1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

121–130 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Cerchia, L.; Esposito, C. L.; Camorani, S.; Rienzo, A.; Stasio, L.; Insabato, L.; Affuso, A.; de Franciscis, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Axl is a tyrosine kinase receptor that was first identified as a transforming gene in human myeloid leukemia. Recent converging evidence suggests its implication in cancer progression and invasion for several solid tumors, including lung, breast, brain, thyroid, and pancreas. In the last decade, Axl has thus become an attractive target for therapeutic development of more aggressive cancers. An emerging class of therapeutic inhibitors is now represented by short nucleic acid aptamers. These molecules act as high affinity ligands with several advantages over conventional antibodies for their use in vivo, including their small size and negligible immunogenicity. Furthermore, these molecules can easily form conjugates able to drive the specific delivery of interfering RNAs, nanoparticles, or chemotherapeutics. We have thus generated and characterized a selective RNA-based aptamer, GL21.T that binds the extracellular domain of Axl at high affinity (12 nmol/l) and inhibits its catalytic activity. GL21.T blocked Axl-dependent transducing events in vitro, including Erk and Akt phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, as well as in vivo lung tumor formation in mice xenografts. In this respect, the GL21.T aptamer represents a promising therapeutic molecule for Axl-dependent cancers whose importance is highlighted by the paucity of available Axl-specific inhibitory molecules.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22910292
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10520
      1. Author :
        Takeshita, Fumitaka; Patrawala, Lubna; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Ryou-u; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Kawamata, Masaki; Kelnar, Kevin; Bader, Andreas G; Brown, David; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular therapy: the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aged; Animals; Bioware; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Down-Regulation; Humans; Male; Mice; MicroRNAs; Middle Aged; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
      12. Abstract :
        Recent reports have linked the expression of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) with tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, we show that microRNA (miR)-16, which is expressed at lower levels in prostate cancer cells, affects the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Transient transfection with synthetic miR-16 significantly reduced cell proliferation of 22Rv1, Du145, PPC-1, and PC-3M-luc cells. A prostate cancer xenograft model revealed that atelocollagen could efficiently deliver synthetic miR-16 to tumor cells on bone tissues in mice when injected into tail veins. In the therapeutic bone metastasis model, injection of miR-16 with atelocollagen via tail vein significantly inhibited the growth of prostate tumors in bone. Cell model studies indicate that miR-16 likely suppresses prostate tumor growth by regulating the expression of genes such as CDK1 and CDK2 associated with cell-cycle control and cellular proliferation. There is a trend toward lower miR-16 expression in human prostate tumors versus normal prostate tissues. Thus, this study indicates the therapeutic potential of miRNA in an animal model of cancer metastasis with systemic miRNA injection and suggest that systemic delivery of miR-16 could be used to treat patients with advanced prostate cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19738602
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8947
      1. Author :
        Smith, Eric L; Schuchman, Edward H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Molecular therapy: the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        16
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Autophagy; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Survival; Cells, Cultured; Ceramides; Cesium Radioisotopes; CHO Cells; Combined Modality Therapy; Cricetinae; Cricetulus; Endothelium, Vascular; Female; Gamma Rays; Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic; Gene Therapy; Humans; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase
      12. Abstract :
        Exposure of cells or animals to stress frequently induces acid sphingomyelinase (ASM)-mediated ceramide production that leads to cell death. Consistent with this, overexpression of ASM in subcutaneous B16-F10 mouse melanomas, in combination with irradiation, resulted in tumors that were up to 12-fold smaller than irradiated control melanomas. Similarly, when irradiated melanomas were pretreated with a single, peritumoral injection of recombinant ASM (rhASM), the tumors were up to threefold smaller. The in vivo effect of ASM was likely due to enhanced cell death of the tumor cells themselves, as well as the surrounding microvascular endothelial cells. In vitro, rhASM had little or no effect on the growth of tumor cells, even in combination with irradiation. However, when the culture media was acidified to mimic the acidic microenvironment of solid tumors, rhASM-mediated cell death was markedly enhanced when combined with irradiation. Microscopic analysis suggested that this was associated with an increase in autophagy. rhASM has been produced for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder, type B Niemann-Pick disease, and is currently being evaluated in a phase-1 clinical trial. Based on the data presented in this article, we propose that further investigation of this protein and gene as antineoplastic agents also is warranted.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18628757
