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      1. Author :
        Chauhan, A.; Lebeaux, D.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilms that develop on indwelling devices are a major concern in clinical settings. While removal of colonized devices remains the most frequent strategy for avoiding device-related complications, antibiotic lock therapy constitutes an adjunct therapy for catheter-related infection. However, currently used antibiotic lock solutions are not fully effective against biofilms, thus warranting a search for new antibiotic locks. Metal-binding chelators have emerged as potential adjuvants due to their dual anticoagulant/antibiofilm activities, but studies investigating their efficiency were mainly in vitro or else focused on their effects in prevention of infection. To assess the ability of such chelators to eradicate mature biofilms, we used an in vivo model of a totally implantable venous access port inserted in rats and colonized by either Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that use of tetrasodium EDTA (30 mg/ml) as a supplement to the gentamicin (5 mg/ml) antibiotic lock solution associated with systemic antibiotics completely eradicated Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms developed in totally implantable venous access ports. Gentamicin-EDTA lock was able to eliminate biofilms with a single instillation, thus reducing length of treatment. Moreover, we show that this combination was effective for immunosuppressed rats. Lastly, we demonstrate that a gentamicin-EDTA lock is able to eradicate the biofilm formed by a gentamicin-resistant strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This in vivo study demonstrates the potential of EDTA as an efficient antibiotic adjuvant to eradicate catheter-associated biofilms of major bacterial pathogens and thus provides a promising new lock solution.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23027191
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10552
      1. Author :
        Lee, S.; Vinegoni, C.; Feruglio, P. F.; Fexon, L.; Gorbatov, R.; Pivoravov, M.; Sbarbati, A.; Nahrendorf, M.; Weissleder, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Commun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Real-time imaging of moving organs and tissues at microscopic resolutions represents a major challenge in studying the complex biology of live animals. Here we present a technique based on a novel stabilizer setup combined with a gating acquisition algorithm for the imaging of a beating murine heart at the single-cell level. The method allows serial in vivo fluorescence imaging of the beating heart in live mice in both confocal and nonlinear modes over the course of several hours. We demonstrate the utility of this technique for in vivo optical sectioning and dual-channel time-lapse fluorescence imaging of cardiac ischaemia. The generic method could be adapted to other moving organs and thus broadly facilitate in vivo microscopic investigations.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22968700
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10436
      1. Author :
        Domanska, U. M.; Timmer-Bosscha, H.; Nagengast, W. B.; Oude Munnink, T. H.; Kruizinga, R. C.; Ananias, H. J.; Kliphuis, N. M.; Huls, G.; De Vries, E. G.; de Jong, I. J.; Walenkamp, A. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        709-18
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3-luc2, Prostate Cancer, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Several in vitro and in vivo models have revealed the key role of CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in tumor-stroma interactions. Stromal cells present in the tumor microenvironment express high levels of CXCL12 protein, directly stimulating proliferation and migration of CXCR4-expressing cancer cells. This specific prosurvival influence of stromal cells on tumor cells is thought to protect them from cytotoxic chemotherapy and is postulated as a possible explanation for the minimal residual disease in hematological and solid cancers. Therefore, CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling is an attractive therapeutic target in cancer, as proven in preclinical leukemia mouse models, where CXCR4 inhibition sensitized cancer cells to conventional chemotherapy. This study investigates whether inhibition of CXCR4 with the specific inhibitor AMD3100 sensitizes human prostate cancer cells to docetaxel. We showed that both mouse and human stromal cell lines have a protective effect on PC3-luc cells by promoting their survival after chemotherapy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AMD3100 sensitizes PC3-luc cells to docetaxel. In a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of human prostate carcinoma, we showed that a combination of docetaxel and AMD3100 exerts increased antitumor effect compared with docetaxel alone. We concluded that CXCR4 inhibition chemosensitizes prostate cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. To explore the relevance of these findings, we analyzed CXCR4 expression levels in human prostate cancer samples. We found that cancer cells present in bone metastatic lesions express higher CXCR4 levels relative to the cells present in primary tumors and lymph node metastatic lesions. These findings underscore the potential of CXCR4 inhibitors as chemosensitizing agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952424
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10507
      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; Bshena, O.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Biomacromolecules
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
      12. Abstract :
