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      1. Author :
        Takeshita, Fumitaka; Minakuchi, Yoshiko; Nagahara, Shunji; Honma, Kimi; Sasaki, Hideo; Hirai, Kotaro; Teratani, Takumi; Namatame, Nachi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Hanai, Koji; Kato, Takashi; Sano, Akihiko; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        102
      8. Issue :
        34
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Bone Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Collagen; DNA-Binding Proteins; Drug Carriers; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Gene Therapy; Humans; Luciferases; Male; Mice; PC-3M-luc; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Prostatic Neoplasms; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; RNA, Small Interfering; Transcription Factors
      12. Abstract :
        Silencing of gene expression by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is rapidly becoming a powerful tool for genetic analysis and represents a potential strategy for therapeutic product development. However, there are no reports of systemic delivery for siRNAs toward treatment of bone-metastatic cancer. Accordingly, we report here that i.v. injection of GL3 luciferase siRNA complexed with atelocollagen showed effective reduction of luciferase expression from bone-metastatic prostate tumor cells developed in mouse thorax, jaws, and/or legs. We also show that the siRNA/atelocollagen complex can be efficiently delivered to tumors 24 h after injection and can exist intact at least for 3 days. Furthermore, atelocollagen-mediated systemic administration of siRNAs such as enhancer of zeste homolog 2 and phosphoinositide 3'-hydroxykinase p110-alpha-subunit, which were selected as candidate targets for inhibition of bone metastasis, resulted in an efficient inhibition of metastatic tumor growth in bone tissues. In addition, upregulation of serum IL-12 and IFN-alpha levels was not associated with the in vivo administration of the siRNA/atelocollagen complex. Thus, for treatment of bone metastasis of prostate cancer, an atelocollagen-mediated systemic delivery method could be a reliable and safe approach to the achievement of maximal function of siRNA.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16091473
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8979
      1. Author :
        Singh, Abhinav; Massoud, Tarik F; Deroose, Christophe; Gambhir, Sanjiv S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Seminars in nuclear medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Genes, Reporter; Humans; Male; Molecular Probe Techniques; Neoplasm Proteins; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Tumor Markers, Biological
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate cancer remains an important and growing health problem. Advances in imaging of prostate cancer may help to achieve earlier and more accurate diagnosis and treatment. We review the various strategies using reporter genes for molecular imaging of prostate cancer. These approaches are emerging as valuable tools for monitoring gene expression in laboratory animals and humans. Further development of more sensitive and selective reporters, combined with improvements in detection technology, will consolidate the position of reporter gene imaging as a versatile method for understanding of intracellular biological processes and the underlying molecular basis of prostate cancer, as well as potentially establishing a future role in the clinical management of patients afflicted with this disease.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18096460
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8966
      1. Author :
        Bisland, Stuart K; Chien, Claudia; Wilson, Brian C; Burch, Shane
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aminolevulinic Acid; Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Cell Survival; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Female; Implants, Experimental; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Methylene Blue; Osteomyelitis; Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Osteomyelitis can lead to severe morbidity and even death resulting from an acute or chronic inflammation of the bone and contiguous structures due to fungal or bacterial infection. Incidence approximates 1 in 1000 neonates and 1 in 5000 children in the United States annually and increases up to 0.36% and 16% in adults with diabetes or sickle cell anaemia, respectively. Current regimens of treatment include antibiotics and/or surgery. However, the increasing number of antibiotic resistant pathogens suggests that alternate strategies are required. We are investigating photodynamic therapy (PDT) as one such alternate treatment for osteomyelitis using a bioluminescent strain of biofilm-producing staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) grown onto kirschner wires (K-wire). S. aureus-coated K-wires were exposed to methylene blue (MB) or 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT either in vitro or following implant into the tibial medullary cavity of Sprague-Dawley rats. The progression of S. aureus biofilm was monitored non-invasively using bioluminescence and expressed as a percentage of the signal for each sample immediately prior to treatment. S. aureus infections were subject to PDT 10 days post inoculation. Treatment comprised administration of ALA (300 mg kg(-1)) intraperitoneally followed 4 h later by light (635 +/- 10 nm; 75 J cm(-2)) delivered transcutaneously via an optical fiber placed onto the tibia and resulted in significant delay in bacterial growth. In vitro, MB and ALA displayed similar cell kill with > or =4 log(10) cell kill. In vivo, ALA-mediated PDT inhibited biofilm implants in bone. These results confirm that MB or ALA-mediated PDT have potential to treat S. aureus cultures grown in vitro or in vivo using an animal model of osteomyelitis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16395425
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9054
      1. Author :