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8999
      1. Author :
        Oashi, K.; Furukawa, H.; Nishihara, H.; Ozaki, M.; Oyama, A.; Funayama, E.; Hayashi, T.; Kuge, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Invest Dermatol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, Melanoma, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        In-transit metastasis (ITM) is a unique manifestation of intralymphatic tumor dissemination, characterized by the presence of melanoma cells between the primary lesion and the draining regional lymph node basin that is clinically associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we aimed to establish an experimental animal model of melanoma ITM, as research progress in this field has been hampered by a lack of suitable experimental models. We reproduced melanoma ITM in a mouse hind limb by transplanting melanoma cells into the footpad of a mouse with lymphedema (LE). The tumor cells at the ITM site were highly proliferative, and mice with ITMs were more likely than control mice to develop distant lymph node and lung metastases. Peritumoral lymphatic vessels and tumor-associated blood vessels were increased in the primary tumor site of the LE mice. Our established ITM melanoma mouse model enabled us to clarify the molecular determinants and pathophysiology of ITM. This ITM model is also comparable to the unfavorable clinical behavior of melanoma ITM in humans and, moreover, underlined the importance of lymphangiogenic factors in the tumor dissemination through the lymphatic system.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 6 September 2012; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.274.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22951727
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10501
      1. Author :
        Swirski, F. K.; Nahrendorf, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Immunol Cell Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Macrophages are central regulators of disease progression in both atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction (MI). In atherosclerosis, macrophages are the dominant leukocyte population that influences lesional development. In MI, which is caused by atherosclerosis, macrophages accumulate readily and have important roles in inflammation and healing. Molecular imaging has grown considerably as a field and can reveal biological process at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Here, we explore how various imaging modalities, from intravital microscopy in mice to organ-level imaging in patients, are contributing to our understanding of macrophages and their progenitors in cardiovascular disease.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 4 December 2012; doi:10.1038/icb.2012.72.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23207281
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10441
      1. Author :
        Zhang, H-Y; Man, J-H; Liang, B; Zhou, T; Wang, C-H; Li, T; Li, H-Y; Li, W-H; Jin, B-F; Zhang, P-J; Zhao, J; Pan, X; He, K; Gong, W-L; Zhang, X-M; Li, A-L
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer gene therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Apoptosis; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Escherichia coli; Female; Flow Cytometry; Gene Therapy; Genetic Vectors; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; NCI-H460-luc2; Neoplasms; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Survival Rate; TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand
      12. Abstract :
        The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent inducer of tumor cell apoptosis, but concerns of considerable liver toxicity limit its uses in human cancer therapy. Here, we show that i.v. injected Escherichia coli DH5alpha (E. coli DH5alpha) specifically replicates in solid tumors and metastases in live animals. E. coli DH5alpha does not enter tumor cells and suits for being the vector for soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL), which induces apoptosis by activating cell-surface death receptors. With the high 'tumor-targeting' nature, we demonstrate that intratumoral (i.t.) and intravenous injection of sTRAIL-expressing E. coli DH5alpha results in the tumor-targeted release of biologically active molecules, which leads to a dramatic reduction in the tumor growth rate and the prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. TRAIL delivery by E. coli DH5alpha did not cause any detectable toxicity to any organs, suggesting that E. coli DH5alpha-delivered sTRAIL protein therapy may provide a feasible and effective form of treatment for solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20075981
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8944
      1. Author :
        Hickson, J; Ackler, S; Klaubert, D; Bouska, J; Ellis, P; Foster, K; Oleksijew, A; Rodriguez, L; Schlessinger, S; Wang, B; Frost, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cell death and differentiation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Firefly Luciferin; Humans; Luminescent Agents; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Molecular Imaging; Neoplasms; Oligopeptides; Taxoids
      12. Abstract :
