; Ohana, P.; Hochberg, A.; Rudolph, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Administration, Inhalation; Aerosols; Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics/*pathology/*secondary; Mice; Oncogenes/genetics; Plasmids/*administration & dosage/chemistry/*pharmacology; Polyethyleneimine/chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Despite numerous efforts, drug based treatments for patients suffering from lung cancer remains poor. As a promising alternative, we investigated the therapeutic potential of BC-819 for the treatment of lung cancer in mouse tumor models. BC-819 is a novel plasmid DNA which encodes for the A-fragment of Diphtheria toxin and has previously been shown to successfully inhibit tumor growth in human clinical study of bladder carcinoma. In a first set of experiments, we examined in vitro efficacy of BC-819 in human lung cancer cell-lines NCI-H460, NCI-H358 and A549, which revealed >90% reduction of cell growth. In vivo efficacy was examined in an orthotopic mouse xenograft lung cancer model and in a lung metastasis model using luminescent A549-C8-luc adenocarcinoma cells. These cells resulted in peri- and intra-bronchiolar tumors upon intrabronchial application and parenchymal tumors upon intravenous injection, respectively. Mice suffering from these lung tumors were treated with BC-819, complexed to branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and aerosolized to the mice once per week for a period of 10 weeks. Using this regimen, growth of intrabronchially induced lung tumors was significantly inhibited (p = 0.01), whereas no effect could be observed in mice suffering from lung metastasis. In summary, we suggest that aerosolized PEI/BC-819 is capable of reducing growth only in tumors arising from the luminal part of the airways and are therefore directly accessible for inhaled BC-819.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21687669
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10450
      1. Author :
        Bendaoud, M.; Vinogradov, E.; Balashova, N. V.; Kadouri, D. E.; Kachlany, S. C.; Kaplan, J. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Bacteriol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        193
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, IVISBacterial Physiological Phenomena/drug effects; Bacterial Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Biofilms/*drug effects; *Down-Regulation/drug effects; Fungi/drug effects/physiology; Kingella kingae/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism; Molecular Sequence Data; Polysaccharides, Bacterial/biosynthesis/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Cell-free extracts prepared from Kingella kingae colony biofilms were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans, and K. kingae. The extracts evidently inhibited biofilm formation by modifying the physicochemical properties of the cell surface, the biofilm matrix, and the substrate. Chemical and biochemical analyses indicated that the biofilm inhibition activity in the K. kingae extract was due to polysaccharide. Structural analyses showed that the extract contained two major polysaccharides. One was a linear polysaccharide with the structure -->6)-alpha-d-GlcNAcp-(1-->5)-beta-d-OclAp-(2-->, which was identical to a capsular polysaccharide produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. The second was a novel linear polysaccharide, designated PAM galactan, with the structure -->3)-beta-d-Galf-(1-->6)-beta-d-Galf-(1-->. Purified PAM galactan exhibited broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. A cluster of three K. kingae genes encoding UDP-galactopyranose mutase (ugm) and two putative galactofuranosyl transferases was sufficient for the synthesis of PAM galactan in Escherichia coli. PAM galactan is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit antibiofilm activity. The biological roles and potential technological applications of these molecules remain unknown.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21602333
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10446
      1. Author :
        Agarwal, A.; Mackey, M. A.; El-Sayed, M. A.; Bellamkonda, R. V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        ACS Nano
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        4919-26
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Annexin Vivo, Annexin-Vivo, IVIS, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/*administration & dosage; Apoptosis; Cell Line, Tumor; Doxorubicin/*administration & dosage; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Glioblastoma/drug therapy; Gold/chemistry; Humans; Liposomes/*chemistry; Metal Nanoparticles/chemistry; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanostructures/chemistry; Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Delivery of chemotherapeutic agents after encapsulation in nanocarriers such as liposomes diminishes side-effects, as PEGylated nanocarrier pharmacokinetics decrease dosing to healthy tissues and accumulate in tumors due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Once in the tumor, however, dosing of the chemotherapeutic to tumor cells is limited potentially by the rate of release from the carriers and the size-constrained, poor diffusivity of nanocarriers in tumor interstitium. Here, we report the design and fabrication of a thermosensitive liposomal nanocarrier that maintains its encapsulation stability with a high concentration of doxorubicin payload, thereby minimizing “leak” and attendant toxicity. When used synergistically with PEGylated gold nanorods and near-infrared stimulation, remote triggered release of doxorubicin from thermosensitive liposomes was achieved in a mouse tumor model of human glioblastoma (U87), resulting in a significant increase in efficacy when compared to nontriggered or nonthermosensitive PEGylated liposomes. This enhancement in efficacy is attributed to increase in tumor-site apoptosis, as was evident from noninvasive apoptosis imaging using Annexin-Vivo 750 probe. This strategy affords remotely triggered control of tumor dosing of nanocarrier-encapsulated doxorubicin without sacrificing the ability to differentially dose drugs to tumors via the enhanced permeation and retention effect.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21591812
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10430
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