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      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Mol, I. M.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; Van Driel, P. B.; Xie, B.; Baatenburg de Jong, R. J.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        105
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/*pathology/surgery; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Humans; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mouth Neoplasms/*pathology/surgery; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; *Surgery, Computer-Assisted
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence optical imaging is a promising technique to assess the tumor margins during cancer surgery. This technique requires targeting by specific fluorescence agents to differentiate tumor from normal surrounding tissue. We assessed the feasibility of cancer detection using NIR fluorescence agents that target either alphavbeta3 integrins or the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in an orthotopic mouse model of oral cancer. METHODS: Binding of the integrin-targeted agent to tumor cells was assessed in vitro. Oral cancer was induced in 6 BALB/c nu/nu mice by submucosal inoculation of human OSC19-luc cells into the tongue. Tumor growth was followed with bioluminescence imaging. A combination of agents targeting integrins or EPR effect was injected followed by fluorescence imaging in vivo and ex vivo after resection of the tongues. RESULTS: Oral cancer was clearly demarcated in vitro; in vivo; and on histological analysis with sufficient tumor-to-background ratios of the contrast agents. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the feasibility of optical imaging of oral squamous cell carcinoma based on targeting of alphavbeta3 integrins and the EPR effect. Once these NIR fluorescence agents become available for clinical testing, optical image-guided surgery could reduce residual disease after oral cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21952950
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 28
      15. Serial :
        10368
      1. Author :
        Hosman, A. H.; Bulstra, S. K.; Sjollema, J.; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Neut, D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Orthop Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Wear of metal-on-metal (cobalt-chromium, Co-Cr particles) and metal-on-polyethylene (ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene, UHMWPE particles) bearing surfaces in hip prostheses is a major problem in orthopedics. This study aimed to compare the influence of Co-Cr and UHMWPE particles on the persistence of infection. Bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus Xen36 were injected in air pouches prepared in subcutaneous tissue of immuno-competent BALB/c mice (control), as a model for the joint space, in the absence or presence of Co-Cr or UHMWPE particles. Bioluminescence was monitored longitudinally up to 21 days, corrected for absorption and reflection by the particles and expressed relative to the bioluminescence found in the presence of staphylococci only. After termination, air pouch fluid and air pouch membrane were cultured and histologically analyzed. Bioluminescence was initially lower in mice exposed to UHMWPE particles with staphylococci than in mice injected with staphylococci only, possibly because UHMWPE particles initially stimulated a higher macrophage presence in murine air pouch membranes. For mice exposed to Co-Cr particles with staphylococci, bioluminescence was observed to be higher in two out of six animals compared to the presence of staphylococci alone. In the majority of mice, infection risk in the absence or presence of Co-Cr and UHMWPE particles appeared similar, assuming that the longevity of an elevated bioluminescence is indicative of a higher infection risk. However, the presence of Co-Cr particles yielded a higher bioluminescence in two out of six mice, possibly because the macrophage degradative function was hampered by the presence of Co-Cr particles. (c) 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21866572
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10409
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research: official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acinetobacter baumannii; Acinetobacter Infections; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colistin; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial; Female; Fractures, Bone; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Osteomyelitis; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Osteomyelitis (OM) from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter has emerged in >30% of combat-related injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan. While most of these strains are sensitive to colistin, the drug is not available in bone void fillers for local high-dose delivery. To address this, we developed a mouse model with MDR strains isolated from wounded military personnel. In contrast to S. aureus OM, which is osteolytic and characterized by biofilm in necrotic bone, A. baumannii OM results in blastic lesions that do not contain apparent biofilm. We also found that mice mount a specific IgG response against three proteins (40, 47, and 56 kDa) regardless of the strain used, suggesting that these may be immuno-dominant antigens. PCR for the A. baumannii-specific parC gene confirmed a 100% infection rate with 75% of the MDR strains, and in vitro testing confirmed that all strains were sensitive to colistin. We also developed a real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) assay that could detect as few as 10 copies of parC in a sample. To demonstrate the efficacy of colistin prophylaxis in this model, mice were treated with either parenteral colistin (0.2 mg colistinmethate i.m. for 7 days), local colistin (PMMA bead impregnated with 1.0 mg colistin sulfate), or an unloaded PMMA bead control. While the parenteral colistin failed to demonstrate any significant effects versus the placebo, the colistin PMMA bead significantly reduced the infection rate such that only 29.2% of the mice had detectable levels of parC at 19 days (p < 0.05 vs. i.m. colistin and placebo).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19173261
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9043
