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      1. Author :
        Rao, S. M.; Auger, J. L.; Gaillard, P.; Weissleder, R.; Wada, E.; Torres, R.; Kojima, M.; Benoist, C.; Mathis, D.; Binstadt, B. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Res Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Arthritis/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Autoantibodies/*immunology; Bone Marrow Cells/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Calcium/immunology/metabolism; Female; Male; Mast Cells/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Inbred NOD; Mice, Knockout; Mice, Transgenic; Neuropeptides/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Protein Isoforms/deficiency/genetics/immunology; Receptors, Neurotensin/deficiency/genetics/immunology; Receptors, Neurotransmitter/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Spleen/immunology/metabolism/pathology
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION: Neuromedin U (NMU) is a neuropeptide with pro-inflammatory activity. The primary goal of this study was to determine if NMU promotes autoantibody-induced arthritis. Additional studies addressed the cellular source of NMU and sought to define the NMU receptor responsible for its pro-inflammatory effects. METHODS: Serum containing arthritogenic autoantibodies from K/BxN mice was used to induce arthritis in mice genetically lacking NMU. Parallel experiments examined whether NMU deficiency impacted the early mast-cell-dependent vascular leak response induced by these autoantibodies. Bone-marrow chimeric mice were generated to determine whether pro-inflammatory NMU is derived from hematopoietic cells or stromal cells. Mice lacking the known NMU receptors singly and in combination were used to determine susceptibility to serum-transferred arthritis and in vitro cellular responses to NMU. RESULTS: NMU-deficient mice developed less severe arthritis than control mice. Vascular leak was not affected by NMU deficiency. NMU expression by bone-marrow-derived cells mediated the pro-arthritogenic effect. Deficiency of all of the known NMU receptors, however, had no impact on arthritis severity and did not affect the ability of NMU to stimulate intracellular calcium flux. CONCLUSIONS: NMU-deficient mice are protected from developing autoantibody-induced inflammatory arthritis. NMU derived from hematopoietic cells, not neurons, promotes the development of autoantibody-induced inflammatory arthritis. This effect is mediated by a receptor other than the currently known NMU receptors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22314006
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10438
      1. Author :
        Cortez-Retamozo, V.; Etzrodt, M.; Newton, A.; Rauch, P. J.; Chudnovskiy, A.; Berger, C.; Ryan, R. J.; Iwamoto, Y.; Marinelli, B.; Gorbatov, R.; Forghani, R.; Novobrantseva, T. I.; Koteliansky, V.; Figueiredo, J. L.; Chen, J. W.; Anderson, D. G.; Nahrendorf, M.; Swirski, F. K.; Weissleder, R.; Pittet, M. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        109
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Humans; Macrophages/*immunology; Mice; Neoplasms/immunology/*pathology; Neutrophils/*immunology; Spleen/immunology/pathology
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) can control cancer growth and exist in almost all solid neoplasms. The cells are known to descend from immature monocytic and granulocytic cells, respectively, which are produced in the bone marrow. However, the spleen is also a recently identified reservoir of monocytes, which can play a significant role in the inflammatory response that follows acute injury. Here, we evaluated the role of the splenic reservoir in a genetic mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma driven by activation of oncogenic Kras and inactivation of p53. We found that high numbers of TAM and TAN precursors physically relocated from the spleen to the tumor stroma, and that recruitment of tumor-promoting spleen-derived TAMs required signaling of the chemokine receptor CCR2. Also, removal of the spleen, either before or after tumor initiation, reduced TAM and TAN responses significantly and delayed tumor growth. The mechanism by which the spleen was able to maintain its reservoir capacity throughout tumor progression involved, in part, local accumulation in the splenic red pulp of typically rare extramedullary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, notably granulocyte and macrophage progenitors, which produced CD11b(+) Ly-6C(hi) monocytic and CD11b(+) Ly-6G(hi) granulocytic cells locally. Splenic granulocyte and macrophage progenitors and their descendants were likewise identified in clinical specimens. The present study sheds light on the origins of TAMs and TANs, and positions the spleen as an important extramedullary site, which can continuously supply growing tumors with these cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22308361
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 14
      15. Serial :
        10432
      1. Author :
        Cronin, M.; Akin, A. R.; Collins, S. A.; Meganck, J.; Kim, J. B.; Baban, C. K.; Joyce, S. A.; van Dam, G. M.; Zhang, N.; van Sinderen, D.; O'Sullivan, G. C.; Kasahara, N.; Gahan, C. G.; Francis, K. P.; Tangney, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Administration, Oral; Animals; Bacteria/*genetics; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Genes, Reporter/genetics; Genetic Engineering; Glioblastoma/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Luminescent Measurements/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Mice; Molecular Imaging/*methods; X-Ray Microtomography
