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      1. Author :
        Kozlowski, C.; Weimer, R. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Antigens, CD/metabolism; Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism; Calcium-Binding Proteins/metabolism; Central Nervous System/metabolism; Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Immunohistochemistry/*methods; Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Microfilament Proteins/metabolism; Microglia/cytology/drug effects/*metabolism; Microscopy, Confocal/*methods; Receptors, Cytokine/genetics/metabolism; Receptors, HIV/genetics/metabolism; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        Microglia are specialized immune cells of the brain. Upon insult, microglia initiate a cascade of cellular responses including a characteristic change in cell morphology. To study the dynamics of microglia immune response in situ, we developed an automated image analysis method that enables the quantitative assessment of microglia activation state within tissue based solely on cell morphology. Per cell morphometric analysis of fluorescently labeled microglia is achieved through local iterative threshold segmentation, which reduces errors caused by signal-to-noise variation across large volumes. We demonstrate, utilizing systemic application of lipopolysaccharide as a model of immune challenge, that several morphological parameters, including cell perimeter length, cell roundness and soma size, quantitatively distinguish resting versus activated populations of microglia within tissue comparable to traditional immunohistochemistry methods. Furthermore, we provide proof-of-concept data that monitoring soma size enables the longitudinal assessment of microglia activation in the mouse neocortex imaged via 2-photon in vivo microscopy. The ability to quantify microglia activation automatically by shape alone allows unbiased and rapid analysis of both fixed and in vivo central nervous system tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22457705
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10435
      1. Author :
        Phillips, W. T.; Goins, B.; Bao, A.; Vargas, D.; Guttierez, J. E.; Trevino, A.; Miller, J. R.; Henry, J.; Zuniga, R.; Vecil, G.; Brenner, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neuro Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        416-25
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U-87 MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, Glioma, Bioware, IVIS, Animals; Brachytherapy/*methods; Brain Neoplasms/pathology/*radiotherapy; Convection; Glioblastoma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Glioma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Liposomes; Nanoparticles/therapeutic use; Radioisotopes/*therapeutic use; Rats; Rhenium/*therapeutic use; Tumor Burden; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Although external beam radiation is an essential component to the current standard treatment of primary brain tumors, its application is limited by toxicity at doses more than 80 Gy. Recent studies have suggested that brachytherapy with liposomally encapsulated radionuclides may be of benefit, and we have reported methods to markedly increase the specific activity of rhenium-186 ((186)Re)-liposomes. To better characterize the potential delivery, toxicity, and efficacy of the highly specific activity of (186)Re-liposomes, we evaluated their intracranial application by convection-enhanced delivery in an orthotopic U87 glioma rat model. After establishing an optimal volume of 25 microL, we observed focal activity confined to the site of injection over a 96-hour period. Doses of up to 1850 Gy were administered without overt clinical or microscopic evidence of toxicity. Animals treated with (186)Re-liposomes had a median survival of 126 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.4-173 days), compared with 49 days (95% CI, 44-53 days) for controls. Log-rank analysis between these 2 groups was highly significant (P = .0013) and was even higher when 100 Gy was used as a cutoff (P < .0001). Noninvasive luciferase imaging as a surrogate for tumor volume showed a statistically significant separation in bioluminescence by 11 days after 100 Gy or less treatment between the experimental group and the control animals (chi(2)[1, N= 19] = 4.8; P = .029). MRI also supported this difference in tumor size. Duplication of tumor volume differences and survival benefit was possible in a more invasive U251 orthotopic model, with clear separation in bioluminescence at 6 days after treatment (chi(2)[1, N= 9] = 4.7; P = .029); median survival in treated animals was not reached at 120 days because lack of mortality, and log-rank analysis of survival was highly significant (P = .0057). Analysis of tumors by histology revealed minimal areas of necrosis and gliosis. These results support the potential efficacy of the highly specific activity of brachytherapy by (186)Re-liposomes convection-enhanced delivery in glioma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22427110
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10500
      1. Author :
        Ru, P.; Steele, R.; Newhall, P.; Phillips, N. J.; Toth, K.; Ray, R. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Cancer Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        11