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research: official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        26
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibody Formation; Bacterial Proteins; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; DNA, Bacterial; Endonucleases; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Micrococcal Nuclease; Osteolysis; Osteomyelitis; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Tibia; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Although osteomyelitis (OM) remains a serious problem in orthopedics, progress has been limited by the absence of an in vivo model that can quantify the bacterial load, metabolic activity of the bacteria over time, immunity, and osteolysis. To overcome these obstacles, we developed a murine model of implant-associated OM in which a stainless steel pin is coated with Staphylococcus aureus and implanted transcortically through the tibial metaphysis. X-ray and micro-CT demonstrated concomitant osteolysis and reactive bone formation, which was evident by day 7. Histology confirmed all the hallmarks of implant-associated OM, namely: osteolysis, sequestrum formation, and involucrum of Gram-positive bacteria inside a biofilm within necrotic bone. Serology revealed that mice mount a protective humoral response that commences with an IgM response after 1 week, and converts to a specific IgG2b response against specific S. aureus proteins by day 11 postinfection. Real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) for the S. aureus specific nuc gene determined that the peak bacterial load occurs 11 days postinfection. This coincidence of decreasing bacterial load with the generation of specific antibodies is suggestive of protective humoral immunity. Longitudinal in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) of luxA-E transformed S. aureus (Xen29) combined with nuc RTQ-PCR demonstrated the exponential growth phase of the bacteria immediately following infection that peaks on day 4, and is followed by the biofilm growth phase at a significantly lower metabolic rate (p < 0.05). Collectively, these studies demonstrate the first quantitative model of implant-associated OM that defines the kinetics of microbial growth, osteolysis, and humoral immunity following infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17676625
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9047
      1. Author :
        Engelsman, Anton F; van der Mei, Henny C; Francis, Kevin P; Busscher, Henk J; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Dam, Gooitzen M
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical materials research. Part B, Applied biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        88
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bacterial Adhesion; Biofilms; Bioware; Chromosomes, Bacterial; Colony Count, Microbial; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Prostheses and Implants; pXen-5; Soft Tissue Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is the main cause of biomaterials-related failure. A simple technique to test in-vivo new antimicrobial and/or nonadhesive implant coatings is unavailable. Current in vitro methods for studying bacterial adhesion and growth on biomaterial surfaces lack the influence of the host immune system. Most in vivo methods to study biomaterials-related infections routinely involve implant-removal, preventing comprehensive longitudinal monitoring. In vivo imaging circumvents these drawbacks and is based on the use of noninvasive optical imaging of bioluminescent bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus Xen29 is genetically modified to be stably bioluminescent, by the introduction of a modified full lux operon onto its chromosome. Surgical meshes with adhering S. aureus Xen29 were implanted in mice and bacterial growth and spread into the surrounding tissue was monitored longitudinally from bioluminescence with a highly sensitive CCD camera. Distinct spatiotemporal bioluminescence patterns, extending beyond the mesh area into surrounding tissues were observed. After 10 days, the number of living organisms isolated from explanted meshes was found to correlate with bioluminescence prior to sacrifice of the animals. Therefore, it is concluded that in vivo imaging using bioluminescent bacteria is ideally suited to study antimicrobial coatings taking into account the host immune system. In addition, longitudinal monitoring of infection in one animal will significantly reduce the number of experiments and animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18618733
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9020
      1. Author :
        Pickert, G.; Lim, H. Y.; Weigert, A.; Haussler, A.; Myrczek, T.; Waldner, M.; Labocha, S.; Ferreiros, N.; Geisslinger, G.; Lotsch, J.; Becker, C.; Brune, B.; Tegeder, I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense
      12. Abstract :
        GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) is the key-enzyme to produce the essential enzyme cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin. The byproduct, neopterin is increased in advanced human cancer and used as cancer-biomarker, suggesting that pathologically increased GCH1 activity may promote tumor growth. We found that inhibition or silencing of GCH1 reduced tumor cell proliferation and survival and the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, which upon hypoxia increased GCH1 and endothelial NOS expression, the latter prevented by inhibition of GCH1. In nude mice xenografted with HT29-Luc colon cancer cells GCH1 inhibition reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis, determined by in vivo luciferase and near-infrared imaging of newly formed blood vessels. The treatment with the GCH1 inhibitor shifted the phenotype of tumor associated macrophages from the proangiogenic M2 towards M1, accompanied with a shift of plasma chemokine profiles towards tumor-attacking chemokines including CXCL10 and RANTES. GCH1 expression was increased in mouse AOM/DSS-induced colon tumors and in high grade human colon and skin cancer and oppositely, the growth of GCH1-deficient HT29-Luc tumor cells in mice was strongly reduced. The data suggest that GCH1 inhibition reduces tumor growth by (i) direct killing of tumor cells, (ii) by inhibiting angiogenesis, and (iii) by enhancing the antitumoral immune response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22753274