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to track microbes in real time in vivo is of enormous value for preclinical investigations in infectious disease or gene therapy research. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumours following systemic administration. Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI) represents a powerful tool for use with bacteria engineered to express reporter genes such as lux. BLI is traditionally used as a 2D modality resulting in images that are limited in their ability to anatomically locate cell populations. Use of 3D diffuse optical tomography can localize the signals but still need to be combined with an anatomical imaging modality like micro-Computed Tomography (muCT) for interpretation.In this study, the non-pathogenic commensal bacteria E. coli K-12 MG1655 and Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003, or Salmonella Typhimurium SL7207 each expressing the luxABCDE operon were intravenously (i.v.) administered to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c) FLuc-expressing xenograft tumours. Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post i.v.-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. Through whole body imaging for both lux and FLuc, bacteria and tumour cells were co-localised. 3D BLI and muCT image analysis revealed a pattern of multiple clusters of bacteria within tumours. Investigation of spatial resolution of 3D optical imaging was supported by ex vivo histological analyses. In vivo imaging of orally-administered commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was also achieved using 3D BLI. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential to simultaneously image multiple BLI reporter genes three dimensionally in vivo using approaches that provide unique information on spatial locations.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22295120
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10496
      1. Author :
        Yan, J.; Meng, X.; Wancket, L. M.; Lintner, K.; Nelin, L. D.; Chen, B.; Francis, K. P.; Smith, C. V.; Rogers, L. K.; Liu, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        188
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Escherichia coli/immunology; Escherichia coli Infections/enzymology/immunology/*prevention & control; Extracellular Space/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Glutathione Reductase/deficiency/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Knockout; Neutrophils/*immunology/*metabolism/microbiology; Oxidative Stress/genetics/*immunology; Phagocytosis/genetics/*immunology; Staphylococcal Infections/enzymology/immunology/*prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Glutathione reductase (Gsr) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide to glutathione, which plays an important role in the bactericidal function of phagocytes. Because Gsr has been implicated in the oxidative burst in human neutrophils and is abundantly expressed in the lymphoid system, we hypothesized that Gsr-deficient mice would exhibit marked defects during the immune response against bacterial challenge. We report in this study that Gsr-null mice exhibited enhanced susceptibility to Escherichia coli challenge, indicated by dramatically increased bacterial burden, cytokine storm, striking histological abnormalities, and substantially elevated mortality. Additionally, Gsr-null mice exhibited elevated sensitivity to Staphylococcus aureus. Examination of the bactericidal functions of the neutrophils from Gsr-deficient mice in vitro revealed impaired phagocytosis and defective bacterial killing activities. Although Gsr catalyzes the regeneration of glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant, Gsr-deficient neutrophils paradoxically produced far less reactive oxygen species upon activation both ex vivo and in vivo. Unlike wild-type neutrophils that exhibited a sustained oxidative burst upon stimulation with phorbol ester and fMLP, Gsr-deficient neutrophils displayed a very transient oxidative burst that abruptly ceased shortly after stimulation. Likewise, Gsr-deficient neutrophils also exhibited an attenuated oxidative burst upon encountering E. coli. Biochemical analysis revealed that the hexose monophosphate shunt was compromised in Gsr-deficient neutrophils. Moreover, Gsr-deficient neutrophils displayed a marked impairment in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, a bactericidal mechanism that operates after neutrophil death. Thus, Gsr-mediated redox regulation is crucial for bacterial clearance during host defense against massive bacterial challenge.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22279102
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10398
      1. Author :
        Leong, H. S.; Lizardo, M. M.; Ablack, A.; McPherson, V. A.; Wandless, T. J.; Chambers, A. F.; Lewis, J. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, IVIS, Breast cancer, Bioware, Animals; Birds/embryology; Breast Neoplasms/*metabolism; Cadherins/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/drug effects; Female; Humans; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Morpholines/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology; Transplantation, Heterologous; Vimentin/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The analysis of dynamic events in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression is limited by the complexity of current in vivo imaging models. This is coupled with an inability to rapidly modulate and visualize protein activity in real time and to understand the consequence of these perturbations in vivo. We developed an intravital imaging approach that allows the rapid induction and subsequent depletion of target protein levels within human cancer xenografts while assessing the impact on cell behavior and morphology in real time. A conditionally stabilized fluorescent E-cadherin chimera was expressed in metastatic breast cancer cells, and the impact of E-cadherin induction and depletion was visualized using real-time confocal microscopy in a xenograft avian embryo model. We demonstrate the assessment of protein localization, cell morphology and migration in cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions in breast tumors. This technique allows for precise control over protein activity in vivo while permitting the temporal analysis of dynamic biophysical parameters.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22276156
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10508
      1. Author :