        Lambrechts, Saskia A G; Demidova, Tatiana N; Aalders, Maurice C G; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Burns; Mice; Photochemotherapy; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell death. We used PDT mediated by meso-mono-phenyl-tri(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (PTMPP) to treat burn wounds in mice with established Staphylococcus aureus infections The third degree burn wounds were infected with bioluminescent S. aureus. PDT was applied after one day of bacterial growth by adding a 25% DMSO/500 microM PTMPP solution to the wound followed by illumination with red light and periodic imaging of the mice using a sensitive camera to detect the bioluminescence. More than 98% of the bacteria were eradicated after a light dose of 210 J cm(-2) in the presence of PTMPP. However, bacterial re-growth was observed. Light alone or PDT both delayed the wound healing. These data suggest that PDT has the potential to rapidly reduce the bacterial load in infected burns. The treatment needs to be optimized to reduce wound damage and prevent recurrence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15986057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9993
      1. Author :
        Yigit, M. V.; Ghosh, S. K.; Kumar, M.; Petkova, V.; Kavishwar, A.; Moore, A.; Medarova, Z.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Oncogene
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Metastases, and not the primary tumor from which they originate, are the main reason for mortality from carcinoma. Although the molecular mechanisms behind metastasis are poorly understood, it is clear that epigenetic dysregulation at the level of microRNA expression is a key characteristic of the metastatic process that can be exploited for therapy. Here, we describe an miRNA-targeted therapeutic approach for the prevention and arrest of lymph node metastasis. Therapy relies on the inhibition of the pro-metastatic microRNA-10b. It is delivered to primary and lymph node metastatic tumor cells using an imaging-capable nanodrug that is designed to specifically home to these tissues. Treatment of invasive human breast tumor cells (MDA-MB-231) with the nanodrug in vitro downregulates miR-10b and abolishes the invasion and migration of the tumor cells. After intravenous delivery to mice bearing orthotopic MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2LN tumors, the nanodrug accumulates in the primary tumor and lymph nodes. When treatment is initiated before metastasis to lymph nodes, metastasis is prevented. Treatment after the formation of lymph node metastases arrests the metastatic process without a concomitant effect on primary tumor growth raising the possibility of a context-dependent variation in miR-10b breast oncogenesis.Oncogene advance online publication, 14 May 2012; doi:10.1038/onc.2012.173.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22580603
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10505
      1. Author :
        Zhang, H; Fagan, D H; Zeng, X; Freeman, K T; Sachdev, D; Yee, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Oncogene
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Female; Humans; Insulin; Lung Neoplasms; Lymphangiogenesis; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms, Experimental; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Phosphorylation; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; Receptor, Insulin; RNA, Small Interfering; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
      12. Abstract :
        Insulin receptor (IR) and the type I IGF receptor (IGF1R) are structurally and functionally related. The function of IGF1R in cancer has been well documented and anti-IGF1R strategies to treat cancer have shown initial positive results. However, the role of IR in tumor biology, independent of IGF1R, is less clear. To address this issue, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to specifically downregulate IR in two cancer cell lines, LCC6 and T47D. Cells with reduced IR showed reduced insulin-stimulated Akt activation, without affecting IGF1R activation. Cells with reduced IR formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent conditions. LCC6 IR shRNA xenograft tumors in mice had reduced growth, angiogenesis and lymphangiogensis when compared with LCC6 wild-type cells. Accordingly, LCC6 IR shRNA clones produced less hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and VEGF-D. Furthermore, LCC6 IR shRNA cells formed fewer pulmonary metastases when compared with LCC6 wild-type cells. Using in vivo luciferase imaging, we have shown that LCC6 IR shRNA cells have less seeding and colonization potential in the lung and liver of mice than LCC6 cells. In conclusion, downregulation of IR inhibited cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and metastasis. Our data argue that IR should also be targeted in cancer therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20154728
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8986
      1. Author :
        Thobe, M N; Gurusamy, D; Pathrose, P; Waltz, S E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Oncogene
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antigens, CD31; Bioware; Blotting, Western; Cell Line; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Chemokine CXCL1; Chemokine CXCL5; Chemokines; Endothelial Cells; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Interleukin-8; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasms, Experimental; Neovascularization, Pathologic; NF-kappa B; PC-3M-luc2; Prostatic Neoplasms; Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; RNA Interference; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        Overexpression of the Ron receptor tyrosine kinase has recently been shown in a wide variety of human cancers. However, no studies have examined Ron receptor expression or function during prostate tumorigenesis. In this study we report that Ron is highly expressed in human prostate adenocarcinoma and metastatic lymph nodes when compared with normal prostate or benign prostate hyperplasia. Furthermore, we show that Ron is overexpressed in PC-3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines, and that the levels of angiogenic chemokines produced by prostate cancer cells positively correlate with Ron expression. The knockdown of Ron in PC-3 or DU145 cells results in a significant