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10377
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U87-MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, U87MG-luc2, Bioluminescence, Glioma, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10424
      1. Author :
        Vandamme, M.; Robert, E.; Lerondel, S.; Sarron, V.; Ries, D.; Dozias, S.; Sobilo, J.; Gosset, D.; Kieda, C.; Legrain, B.; Pouvesle, J. M.; Pape, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules/atoms leading to a highly reactive gas at ambient temperature containing excited molecules, reactive species and generating transient electric fields. Given its potential to interact with tissue or cells without a significant temperature increase, NTP appears as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases including cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interest of NTP both in vitro and in vivo. To this end, we evaluated the antitumor activity of NTP in vitro on two human cancer cell lines (glioblastoma U87MG and colorectal carcinoma HCT-116). Our data showed that NTP generated a large amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the formation of DNA damages. This resulted in a multiphase cell cycle arrest and a subsequent apoptosis induction. In addition, in vivo experiments on U87MG bearing mice showed that NTP induced a reduction of bioluminescence and tumor volume as compared to nontreated mice. An induction of apoptosis was also observed together with an accumulation of cells in S phase of the cell cycle suggesting an arrest of tumor proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated here that the potential of NTP to generate ROS renders this strategy particularly promising in the context of tumor treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21702038
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10498
      1. Author :
        O'Connor, A. E.; Mc Gee, M. M.; Likar, Y.; Ponomarev, V.; Callanan, J. J.; O'Shea D, F.; Byrne, A. T.; Gallagher, W. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for cancer. ADPM06 is an emerging non-porphyrin PDT agent which has been specifically designed for therapeutic application. Recently, we have demonstrated that ADPM06-PDT is well tolerated in vivo and elicits impressive complete response rates in various models of cancer when a short drug-light interval is applied. Herein, the mechanism of action of ADPM06-PDT in vitro and in vivo is outlined. Using a drug and light combination that reduces the clonogenicity of MDA-MB-231 cells by >90%, we detected a well-orchestrated apoptotic response accompanied by the activation of various caspases in vitro. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photosensitizer irradiation was found to be the key instigator in the observed apoptotic response, with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) found to be the intracellular site of initial PDT damage, as determined by induction of a rapid ER stress response post-PDT. PDT-induced apoptosis was also found to be independent of p53 tumor suppressor status. A robust therapeutic response in vivo was demonstrated, with a substantial reduction in tumor proliferation observed, as well as a rapid induction of apoptosis and initiation of ER stress, mirroring numerous aspects of the mechanism of action of ADPM06 in vitro. Finally, using a combination of (18) F-labeled 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ((18) F-FLT) nuclear and optical imaging, a considerable decrease in tumor proliferation over 24-hr in two models of human cancer was observed. Taken together, this data clearly establishes ADPM06 as an exciting novel PDT agent with significant potential for further translational development.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21413012
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10516
      1. Author :
        Sharma, Praveen K; Singh, Rajesh; Novakovic, Kristian R; Eaton, John W; Grizzle, William E; Singh, Shailesh
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        127
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Chemokines, CC; Disease Progression; Enzyme Activation; Etoposide; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; PC-3M-luc; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Prostatic Neoplasms; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; Receptors, CCR; Signal Transduction
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in treatment and management of prostate cancer (PCa), it remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the US. Chemotherapy is one of the treatment alternatives for hormone refractory metastatic PCa. However, current chemotherapeutic regimens provide palliative benefit but relatively modest survival advantage primarily due to chemo-resistance and upregulated antiapoptotic machineries in PCa cells. Therefore, blocking the mechanisms responsible for suppression of apoptosis might improve current chemotherapeutic regimens. In this study, we show that CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) and its natural ligand CCL25 interaction upregulates antiapoptotic proteins (i.e., PI3K, AKT, ERK1/2 and GSK-3beta) and downregulate activation of caspase-3 in PCa cells. Significant downregulation of these CCR9-mediated antiapoptotic proteins in the presence of a PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin), further suggests that the antiapoptotic action of CCR9 is primarily regulated through PI3K. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of etoposide was significantly inhibited in the presence of CCL25, and this inhibitory effect of CCL25 was abrogated when CCR9-CCL25 interaction was blocked using anti-CCR9 monoclonal antibodies. In conformation to these in vitro studies, significant reduction in tumor burden was found in mice receiving CCL25 neutralizing antibodies and etoposide together as compared to both as a single agent. These results suggest that the CCR9-CCL25 axis mediates PI3K/AKT-dependent antiapoptotic signals in PCa cells and could be a possible reason for low apoptosis and modest chemotherapeutic response. Therefore, targeting CCR9-CCL25 axis with cytotoxic agents may provide better therapeutic outcomes than using cytotoxic agents alone.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20127861
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8945
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