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      1. Author :
        Peter, Christoph; Kielstein, Jan T; Clarke-Katzenberg, Regina; Adams, M Christopher; Pitsiouni, Maria; Kambham, Neeraja; Karimi, Mobin A; Kengatharan, Ken M; Cooke, John P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of urology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        177
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; carcinoma, renal cell; Cell Culture Techniques; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Firefly Luciferin; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Kidney Neoplasms; Luminescence; Luminescent Agents; Male; Mice; Mice, SCID; Models, Biological; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE Bioluminescent imaging permits sensitive in vivo detection and quantification of cells engineered to emit light. We developed a bioluminescent human renal cancer cell line for in vitro and in vivo studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS The 2 human renal cell carcinoma cell lines SN12-C and SN12-L1 were stably transfected to constitutively express luciferase using a retroviral shuttle. The bioluminescent signal was correlated with tumor cell numbers in vitro. Parental and transfected cells were compared by growth kinetics and histology. Tumor burden after heterotopic injection in immune deficient mice was monitored up to 39 days. The kinetics of the bioluminescent signal was evaluated for 1 to 60 minutes following luciferin injection. RESULTS Bioengineered renal cancer cell lines stably expressed luciferase. The growth kinetics of the cells in vitro and the histology of tumors resulting from implantation of these cells were unaffected by retroviral transfection with the luciferase gene. As few as 1,000 cells could be reliably detected. The intensity of the bioluminescent signal correlated with the number of tumor cells in vitro. Photon emission in vivo and ex vivo correlated significantly with tumor weight at sacrifice. After intraperitoneal injection of luciferin there was a time dependent change in the intensity of the bioluminescent signal with maximum photon emission at 20 minutes (optimal 17 to 25). CONCLUSIONS Luciferase transfected human renal cancer lines allow reliable, rapid, noninvasive and longitudinal monitoring of tumor growth in vivo. The ability to assess tumor development in vivo with time is economical and effective compared to end point data experiments.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17509355
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9009
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, Leslie; Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Painter, Cory L; Zhang, Cathy; Rahavendran, Sadayappan V; Shen, Zhongzhou
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chromatography, Liquid; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4; Drug Stability; Female; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms, Experimental; Piperazines; Protein kinase inhibitors; Pyridines; Sensitivity and Specificity; Tandem Mass Spectrometry; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        Phase II attrition of clinical candidates in the drug development cycle is currently a major issue facing the pharmaceutical industry. To decrease phase II attrition, there is an increased emphasis on validation of mechanism of action, development of efficacy models and measurement of drug levels at the site of action. PD 0332991, a highly specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK-4) is currently in clinical development for the treatment of solid tumor. A clinical presurgical study will be required to better understand how PD 0332991 affects signaling pathways and how the intratumoral concentration of PD 0332991 correlates with plasma PK parameters and molecular alterations in breast cancer tissues after PD 0332991 treatment. Before conducting such a clinical study, it is important to evaluate PD 0332991 levels in tumor tissue samples from a xenograft mouse model for the determination of drug exposure at the site of action. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to develop and validate a sensitive LC-MS/MS method to quantify PD 0332991 in mouse tumor tissues from MDA-MB-231-Luc human breast tumor xenografts in SCID-beige mice; (2) to quantify PD 0332991 levels in mouse tumor tissues after oral administration of PD 0332991 at 10 and 100mg/kg using the validated LC-MS/MS method. Both liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and supported liquid extraction (SLE) in a 96-well format were developed and evaluated to achieve optimal extraction recovery with minimal matrix effects. The newly developed SLE method is more efficient (speed and ease) and demonstrates comparable recovery (93.1-100% at three different concentrations) compared to the traditional LLE method. The validated LC-MS/MS for PD 032291 in mouse tumor tissue homogenate method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.1-100 ng/mL with inter-day accuracy and precision within 15%. The validated method was successfully applied to measure PD 0332991 levels in tumor tissues in MDA-MB-231-Luc human breast tumor xenografts in SCID beige mice. The mean tumor concentrations at 6h post-oral PD 0332991 administration at 10 and 100mg/kg were 1793 (+/-1008) and 25,163 (+/-3959) ng/g, respectively.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20236782