        Derwall, M.; Malhotra, R.; Lai, C. S.; Beppu, Y.; Aikawa, E.; Seehra, J. S.; Zapol, W. M.; Bloch, K. D.; Yu, P. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology; Antioxidants/pharmacology; Atherosclerosis/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention & control; Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type I/metabolism; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Cardiovascular Agents/*pharmacology; Cholesterol, LDL/blood; Diet, High-Fat; Disease Models, Animal; Endothelial Cells/drug effects/metabolism; Fatty Liver/etiology/metabolism/prevention & control; Female; Hep G2 Cells; Humans; Lipoproteins, LDL/metabolism; Liver/drug effects/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Pyrazoles/*pharmacology; Pyrimidines/*pharmacology; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Receptors, LDL/deficiency/genetics; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism; Signal Transduction/*drug effects; Time Factors; Vascular Calcification/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention &; control
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is enhanced in human atherosclerotic and calcific vascular lesions. Although genetic gain- and loss-of-function experiments in mice have supported a causal role of BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and vascular calcification, it remains uncertain whether BMP signaling might be targeted pharmacologically to ameliorate both of these processes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We tested the impact of pharmacological BMP inhibition on atherosclerosis and calcification in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice. LDLR-/- mice fed a high-fat diet developed abundant vascular calcification within 20 weeks. Prolonged treatment of LDLR-/- mice with the small molecule BMP inhibitor LDN-193189 was well-tolerated and potently inhibited development of atheroma, as well as associated vascular inflammation, osteogenic activity, and calcification. Administration of recombinant BMP antagonist ALK3-Fc replicated the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of LDN-193189. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells with LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc abrogated the production of reactive oxygen species induced by oxidized LDL, a known early event in atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, treatment of mice with LDN-193189 lowered LDL serum cholesterol by 35% and markedly decreased hepatosteatosis without inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase activity. Treatment with BMP2 increased, whereas LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc inhibited apolipoprotein B100 secretion in HepG2 cells, suggesting that BMP signaling contributes to the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. CONCLUSION: These results definitively implicate BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and calcification, while uncovering a previously unidentified role for BMP signaling in LDL cholesterol metabolism. BMP inhibition may be helpful in the treatment of atherosclerosis and associated vascular calcification.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22223731
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10469
      1. Author :
        Leuschner, F.; Rauch, P. J.; Ueno, T.; Gorbatov, R.; Marinelli, B.; Lee, W. W.; Dutta, P.; Wei, Y.; Robbins, C.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sena, B.; Chudnovskiy, A.; Panizzi, P.; Keliher, E.; Higgins, J. M.; Libby, P.; Moskowitz, M. A.; Pittet, M. J.; Swirski, F. K.; Weissleder, R.; Nahrendorf, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Exp Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        209
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Adoptive Transfer; Animals; Biological Markers/metabolism; Cell Death/genetics; Disease Models, Animal; Female; *Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary; Inflammation/immunology/metabolism; Interleukin-1beta/genetics/metabolism; Kinetics; Macrophages/cytology/*physiology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Models, Biological; Monocytes/*cytology/*physiology; Myeloid Cells/metabolism; Myocardial Infarction/immunology/pathology/*physiopathology; Signal Transduction; Spleen/physiology; Stroke/immunology/metabolism; Wound Healing/physiology
      12. Abstract :
        Monocytes (Mo) and macrophages (MPhi) are emerging therapeutic targets in malignant, cardiovascular, and autoimmune disorders. Targeting of Mo/MPhi and their effector functions without compromising innate immunity's critical defense mechanisms first requires addressing gaps in knowledge about the life cycle of these cells. Here we studied the source, tissue kinetics, and clearance of Mo/MPhi in murine myocardial infarction, a model of acute inflammation after ischemic injury. We found that a) Mo tissue residence time was surprisingly short (20 h); b) Mo recruitment rates were consistently high even days after initiation of inflammation; c) the sustained need of newly made Mo was fostered by extramedullary monocytopoiesis in the spleen; d) splenic monocytopoiesis was regulated by IL-1beta; and e) the balance of cell recruitment and local death shifted during resolution of inflammation. Depending on the experimental approach, we measured a 24 h Mo/MPhi exit rate from infarct tissue between 5 and 13% of the tissue cell population. Exited cells were most numerous in the blood, liver, and spleen. Abrogation of extramedullary monocytopoiesis proved deleterious for infarct healing and accelerated the evolution of heart failure. We also detected rapid Mo kinetics in mice with stroke. These findings expand our knowledge of Mo/MPhi flux in acute inflammation and provide the groundwork for novel anti-inflammatory strategies for treating heart failure.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22213805
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 27
      15. Serial :
        10370
      1. Author :