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. Early diagnosis increases survival rate in patients; however, treatments for advanced disease are limited to hormone ablation techniques and palliative care. Thus, new methods of treatment are necessary for inhibiting prostate cancer disease progression. Here, we have shown that miRNA-29b (miR-29b) expression was lower in prostate cancer cells (PC3 and LNCaP) as compared with immortalized prostate epithelial cells. Between these two prostate cancer cell lines, metastatic prostate cancer PC3 cells displayed lower expression of miR-29b. We also observed a significant downregulation of miR-29b expression in human prostate cancer tissues as compared with patient-matched nontumor tissues. PC3 cells ectopically expressing miR-29b inhibited wound healing, invasiveness, and failed to colonize in the lungs and liver of severe combined immunodeficient mice after intravenous injection, while PC3 cells expressing a control miRNA displayed metastasis. Epithelial cell marker E-cadherin expression was enhanced miR-29b transfected in prostate cancer cells as compared with cells expressing control miRNA. On the other hand, N-cadherin, Twist, and Snail expression was downregulated in PC3 cells expressing miR-29b. Together these results suggested that miR-29b acts as an antimetastatic miRNA for prostate cancer cells at multiple steps in a metastatic cascade. Therefore, miR-29b could be a potentially new attractive target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22402125
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10539
      1. Author :
        Xiao, K.; Li, Y.; Lee, J. S.; Gonik, A. M.; Dong, T.; Fung, G.; Sanchez, E.; Xing, L.; Cheng, H. R.; Luo, J.; Lam, K. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        SKOV3-luc-D3, SKOV3-luc, IVIS, Ovarian Cancer, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/*administration & dosage; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/therapeutic use; Drug Delivery Systems/*methods; Female; Flow Cytometry; Humans; Integrin alpha Chains/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Nude; Micelles; Microscopy, Confocal; Nanoparticles/chemistry/therapeutic use; Ovarian Neoplasms/*drug therapy; Paclitaxel/*administration & dosage; Peptides/chemical synthesis/therapeutic use; Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Micellar nanoparticles based on linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) block dendritic cholic acids (CA) copolymers (telodendrimers), for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of cancers, are reported. The micellar nanoparticles have been decorated with a high-affinity “OA02” peptide against alpha-3 integrin receptor to improve the tumor-targeting specificity which is overexpressed on the surface of ovarian cancer cells. “Click chemistry” was used to conjugate alkyne-containing OA02 peptide to the azide group at the distal terminus of the PEG chain in a representative PEG(5k)-CA(8) telodendrimer (micelle-forming unit). The conjugation of OA02 peptide had negligible influence on the physicochemical properties of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles and as hypothesized, OA02 peptide dramatically enhanced the uptake efficiency of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles (NP) in SKOV-3 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, but not in alpha-3 integrin-negative K562 leukemia cells. When loaded with paclitaxel, OA02-NPs had significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity against both SKOV-3 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells as compared with nontargeted nanoparticles. Furthermore, the in vivo biodistribution study showed OA02 peptide greatly facilitated tumor localization and the intracellular uptake of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles into ovarian cancer cells as validated in SKOV3-luc tumor-bearing mice. Finally, paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded OA02-NPs exhibited superior antitumor efficacy and lower systemic toxicity profile in nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumor xenografts, when compared with equivalent doses of nontargeted PTX-NPs as well as clinical paclitaxel formulation (Taxol). Therefore, OA02-targeted telodendrimers loaded with paclitaxel have great potential as a new therapeutic approach for patients with ovarian cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22396491
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10543
      1. Author :
        Guo, K.; Tang, J. P.; Jie, L.; Al-Aidaroos, A. Q.; Hong, C. W.; Tan, C. P.; Park, J. E.; Varghese, L.; Feng, Z.; Zhou, J.; Chng, W. J.; Zeng, Q.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncotarget
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal/*immunology; Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/drug therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy; Humans; Immediate-Early Proteins/*immunology; Killer Cells, Natural/*immunology; Lymphocyte Activation/immunology; Melanoma/drug therapy; Mice; Mice, Nude; Mice, SCID; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods; Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/*immunology; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/immunology/pharmacology/therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        Antibodies are considered as 'magic bullets' because of their high specificity. It is believed that antibodies are too large to routinely enter the cytosol, thus antibody therapeutic approach has been limited to extracellular or secreted proteins expressed by cancer cells. However, many oncogenic proteins are localized within the cell. To explore the possibility of antibody therapies against intracellular targets, we generated a chimeric antibody targeting the intracellular PRL-3 oncoprotein to assess its antitumor activities in mice. Remarkably, we observed that the PRL-3 chimeric antibody could efficiently and specifically reduce the formation of PRL-3 expressing metastatic tumors. We further found that natural killer (NK) cells were important in mediating the therapeutic effect, which was only observed in a nude mouse model (T-cell deficient), but not in a Severe Combined Immunodeficiency' (scid ) mouse model (B- and T-cell deficient), indicating the anticancer effect also depends on host B-cell activity. Our study involving 377 nude and scid mice suggest that antibodies targeting intracellular proteins can be developed to treat cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22374986