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8987
      1. Author :
        Fu, J. Y.; Zhang, W.; Blatchford, D. R.; Tetley, L.; McConnell, G.; Dufes, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Control Release
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        The therapeutic potential of tocotrienol, a vitamin E extract with anti-cancer properties, is hampered by its failure to specifically reach tumors after intravenous administration. In this work, we demonstrated that novel transferrin-bearing, tocopheryl-based multilamellar vesicles entrapping tocotrienol significantly improved tocotrienol uptake by cancer cells overexpressing transferrin receptors. This led to a dramatically improved therapeutic efficacy in vitro, ranging from 17-fold to 72-fold improvement depending on the cell lines, compared to the free drug. In vivo, the intravenous administration of this novel tocotrienol formulation led to complete tumor eradication for 40% of B16-F10 murine melanoma tumors and 20% of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma tumors. Animal survival was improved by more than 20days compared to controls, for the two tumor models tested. These therapeutic effects, together with the lack of toxicity, potentially make transferrin-bearing vesicles entrapping tocotrienol a highly promising therapeutic system as part as an anti-cancer therapeutic strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21539872
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10356
      1. Author :
        Cirstoiu-Hapca, A; Buchegger, F; Lange, N; Bossy, L; Gurny, R; Delie, F
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of controlled release: official journal of the Controlled Release Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        144
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibodies, Monoclonal; Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers; Female; Humans; Mice; Nanoparticles; Ovarian Neoplasms; Paclitaxel; Receptor, erbB-2; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Tissue Distribution; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        The benefit of polymeric immuno-nanoparticles (NPs-Tx-HER), consisting of paclitaxel (Tx)-loaded nanoparticles coated with anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (Herceptin, trastuzumab), in cancer treatment was assessed in a disseminated xenograft ovarian cancer model induced by intraperitoneal inoculation of SKOV-3 cells overexpressing HER2 antigens. The study was focused on the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and biodistribution of NPs-Tx-HER compared to other Tx formulations. The therapeutic efficacy was determined by two methods: bioluminescence imaging and survival rate. The treatment regimen consisted in an initial dose of 20mg/kg Tx administered as 10mg/kg intravenously (IV) and 10mg/kg intraperitonealy (IP), followed by five alternative IP and IV injections of 10mg/kg Tx every 3 days. The bioluminescence study has clearly shown the superior anti-tumor activity of NPs-Tx-HER compared to free Tx. As a confirmation of these results, a significantly longer survival of mice was observed for NPs-Tx-HER treatment compared to free Tx, Tx-loaded nanoparticles coated with an irrelevant mAb (Mabthera, rituximab) or Herceptin alone, indicating the potential of immuno-nanoparticles in cancer treatment. The biodistribution pattern of Tx was assessed on healthy and tumor bearing mice after IV or IP administration. An equivalent biodistribution profile was observed in healthy mice for Tx encapsulated either in uncoated nanoparticles (NPs-Tx) or in NPs-Tx-HER. No significant difference in Tx biodistribution was observed after IV or IP injection, except for a lower accumulation in the lungs when NPs were administered by IP. Encapsulated Tx accumulated in the organs of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES) such as the liver and spleen, whereas free Tx had a non-specific distribution in all tested organs. Compared to free Tx, the single dose injection (IV or IP) of encapsulated Tx in mice bearing tumors induced a higher tumor accumulation. However, no difference in overall tumor accumulation between NPs-Tx-HER and NPs-Tx was observed. In conclusion, the encapsulation of Tx into NPs-Tx-HER immuno-nanoparticles resulted in an improved efficacy of drug in the treatment of disseminated ovarian cancer overexpressing HER2 receptors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20219607
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9012
      1. Author :
        Cabral, Horacio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of controlled release: official journal of the Controlled Release Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        121