decrease in angiogenic chemokine production and is associated with a decreased activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Moreover, exogenous overexpression of Ron in LNCaP cells is sufficient to induce a significant increase in angiogenic chemokines that can be abrogated by inhibition of NF-kappaB signaling. Given that the function of angiogenic chemokines is important in the development of new blood vessels, we also examined the ability of Ron to modulate endothelial cell migration. Our data show that knockdown of Ron in prostate cancer cells results in significantly less endothelial cell chemotaxis when compared with Ron-expressing cells in vitro as well as in reduced tumor growth and decreased microvessel density after orthotopic transplantation into the prostate in vivo. In total, our data suggest that the Ron receptor is important in modulating prostate tumor growth by modulating angiogenic chemokine production and subsequent endothelial cell recruitment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19838218
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8943
      1. Author :
        Heit, Bryan; Robbins, Stephen M; Downey, Charlene M; Guan, Zhiwen; Colarusso, Pina; Miller, B Joan; Jirik, Frank R; Kubes, Paul
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Nature immunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Arthritis, Experimental; Bioware; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Humans; Inflammation; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Neutrophils; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates; Protein Transport; PTEN Phosphohydrolase; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Neutrophils encounter and 'prioritize' many chemoattractants in their pursuit of bacteria. Here we tested the possibility that the phosphatase PTEN is responsible for the prioritization of chemoattractants. Neutrophils induced chemotaxis by two separate pathways, the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) pathway, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, with the p38 pathway dominating over the PI(3)K pathway. Pten(-/-) neutrophils could not prioritize chemoattractants and were 'distracted' by chemokines when moving toward bacterial chemoattractants. In opposing gradients, PTEN became distributed throughout the cell circumference, which inhibited all PI(3)K activity, thus permitting 'preferential' migration toward bacterial products via phospholipase A(2) and p38. Such prioritization was defective in Pten(-/-) neutrophils, which resulted in defective bacterial clearance in vivo. Our data identify a PTEN-dependent mechanism in neutrophils to prioritize, 'triage' and integrate responses to multiple chemotactic cues.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18536720
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9048
      1. Author :
        Kwong, G. A.; von Maltzahn, G.; Murugappan, G.; Abudayyeh, O.; Mo, S.; Papayannopoulos, I. A.; Sverdlov, D. Y.; Liu, S. B.; Warren, A. D.; Popov, Y.; Schuppan, D.; Bhatia, S. N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Biotechnol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of complex diseases, yet our ability to discover new biomarkers remains limited by our dependence on endogenous molecules. Here we describe the development of exogenously administered 'synthetic biomarkers' composed of mass-encoded peptides conjugated to nanoparticles that leverage intrinsic features of human disease and physiology for noninvasive urinary monitoring. These protease-sensitive agents perform three functions in vivo: they target sites of disease, sample dysregulated protease activities and emit mass-encoded reporters into host urine for multiplexed detection by mass spectrometry. Using mouse models of liver fibrosis and cancer, we show that these agents can noninvasively monitor liver fibrosis and resolution without the need for invasive core biopsies and substantially improve early detection of cancer compared with current clinically used blood biomarkers. This approach of engineering synthetic biomarkers for multiplexed urinary monitoring should be broadly amenable to additional pathophysiological processes and point-of-care diagnostics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242163
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10567
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Nature
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        433
      8. Issue :
        7025
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aging; Animals; Antigens, CD36; Cell Line; Dimerization; Ethylnitrosourea; Gene Deletion; Glycerides; Homozygote; Humans; Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes; Lipopeptides; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mutagenesis; Mutation; Oligopeptides; Peptidoglycan; Phenotype; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Toll-Like Receptors; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; Zymosan
      12. Abstract :
        Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is required for the recognition of numerous molecular components of bacteria, fungi and protozoa. The breadth of the ligand repertoire seems unusual, even if one considers that TLR2 may form heteromers with TLRs 1 and 6 (ref. 12), and it is likely that additional proteins serve as adapters for TLR2 activation. Here we show that an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced nonsense mutation of Cd36 (oblivious) causes a recessive immunodeficiency phenotype in which macrophages are insensitive to the R-enantiomer of MALP-2 (a diacylated bacterial lipopeptide) and to lipoteichoic acid. Homozygous mice are hypersusceptible to Staphylococcus aureus infection. Cd36(obl) macrophages readily detect S-MALP-2, PAM(2)CSK(4), PAM(3)CSK(4) and zymosan, revealing that some--but not all--TLR2 ligands are dependent on CD36. Already known as a receptor for endogenous molecules, CD36 is also a selective and nonredundant sensor of microbial diacylglycerides that signal via the TLR2/6 heterodimer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15690042
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9991
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