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10497
      1. Author :
        Correa de Sampaio, P.; Auslaender, D.; Krubasik, D.; Failla, A. V.; Skepper, J. N.; Murphy, G.; English, W. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware, Angiogenesis Inhibitors/pharmacology; *Cell Communication/drug effects; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Extracellular Matrix/drug effects/metabolism; Fibroblasts/drug effects/metabolism/pathology; Gene Silencing/drug effects; Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/drug effects/metabolism; Humans; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/pharmacology; Luminescent Measurements; Matrix Metalloproteinase 14/metabolism; Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton; *Models, Biological; Neoplasms/*blood supply/enzymology/*pathology; Neovascularization, Pathologic/*pathology; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Spheroids, Cellular/drug effects/enzymology/pathology; Stromal Cells/drug effects/pathology; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is an essential process for tumour progression and is an area of significant therapeutic interest. Different in vitro systems and more complex in vivo systems have been described for the study of tumour angiogenesis. However, there are few human 3D in vitro systems described to date which mimic the cellular heterogeneity and complexity of angiogenesis within the tumour microenvironment. In this study we describe the Minitumour model--a 3 dimensional human spheroid-based system consisting of endothelial cells and fibroblasts in co-culture with the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, for the study of tumour angiogenesis in vitro. After implantation in collagen-I gels, Minitumour spheroids form quantifiable endothelial capillary-like structures. The endothelial cell pre-capillary sprouts are supported by the fibroblasts, which act as mural cells, and their growth is increased by the presence of cancer cells. Characterisation of the Minitumour model using small molecule inhibitors and inhibitory antibodies show that endothelial sprout formation is dependent on growth factors and cytokines known to be important for tumour angiogenesis. The model also shows a response to anti-angiogenic agents similar to previously described in vivo data. We demonstrate that independent manipulation of the different cell types is possible, using common molecular techniques, before incorporation into the model. This aspect of Minitumour spheroid analysis makes this model ideal for high content studies of gene function in individual cell types, allowing for the dissection of their roles in cell-cell interactions. Finally, using this technique, we were able to show the requirement of the metalloproteinase MT1-MMP in endothelial cells and fibroblasts, but not cancer cells, for sprouting angiogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22363483
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10492
      1. Author :
        Wang, M.; Gartel, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Biol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, IVIS, Breast cancer, Bioware, Adenocarcinoma/*drug therapy/pathology; Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy; Protocols/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Apoptosis; Boronic Acids/administration & dosage; Breast Neoplasms/*drug therapy/pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Synergism; Female; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Nanocapsules/administration & dosage; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism; Pyrazines/administration & dosage; Random Allocation; Thiostrepton/administration & dosage; Tissue Distribution; Tumor Burden/drug effects; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Bortezomib is well-known for inducing cell death in cancer cells, specifically through the mechanism of proteasome inhibition. Thiostrepton, a thiazole antibiotic, has also been described for its proteasome inhibitory action, although differing slightly to bortezomib in the proteasomal site to which it is active. Previously we had shown the synergic effect of bortezomib and thiostrepton in breast cancer cells in vitro, where sub-apoptotic concentrations of both proteasome inhibitors resulted in synergic increase in cell death when combined as a treatment. Here, we administered such a combination to MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors in vivo, and found that the effect of complementary proteasome inhibitors reduced tumor growth rates more efficiently than compared with when administered alone. Increased induction of apoptotic activity in tumors was found be associated with the growth inhibitory activity of combination treatment. Further examination additionally revealed that combination-treated tumors exhibited reduced proteasome activity, compared with non-treated and single drug-treated tumors. These data suggest that this drug combination may be useful as a therapy for solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22353937
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10510
      1. Author :
        Xie, B. W.; Mol, I. M.; Keereweer, S.; van Beek, E. R.; Que, I.; Snoeks, T. J.; Chan, A.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, ProSense, MMPSense, CRi, Maestro, IVIS Animals; Benzenesulfonates/diagnostic use; Diagnostic Imaging/instrumentation/*methods; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Indoles/diagnostic use; Luminescent Measurements/instrumentation/*methods; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis/pathology; Mice
      12. Abstract :
        Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has shown its appeal as a sensitive technique for in vivo whole body optical imaging. However, the development of injectable tumor-specific near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) probes makes fluorescence imaging (FLI) a promising alternative to BLI in situations where BLI cannot be used or is unwanted (e.g., spontaneous transgenic tumor models, or syngeneic mice to study immune effects).In this study, we addressed the questions whether it is possible to detect tumor progression using FLI with appropriate sensitivity and how FLI correlates with BLI measurements. In addition, we explored the possibility to simultaneously detect multiple tumor characteristics by dual-wavelength FLI (~700 and ~800 nm) in combination with spectral unmixing. Using a luciferase-expressing 4T1-luc2 mouse breast cancer model and combinations of activatable and targeting NIRF probes, we showed that the activatable NIRF probes (ProSense680 and MMPSense680) and the targeting NIRF probes (IRDye 800CW 2-DG and IRDye 800CW EGF) were either activated by or bound to 4T1-luc2 cells. In vivo, we implanted 4T1-luc2 cells orthotopically in nude mice and were able to follow tumor progression longitudinally both by BLI and dual-wavelength FLI. We were able to reveal different probe signals within the tumor, which co-localized with immuno-staining. Moreover, we observed a linear correlation between the internal BLI signals and the FLI signals obtained from the NIRF probes. Finally, we could detect pulmonary metastases both by BLI and FLI and confirmed their presence histologically.Taken together, these data suggest that dual-wavelength FLI is a feasible approach to simultaneously detect different features of one tumor and to follow tumor progression with appropriate specificity and sensitivity. This study may open up new perspectives for the detection of tumors and metastases in various experimental models and could also have clinical applications, such as image-guided surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22348134
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10426
      1. Author :
        Wensman, H.; Kamgari, N.; Johansson, A.; Grujic, M.; Calounova, G.; Lundequist, A.; Ronnberg, E.; Pejler, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        LL/2-luc-M38, LL/2-luc, Lewis Lung Carcinoma, IVIS, Animals; Antigens, CD137/genetics/*immunology; Carcinoma, Lewis Lung/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics/*immunology; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Mast Cells/*immunology/metabolism; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Up-Regulation
      12. Abstract :
        Mast cells (MCs) can have either detrimental or beneficial effects on malignant processes but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by examining the interaction between Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cells and MCs. In vivo, LLC tumors caused a profound accumulation of MCs, suggesting that LLC tumors have the capacity to attract MCs. Indeed, transwell migration assays showed that LLC-conditioned medium had chemotactic activity towards MCs, which was blocked by an antibody towards stem cell factor. In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms operative in tumor-MC interactions, the effect of LLC on the MC gene expression pattern was examined. As judged by gene array analysis, conditioned medium from LLC cells caused significant upregulation of numerous cell surface receptors and a pro-angiogenic Runx2/VEGF/Dusp5 axis in MCs, the latter in line with a role for MCs in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Among the genes showing the highest extent of upregulation was Tnfrsf9, encoding the anti-tumorigenic protein 4-1BB, suggesting that also anti-tumorigenic factors are induced. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that 4-1BB was upregulated in a transient manner, and it was also shown that tumor cells induce 4-1BB in human MCs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LLC-conditioned medium induced 4-1BB also at the protein level. Together, this study provides novel insight into the molecular events associated with MC-tumor interactions and suggests that tumor cells induce both pro- and anti-tumorigenic responses in MCs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22343053
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10546
      1. Author :
        Nowatzki, P. J.; Koepsel, R. R.; Stoodley, P.; Min, K.; Harper, A.; Murata, H.; Donfack, J.; Hortelano, E. R.; Ehrlich, G. D.; Russell, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Acta Biomater
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilm-associated infections are a major complication of implanted and indwelling medical devices like urological and venous catheters. They commonly persist even in the presence of an oral or intravenous antibiotic regimen, often resulting in chronic illness. We have developed a new approach to inhibiting biofilm growth on synthetic materials through controlled release of salicylic acid from a polymeric coating. Herein we report the synthesis and testing of a ultraviolet-cured polyurethane acrylate polymer composed, in part, of salicyl acrylate, which hydrolyzes upon exposure to aqueous conditions, releasing salicylic acid while leaving the polymer backbone intact. The salicylic acid release rate was tuned by adjusting the polymer composition. Anti-biofilm performance of the coatings was assessed under several biofilm forming conditions using a novel combination of the MBEC Assay biofilm multi-peg growth system and bioluminescence monitoring for live cell quantification. Films of the salicylic acid-releasing polymers were found to inhibit biofilm formation, as shown by bioluminescent and GFP reporter strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Urinary catheters coated on their inner lumens with the salicylic acid-releasing polymer significantly reduced biofilm formation by E. coli for up to 5 days under conditions that simulated physiological urine flow.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22342353
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10394
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