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Hela Cells; HeLa-luc; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Micelles; Neoplasms; Organoplatinum Compounds; Platinum; Polymers; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Polymeric micelles are promising nanocarriers, which might enhance the efficacy of antitumor drugs. Herein, polymeric micelles incorporating dichloro(1,2-diamino-cyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt), the oxaliplatin parent complex, were prepared through the polymer-metal complex formation of DACHPt with poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(glutamic acid) [PEG-b-P(Glu)] block copolymer having different lengths of the poly(glutamic acid) block [p(Glu): 20, 40, and 70 U]. The resulting micelles were studied with the aim of optimizing the system's biological performance. DACHPt-loaded micelles (DACHPt/m) were approximately 40 nm in diameter and had a narrow size distribution. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor activity experiments (CDF1 mice bearing the murine colon adenocarcinoma C-26 inoculated subcutaneously) showed 20-fold greater accumulation of DACHPt/m at the tumor site than free oxaliplatin to achieve substantially higher antitumor efficacy. Moreover, the micelles prepared from PEG-b-P(Glu) with 20 U of P(Glu) exhibited the lowest non-specific accumulation in the liver and spleen to critically reduce non-specific accumulation, resulting in higher specificity to solid tumors. The antitumor effect of DACHPt/m was also evaluated on multiple metastases generated from intraperitoneally injected bioluminescent HeLa (HeLa-Luc) cells. The in vivo bioluminescent data indicated that DACHPt/m decreased the signal 10-to 50-fold compared to the control indicating a very strong antitumor activity. These results suggest that DACHPt/m could be an outstanding drug delivery system for oxaliplatin in the treatment of solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17628162
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9007
      1. Author :
        Baoum, A.; Ovcharenko, D.; Berkland, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Pharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        427
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Calcium/chemistry; Cell Line; Cell-Penetrating Peptides/administration & dosage/*chemistry; Drug Carriers/administration & dosage/adverse effects/*chemistry; *Gene Silencing; Genetic Therapy/*methods; Humans; Luciferases; Nanoparticles/administration & dosage/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Tissue Distribution
      12. Abstract :
        The development of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) offers new strategies for manipulating specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. Myriad cationic polymer and lipid formulations have been explored, but an effective, non-toxic carrier remains a major barrier to clinical translation. Among the emerging candidates for siRNA carriers are cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can traverse the plasma membrane and facilitate the intracellular delivery of siRNA. Previously, a highly efficient and non-cytotoxic means of gene delivery was designed by complexing plasmid DNA with CPPs, then condensing with calcium. Here, the CPP TAT and a longer, 'double' TAT (dTAT) were investigated as potential carriers for siRNA. Various N/P ratios and calcium concentrations were used to optimize siRNA complexes in vitro. Upon addition of calcium, 'loose' siRNA/CPP complexes were condensed into small nanoparticles. Knockdown of luciferase expression in the human epithelial lung cell line A549-luc-C8 was high (up to 93%) with no evidence of cytotoxicity. Selected formulations of the dTAT complexes were dosed intravenously up to 1000 mg/kg with minimal toxicity. Biodistribution studies revealed high levels of gene knockdown in the lung and muscle tissue suggesting these simple vectors may offer a translatable approach to siRNA delivery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21856394
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10519
      1. Author :
        Jadert, C.; Petersson, J.; Massena, S.; Ahl, D.; Grapensparr, L.; Holm, L.; Lundberg, J. O.; Phillipson, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Free Radic Biol Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Nitric oxide (NO) generated by vascular NO synthases can exert anti-inflammatory effects, partly through its ability to decrease leukocyte recruitment. Inorganic nitrate and nitrite, from endogenous or dietary sources, have emerged as alternative substrates for NO formation in mammals. Bioactivation of nitrate is believed to require initial reduction to nitrite by oral commensal bacteria. Here we investigated the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on leukocyte recruitment in microvascular inflammation and in NSAID-induced small-intestinal injury. We show that leukocyte emigration in response to the proinflammatory chemokine MIP-2 is reduced by 70% after 7days of dietary nitrate supplementation as well as by acute intravenous nitrite administration. Nitrite also reduced leukocyte adhesion to a similar extent and this effect was inhibited by the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ, whereas the effect on emigrated leukocytes was not altered by this treatment. Further studies in TNF-alpha-stimulated endothelial cells revealed that nitrite dose-dependently reduced the expression of ICAM-1. In rats and mice subjected to a challenge with diclofenac, dietary nitrate prevented the increase in myeloperoxidase and P-selectin levels in small-intestinal tissue. Antiseptic mouthwash, which eliminates oral nitrate reduction, markedly blunted the protective effect of dietary nitrate on P-selectin levels. Despite attenuation of the acute immune response, the overall ability to clear an infection with Staphylococcus aureus was not suppressed by dietary nitrate as revealed by noninvasive IVIS imaging. We conclude that dietary nitrate markedly reduces leukocyte recruitment to inflammation in a process involving attenuation of P-selectin and ICAM-1 upregulation. Bioactivation of dietary nitrate requires intermediate formation of nitrite by oral nitrate-reducing bacteria and then probably further reduction to NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides in the tissues.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22178413
