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      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Sterenborg, H. J.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; Van Driel, P. B.; de Jong, R. J.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Head Neck
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        34
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense
      12. Abstract :
        A key aspect for the postoperative prognosis of patients with head and neck cancer is complete tumor resection. In current practice, the intraoperative assessment of the tumor-free margin is dependent on visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging has the potential of traversing the gap between radiology and surgery by providing real-time visualization of the tumor, thereby allowing for image-guided surgery. The use of the near-infrared light spectrum offers 2 essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-to-background ratio of contrast agents. In this review, the current practice and limitations of image-guided surgery by optical imaging using intrinsic fluorescence or contrast agents are described. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the various molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer that have been used in other fields of oncologic surgery, and we describe perspectives on its future use in head and neck cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21284051
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 31
      15. Serial :
        10369
      1. Author :
        Gillrie, Mark R; Zbytnuik, Lori; McAvoy, Erin; Kapadia, Roxna; Lee, Kristine; Waterhouse, Christopher C M; Davis, Shevaun P; Muruve, Daniel A; Kubes, Paul; Ho, May
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European journal of immunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        40
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Endothelial Cells; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Humans; Interferon-gamma; Lipopolysaccharides; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Teichoic Acids; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Transplantation Chimera; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The response of leukocytes to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a TLR2-dependent major cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus, is linked to the outcome of an infection. In this study we investigated the role of nonhematopoietic TLR2 in response to LTA and S. aureus by creating bone marrow chimeras. Significant leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA required IFN-gamma priming in WT C57BL/6 and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice, but was not observed in TLR2(-/-) or WT-->TLR2(-/-) animals. LTA also induced a proinflammatory response in IFN-gamma primed primary human microvascular endothelial cells leading to leukocyte recruitment in vitro. When mice were infected with S. aureus, the most profound elevation of TNF-alpha and IL-6 was seen in TLR2(-/-) and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice. TLR2(-/-), but not chimeric mice, demonstrated increased IL-17, blood leukocytosis and pulmonary neutrophilia compared to WT mice. Collectively, the results suggest an essential role for IFN-gamma and nonhematopoietic TLR2 for leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA. In contrast, TLR2 on both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells appears to orchestrate an inhibitory response to S. aureus such that in complete TLR2 deficiency, there is an exaggerated proinflammatory response and/or skewing of the immune response towards a Th17 phenotype that may contribute to the decreased survival of TLR2(-/-) mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20306471
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9036
      1. Author :
        Kenneth M. Kozloff, Luisa Quinti, Somying Patntirapong, Peter V. Hauschka, Ching-Hsuan Tung, Ralph Weissleder and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; ProSense; OsteoSense; bone; osteoclast; cathepsin K; non-invasive imaging; molecular imaging; fluorescence; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix by demineralization followed by degradation of type I collagen through secretion of the cysteine protease, cathepsin K. Current imaging modalities are insufficient for sensitive observation of osteoclast activity, and in vivo live imaging of osteoclast resorption of bone has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we describe a near-infrared fluorescence reporter probe whose activation by cathepsin K is shown in live osteoclast cells and in mouse models of development and osteoclast upregulation. Cathepsin K probe activity was monitored in live osteoclast cultures and correlates with cathepsin K gene expression. In ovariectomized mice, cathepsin K probe upregulation precedes detection of bone loss by micro-computed tomography. These results are the first to demonstrate non-invasive visualization of bone degrading enzymes in models of accelerated bone loss, and may provide a means for early diagnosis of upregulated resorption and rapid feedback on efficacy of treatment protocols prior to significant loss of bone in the patient.
      13. URL :
        http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00816-8/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4526
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        26
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        Cardiovascular disease; Atherosclerosis; Vulnerable plaque; Spectroscopy; Intravascular; in vivo imaging; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Many apparent healthy persons die from cardiovascular disease, despite major advances in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are able to predict cardiovascular events in the long run, but fail to assess current disease activity or nearby cardiovascular events. There is a clear relation between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and the presence of so-called vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques are characterized by active inflammation, a thin cap and a large lipid pool. Spectroscopy is an optical imaging technique which depicts the interaction between light and tissues, and thereby shows the biochemical composition of tissues. In recent years, impressive advances have been made in spectroscopy technology and intravascular spectroscopy is able to assess the composition of plaques of interest and thereby to identify and actually quantify plaque vulnerability. This review summarizes the current evidence for spectroscopy as a measure of plaque vulnerability and discusses the potential role of intravascular spectroscopic imaging techniques.
      13. URL :
        http://www.springerlink.com/content/kx38073782g98666/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4552
      1. Author :
        Filip K. Swirski, Matthias Nahrendorf, Martin Etzrodt, Moritz Wildgruber, Virna Cortez-Retamozo, Peter Panizzi, Jose-Luiz Figueiredo, Rainer H. Kohler, Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Peter Waterman, Elena Aikawa, Thorsten R. Mempel, Peter Libby, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Science
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        325
      8. Issue :
        5940
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research; Immunology
      11. Keywords :
        splenic monocytes; in vivo imaging; ProSense; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        A current paradigm states that monocytes circulate freely and patrol blood vessels but differentiate irreversibly into dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages upon tissue entry. Here we show that bona fide undifferentiated monocytes reside in the spleen and outnumber their equivalents in circulation. The reservoir monocytes assemble in clusters in the cords of the subcapsular red pulp and are distinct from macrophages and DCs. In response to ischemic myocardial injury, splenic monocytes increase their motility, exit the spleen en masse, accumulate in injured tissue, and participate in wound healing. These observations uncover a role for the spleen as a site for storage and rapid deployment of monocytes and identify splenic monocytes as a resource that the body exploits to regulate inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencemag.org/content/325/5940/612.abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4567
      1. Author :
        Katharina Jannasch, Jeannine Missbach-Guentner and Frauke Alves
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        N/A
      5. Publication :
        Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Drug Discovery
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; ProSense; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        The incidence of asthma is increasing throughout the world. Animal models are crucial for understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and for developing new therapies. Novel imaging approaches will be a powerful tool for studying asthma in animal models. This review will give a short overview of different imaging techniques that are currently used and will focus on new developments in visualization of asthma that might be used in animals as well as being translated to humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B75D8-4Y5GVHG-1&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F28%2F2010&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=browse&_origin=browse&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=58c3195065086c72b7aa74f13df11
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4533
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