        Apoptosis is a highly regulated process of programmed cell death essential for normal physiology. Dysregulation of apoptosis contributes to the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and chronic heart failure. Quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis in preclinical models would allow for dynamic longitudinal screening of compounds and facilitates a more rapid determination of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we report the in vivo characterization of Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin, a modified firefly luciferase substrate that in apoptotic cells is cleaved by caspase-3 to liberate aminoluciferin, which can be consumed by luciferase to generate a luminescent signal. In two oncology models, namely SKOV3-luc and MDA-MB-231-luc-LN, at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment with docetaxel, animals were injected with Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin and bioluminescent images were acquired. Significantly more light was detected at 24 (P<0.05), 48 (P<0.01), and 72 h (P<0.01) in the docetaxel-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group, with caspase-3 activation at these time points confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Importantly, whereas significant differences between groups were detected as early as 24 h after treatment by molecular imaging, caliper measurements were unable to detect a difference for 4-5 additional days. Taken together, these data show that in vivo imaging of apoptosis using Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin could provide a sensitive and rapid method for early detection of drug efficacy, which could potentially be used by numerous therapeutic programs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20057500
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8950
      1. Author :
        Neal K. Devaraj; Edmund J. Keliher; Greg M. Thurber; Matthias Nahrendorf; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        We report the synthesis and in vivo characterization of an 18F modified trimodal nanoparticle (18F-CLIO). This particle consists of cross-linked dextran held together in core-shell formation by a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and functionalized with the radionuclide 18F in high yield via “click” chemistry. The particle can be detected with positron emission tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The presence of 18F dramatically lowers the detection threshold of the nanoparticles, while the facile conjugation chemistry provides a simple platform for rapid and efficient nanoparticle labeling.
      13. URL :
        http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bc8004649
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4498
      1. Author :
        Neal K. Devaraj; Ralph Weissleder; Scott A. Hilderbrand
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo labelling; breast cancer; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Bioorthogonal tetrazine cycloadditions have been applied to live cell labeling. Tetrazines react irreversibly with the strained dienophile norbornene forming dihydropyrazine products and dinitrogen. The reaction is high yielding, selective, and fast in aqueous media. Her2/neu receptors on live human breast cancer cells were targeted with a monoclonal antibody modified with a norbornene. Tetrazines conjugated to a near-infrared fluorochrome selectively and rapidly label the pretargeted antibody in the presence of serum. These findings indicate that this chemistry is suitable for in vitro labeling experiments, and suggests that it may prove a useful strategy for in vivo pretargeted imaging under numerous modalities.
      13. URL :
        http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bc8004446
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4499
      1. Author :
        Tafreshi, N. K.; Huang, X.; Moberg, V. E.; Barkey, N. M.; Sondak, V. K.; Tian, H.; Morse, D. L.; Vagner, J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjug Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        23
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc
      12. Abstract :
        The incidence of malignant melanoma is rising more rapidly than that of any other cancer in the United States. The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is overexpressed in most human melanoma metastases, thus making it a promising target for imaging and therapy of melanomas. We have previously reported the development of a peptidomimetic ligand with high specificity and affinity for MC1R. Here, we have conjugated near-infrared fluorescent dyes to the C-terminus of this ligand via lysine-mercaptopropionic acid linkers to generate MC1R specific optical probes (MC1RL-800, 0.4 nM K(i); and MC1RL-Cy5, 0.3 nM K(i)). Internalization of the imaging probe was studied in vitro by fluorescence microscopy using engineered A375/MC1R cells and B16F10 cells with endogenous MC1R expression. The in vivo tumor targeting of MC1RL-800 was evaluated by intravenous injection of probe into nude mice bearing bilateral subcutaneous A375 xenograft tumors with low MC1R expression and engineered A375/MC1R tumors with high receptor expression. Melanotic B16F10 xenografts were also studied. Fluorescence imaging showed that the agent has higher uptake values in tumors with high expression compared to low (p < 0.05), demonstrating the effect of expression levels on image contrast-to-noise. In addition, tumor uptake was significantly blocked by coinjection of excess NDP-alpha-MSH peptide (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the MC1R-specific imaging probe developed in this study displays excellent potential for the intraoperative detection of regional node involvement and for margin detection during melanoma metastasis resection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23116461
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10535
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All