        The ability of brominated furanones and other furanone compounds with 2(3H) and 2(5H) cores to inhibit bacterial adhesion of surfaces as well deactivate (destroy) them has been previously reported. The furanone derivatives 4-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone and 5-(2-(2-aminoethoxy)-ethoxy)methyl)-2(5H)-furanone were synthesized in our laboratory. These furanone derivatives were then covalently immobilized onto poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) (SMA) and electrospun to fabricate nonwoven nanofibrous mats with antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties. The electrospun nanofibrous mats were tested for their ability to inhibit cell attachment by strains of bacteria commonly found in water ( Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5, and Salmonella tymphimurium Xen 26). Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR), electrospray mass spectroscopy (ES-MS), and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to confirm the structures of the synthesized furanones as well as their successful immobilization on SMA. To ascertain that the immobilized furanone compounds do not leach into filtered water, samples of water, filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The morphology of the electrospun nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22947312
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10550
      1. Author :
        Rocks, N.; Bekaert, S.; Coia, I.; Paulissen, G.; Gueders, M.; Evrard, B.; Van Heugen, J. C.; Chiap, P.; Foidart, J. M.; Noel, A.; Cataldo, D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Br J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        107
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        LL/2-luc-M38, LL/2-luc, Lewis Lung Carcinoma, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Overall clinical outcome for advanced lung cancer remains very disappointing despite recent advances in treatment. Curcumin has been reported as potentially active against cancer. METHODS: Owing to poor curcumin solubility, we have used cyclodextrins (CD) as an excipient allowing a considerable increase of aqueous solubility and bioavailability of curcumin. The effects of solubilised curcumin have been evaluated in cell cultures as well as in an in vivo orthotopic lung tumour mouse model. RESULTS: Cell proliferation was reduced while apoptosis rates were increased when lung epithelial tumour cells were cultured in the presence of curcumin-CD complexes. For in vivo experiments, cells were grafted into lungs of C57Bl/6 mice treated by an oral administration of a non-soluble form of curcumin, CDs alone or curcumin-CD complexes, combined or not with gemcitabine. The size of orthotopically implanted lung tumours was reduced upon curcumin complex administration as compared with treatments with placebo or non-solubilised curcumin. Moreover, curcumin potentiated the gemcitabine-mediated antitumour effects. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that curcumin, when given orally in a CD-solubilised form, reduces lung tumour size in vivo. In vitro experiments show impaired tumour cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. Moreover, our data underline a potential additive effect of curcumin with gemcitabine thus providing an efficient therapeutic option for antilung cancer therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22929882
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10545
      1. Author :
        Liao, A. H.; Li, Y. K.; Lee, W. J.; Wu, M. F.; Liu, H. L.; Kuo, M. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Ultrasound Med Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        The application of drug-loaded microbubbles (MBs) in combination with ultrasound (US), which results in an increase in capillary permeability at the site of US-sonication-induced MB destruction, may be an efficient method of localized drug delivery. This study investigated the mechanism underlying the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs through the blood vessels to targeted cells using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) system. The luciferin-loaded MBs comprised an albumin shell with a diameter of 1234 +/- 394 nm (mean +/- SD) and contained 2.48 x 10(9) bubbles/mL; within each MB, the concentration of encapsulated luciferin was 1.48 x 10(-)(1)(0) mg/bubble. The loading efficiency of luciferin in MBs was only about 19.8%, while maintaining both the bioluminescence and acoustic properties. In vitro and in vivo BLI experiments were performed to evaluate the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs. For in vitro results, the increase in light emission of luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs after destruction via US sonication (6.24 +/- 0.72 x 10(7) photons/s) was significantly higher than that in the luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs (3.11 +/- 0.33 x 10(7) photons/s) (p < 0.05). The efficiency of the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs in 4T1-luc2 tumor-bearing mice was also estimated. The signal intensity of the tumor with US destruction at 3 W/cm(2) for 30 s was significantly higher than without US destruction at 3 (p = 0.025), 5 (p = 0.013), 7 (p = 0.012) and 10 (p = 0.032) min after injecting luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs. The delivery efficiency was, thus, improved with US-mediated release, allowing reduction of the total injection dose of luciferin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22929655
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10481
      1. Author :
        Yipp, B. G.; Petri, B.; Salina, D.; Jenne, C. N.; Scott, B. N.; Zbytnuik, L. D.; Pittman, K.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Wu, K.; Meijndert, H. C.; Malawista, S. E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, A.; Zhang, K.; Conly, J.; Kubes, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging, Analysis of Variance; Animals; Extracellular Space/*metabolism; Genetic Vectors/genetics; Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Movement/*physiology; Neutrophils/*immunology/metabolism/physiology; Opsonin Proteins/metabolism; Skin Diseases, Bacterial/*immunology/metabolism; Toll-Like Receptor 2/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released as neutrophils die in vitro in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap that invasive microbes may exploit. Neutrophils capable of migration and phagocytosis while undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented systemic bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling, thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMNs developed diffuse decondensed nuclei, ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei showed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A requirement for both Toll-like receptor 2 and complement-mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally, live human PMNs injected into mouse skin developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo, and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection NETosis involves neutrophils that do not undergo lysis and retain the ability to multitask.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22922410