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10452
      1. Author :
        E.A. te Velde; Th. Veerman; V. Subramaniam; Th. Ruers
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European Journal of Cancer Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        36
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Fluorescent; Sentinel node; Probe; Resection; Oncology; Surgery
      12. Abstract :
        Aims and background: Improved visualization of surgical targets inside of the patient helps to improve radical resection of the tumor while sparing healthy surrounding tissue. In order to achieve an image, optical contrast must be generated by properties intrinsic to the tissue, or require the attachment of special visualization labels to the tumor. In this overview the current status of the clinical use of fluorescent dyes and probes are reviewed.

        Methods: In this review, all experimental and clinical studies concerning fluorescent imaging were included. In addition, in the search for the optimal fluorescent imaging modality, all characteristics of a fluorescent dye were described.

        Findings and conclusions: Although the technique of imaging through fluorescence sounds promising and several animal models show efficacy, official approval of these agents for further clinical evaluation, is eagerly awaited.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ejso.com/article/S0748-7983%2809%2900498-3/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4491
      1. Author :
        Al Marzouqi, N.; Iratni, R.; Nemmar, A.; Arafat, K.; Ahmed Al Sultan, M.; Yasin, J.; Collin, P.; Mester, J.; Adrian, T. E.; Attoub, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Pharmacol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Breast cancer is a major challenge for pharmacologists to develop new drugs to improve the survival of cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa. It has been demonstrated that Frondoside A inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on human breast cancer cell survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth in nude mice, using the human estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The non-tumorigenic MCF10-A cell line derived from normal human mammary epithelium was used as control. Frondoside A (0.01-5muM) decreased the viability of breast cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with 50%-effective concentration (EC50) of 2.5muM at 24h. MCF10-A cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effect of Frondoside A (EC50 superior to 5muM at 24h). In the MDA-MB-231 cells, Frondoside A effectively increased the sub-G1 (apoptotic) cell fraction through the activation of p53, and subsequently the caspases 9 and 3/7 cell death pathways. In addition, Frondoside A induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion. In vivo, Frondoside A (100mug/kg/dayi.p. for 24days) strongly decreased the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without manifest toxic side-effects. Moreover, we found that Frondoside A could enhance the killing of breast cancer cells induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for breast cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21741966
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10490
      1. Author :
        Hu, Guohong; Chong, Robert A; Yang, Qifeng; Wei, Yong; Blanco, Mario A; Li, Feng; Reiss, Michael; Au, Jessie L-S; Haffty, Bruce G; Kang, Yibin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer cell
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aldehyde Dehydrogenase; Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm; Gene Expression Profiling; Genome, Human; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local; Prognosis; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met; Receptors, Growth Factor; Survival Rate; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Targeted therapy for metastatic diseases relies on the identification of functionally important metastasis genes from a large number of random genetic alterations. Here we use a computational algorithm to map minimal recurrent genomic alterations associated with poor-prognosis breast cancer. 8q22 genomic gain was identified by this approach and validated in an extensive collection of breast tumor samples. Regional gain of 8q22 elevates expression of the metastasis gene metadherin (MTDH), which is overexpressed in more than 40% of breast cancers and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Functional characterization of MTDH revealed its dual role in promoting metastatic seeding and enhancing chemoresistance. These findings establish MTDH as an important therapeutic target for simultaneously enhancing chemotherapy efficacy and reducing metastasis risk.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19111877
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8957
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