        Reppert, S.; Boross, I.; Koslowski, M.; Tureci, O.; Koch, S.; Lehr, H. A.; Finotto, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Nat Commun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        LL/2-luc-M38, LL/2-luc, Lewis Lung Carcinoma, IVIS, Adenocarcinoma/drug therapy/genetics/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Administration, Intranasal; Adult; Aged; Animals; Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage/*therapeutic use; Antigens, CD/immunology; Female; Forkhead Transcription Factors/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/drug effects/*immunology; Humans; Immunologic Surveillance; Interferon-gamma/biosynthesis/immunology; Interleukin-17/immunology/metabolism; Interleukin-23/immunology/metabolism; Lung/drug effects/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Middle Aged; T-Box Domain Proteins/deficiency/*genetics/immunology; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The cytokine interleukin-17A supports tumour vascularization and growth, however, its role in lung cancer is unknown. Here we show, in the lungs of patients with lung adenocarcinoma, an increase in interleukin-17A that is inversely correlated with the expression of T-bet and correlated with the T regulatory cell transcription factor Foxp3. Local targeting of interleukin-17A in experimental lung adenocarcinoma results in a reduction in tumour load, local expansion of interferon-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells and a reduction in lung CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. T-bet((-/-)) mice have a significantly higher tumour load compared with wild-type mice. This is associated with the local upregulation of interleukin-23 and induction of interleukin-17A/interleukin-17R-expressing T cells infiltrating the tumour. Local anti-interleukin-17A antibody treatment partially improves the survival of T-bet((-/-)) mice. These results suggest that local anti-interleukin-17A antibody therapy could be considered for the treatment of lung tumours.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22186896
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10544
      1. Author :
        Johnson, J. L.; Pillai, S.; Pernazza, D.; Sebti, S. M.; Lawrence, N. J.; Chellappan, S. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; E2F Transcription Factors/*genetics/metabolism; Enzyme Assays/methods; Female; Gelatin/metabolism; *Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic; *Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Humans; Lung Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Matrix Metalloproteinases/biosynthesis/*genetics/metabolism; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neoplasm Metastasis; Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Protein/*metabolism; Retinoblastoma Protein/genetics/*metabolism; Transcription, Genetic; Transfection
      12. Abstract :
        The retinoblastoma (Rb)-E2F transcriptional regulatory pathway plays a major role in cell-cycle regulation, but its role in invasion and metastasis is less well understood. We find that many genes involved in the invasion of cancer cells, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), have potential E2F-binding sites in their promoters. E2F-binding sites were predicted on all 23 human MMP gene promoters, many of which harbored multiple E2F-binding sites. Studies presented here show that MMP genes such as MMP9, MMP14, and MMP15 which are overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer, have multiple E2F-binding sites and are regulated by the Rb-E2F pathway. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed the association of E2F1 with the MMP9, MMP14, and MMP15 promoters, and transient transfection experiments showed that these promoters are E2F responsive. Correspondingly, depletion of E2F family members by RNA interference techniques reduced the expression of these genes with a corresponding reduction in collagen degradation activity. Furthermore, activating Rb by inhibiting the interaction of Raf-1 with Rb by using the Rb-Raf-1 disruptor RRD-251 was sufficient to inhibit MMP transcription. This led to reduced invasion and migration of cancer cells in vitro and metastatic foci development in a tail vein lung metastasis model in mice. These results suggest that E2F transcription factors may play a role in promoting metastasis through regulation of MMP genes and that targeting the Rb-Raf-1 interaction is a promising approach for the treatment of metastatic disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22086850
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10525
      1. Author :
        Tekabe, Y.; Klose, A.; Nizami, S.; Luma, J.; Lee, F. Y.; Johnson, L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Biophotonics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, CD31/metabolism; Capillaries/metabolism; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Femoral Artery/surgery; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use/metabolism; Hindlimb/*blood supply/metabolism/pathology; Integrin alphaV/metabolism; Integrin alphaVbeta3/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Ischemia/*pathology; Ligation; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Microscopy, Fluorescence; *Neovascularization, Physiologic; Plant Lectins/metabolism; Sensitivity and Specificity
      12. Abstract :
        Optical agents targeting alpha(v)beta(3) are potential tools to image the angiogenic response to limb ischemia. The left (L) femoral artery was ligated in 17 mice and sham surgery performed on the contralateral right (R) hindlimb. Seven days later, IntegriSense (2 nmol) was injected into 11 mice and 6 were probe controls. Six hours later, mice underwent optical imaging. Ratios of photon flux in the L/R limbs were calculated. Tissue was stained for alpha(v) , CD31, and lectin. The signal was increased in the ischemic limbs compared to contralateral legs and ratio of photon flux in L/R limb averaged 2.37. Control probe showed no hindlimb signal. IntegriSense colocalized with CD31 by dual fluorescent staining. Ratios for L/R hindlimbs correlated with quantitative lectin staining (r = 0.88, p = 0.003). Optical imaging can identify and quantify angiogenic response to hindlimb ischemia.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22031282
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10380
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