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10565
      1. Author :
        Shiota, M.; Zardan, A.; Takeuchi, A.; Kumano, M.; Beraldi, E.; Naito, S.; Zoubeidi, A.; Gleave, M. E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Base Sequence; Blotting, Western; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation; Clusterin/genetics/*physiology; DNA Primers; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/*physiology; Humans; Male; Mice; *Neoplasm Metastasis; Nuclear Proteins/*physiology; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Prostatic Neoplasms/*pathology; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Transforming Growth Factor beta/*physiology; Twist Transcription Factor/*physiology
      12. Abstract :
        TGF-beta promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and induces clusterin (CLU) expression, linking these genes to cancer metastasis. CLU is a pleiotropic molecular chaperone that confers survival and proliferative advantage to cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-beta regulates CLU expression and CLU affects metastasis remain unknown. In this study, we report that the transcription factor Twist1 mediates TGF-beta-induced CLU expression. By binding to E-boxes in the distal promoter region of CLU gene, Twist1 regulated basal and TGF-beta-induced CLU transcription. In addition, CLU reduction reduced TGF-beta induction of the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin and fibronectin, thereby inhibiting the migratory and invasive properties induced by TGF-beta. Targeted inhibition of CLU also suppressed metastasis in an in vivo model. Taken together, our findings indicate that CLU is an important mediator of TGF-beta-induced EMT, and suggest that CLU suppression may represent a promising therapeutic option for suppressing prostate cancer metastatic progression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22896337
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10540
      1. Author :
        Fu, A.; Wilson, R. J.; Smith, B. R.; Mullenix, J.; Earhart, C.; Akin, D.; Guccione, S.; Wang, S. X.; Gambhir, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        ACS Nano
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Fluorescent Dyes/*chemistry/*diagnostic use; Glioblastoma/*pathology; Humans; Magnetic Fields; Magnetite Nanoparticles/*diagnostic use; Materials Testing; Mice; Mice, SCID; Microscopy, Fluorescence/*methods; Nanocapsules/*chemistry/ultrastructure; Particle Size
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection and targeted therapy are two major challenges in the battle against cancer. Novel imaging contrast agents and targeting approaches are greatly needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of cancer theranostic agents. Here, we implemented a novel approach using a magnetic micromesh and biocompatible fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMN) to magnetically enhance cancer targeting in living subjects. This approach enables magnetic targeting of systemically administered individual FMN, containing a single 8 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide core. Using a human glioblastoma mouse model, we show that nanoparticles can be magnetically retained in both the tumor neovasculature and surrounding tumor tissues. Magnetic accumulation of nanoparticles within the neovasculature was observable by fluorescence intravital microscopy in real time. Finally, we demonstrate that such magnetically enhanced cancer targeting augments the biological functions of molecules linked to the nanoparticle surface.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22857784
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10434
      1. Author :
        Close, P.; Gillard, M.; Ladang, A.; Jiang, Z.; Papuga, J.; Hawkes, N.; Nguyen, L.; Chapelle, J. P.; Bouillenne, F.; Svejstrup, J.; Fillet, M.; Chariot, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        287
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Carrier Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; *Cell Movement; Gene Deletion; HEK293 Cells; Humans; Melanoma/genetics/*metabolism/pathology; Multiprotein Complexes/genetics/*metabolism; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; RNA Polymerase II/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The Elongator complex is composed of 6 subunits (Elp1-Elp6) and promotes RNAPII transcript elongation through histone acetylation in the nucleus as well as tRNA modification in the cytoplasm. This acetyltransferase complex directly or indirectly regulates numerous biological processes ranging from exocytosis and resistance to heat shock in yeast to cell migration and neuronal differentiation in higher eukaryotes. The identity of human ELP1 through ELP4 has been reported but human ELP5 and ELP6 have remained uncharacterized. Here, we report that DERP6 (ELP5) and C3ORF75 (ELP6) encode these subunits of human Elongator. We further investigated the importance and function of these two subunits by a combination of biochemical analysis and cellular assays. Our results show that DERP6/ELP5 is required for the integrity of Elongator and directly connects ELP3 to ELP4. Importantly, the migration and tumorigenicity of melanoma-derived cells are significantly decreased upon Elongator depletion through ELP1 or ELP3. Strikingly, DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6-depleted melanoma cells have similar defects, further supporting the idea that DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 are essential for Elongator function. Together, our data identify DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 as key players for migration, invasion and tumorigenicity of melanoma cells, as integral subunits of Elongator.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22854966
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 20
      15. Serial :
        10530
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