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      1. Author :
        Zeng, Q.; Yang, Z.; Gao, Y. J.; Yuan, H.; Cui, K.; Shi, Y.; Wang, H.; Huang, X.; Wong, S. T.; Wang, Y.; Kesari, S.; Ji, R. R.; Xu, X.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        46
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Animals; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/*therapeutic use; Cell Hypoxia/physiology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cyclophosphamide/*therapeutic use; Female; Immunohistochemistry; Lung Neoplasms/prevention & control/secondary; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*drug therapy/genetics/pathology; Mice; Mice, Nude; Sirolimus/*therapeutic use; Tumor Burden; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit the growth of oestrogen positive breast cancer. However, triple-negative (TN) breast cancer is resistant to rapamycin treatment in vitro. We set to test a combination treatment of rapamycin with DNA-damage agent, cyclophosphamide, in a TN breast cancer model. By binding to and disrupting cellular DNA, cyclophosphamide kills cells via interfering with their normal functions. We assessed the responses of nude mice bearing tumour xenografts of TN MDA-MB-231 cells to the combination of rapamycin and cyclophosphamide in both orthotopic mammary and lung-metastasis models. We tracked tumour growth and metastasis by bioluminescent imaging and examined the expression of Ki67, CD34 and HIF-1alpha in tumour tissues by immunohistochemistry and apoptosis index with TUNEL assay, and found that MDA-MB-231 cells are sensitive to rapamycin therapy in orthotopic mammary, but not in lung with metastasis. Rapamycin when combined with cyclophosphamide is found to have a more significant effect in reducing tumour volume and metastasis with a much improved survival rate. Our data also show that the sensitivity of TN tumours to rapamycin is associated with the microenvironment of the tumour cells. The data indicate that in a relatively hypoxic environment HIF-1alpha may play a role in mediating the anti-cancer effect of rapamycin and cyclophosphamide may prevent the feedback activation of Akt by rapamycin. Overall our results show that rapamycin plus cyclophosphamide can achieve an improved efficacy in suppressing tumour growth and metastasis, suggesting that the combination therapy can be a promising treatment option for TN cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20156674
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10414
      1. Author :
        Cheung, R.; Shen, F.; Phillips, J. H.; McGeachy, M. J.; Cua, D. J.; Heyworth, P. G.; Pierce, R. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Clin Invest
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        121
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism; Animals; Cell Differentiation; Concanavalin A/toxicity; Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/etiology; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Immunity, Innate; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism; Lectins, C-Type/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Liver/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Models, Immunological; Myeloid Cells/*immunology/pathology; Nitric Oxide/biosynthesis; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/metabolism; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism; Receptors, Cell Surface/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism; Shock/*etiology/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Signal Transduction; Systemic Inflammatory Response; Syndrome/etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/biosynthesis
      12. Abstract :
        Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a potentially lethal condition, as it can progress to shock, multi-organ failure, and death. It can be triggered by infection, tissue damage, or hemorrhage. The role of tissue injury in the progression from SIRS to shock is incompletely understood. Here, we show that treatment of mice with concanavalin A (ConA) to induce liver injury triggered a G-CSF-dependent hepatic infiltration of CD11b+Gr-1+Ly6G+Ly6C+ immature myeloid cells that expressed the orphan receptor myeloid DAP12-associated lectin-1 (MDL-1; also known as CLEC5A). Activation of MDL-1 using dengue virus or an agonist MDL-1-specific antibody in the ConA-treated mice resulted in shock. The MDL-1+ cells were pathogenic, and in vivo depletion of MDL-1+ cells provided protection. Triggering MDL-1 on these cells induced production of NO and TNF-alpha, which were found to be elevated in the serum of treated mice and required for MDL-1-induced shock. Surprisingly, MDL-1-induced NO and TNF-alpha production required eNOS but not iNOS. Activation of DAP12, DAP10, Syk, PI3K, and Akt was critical for MDL-1-induced shock. In addition, Akt physically interacted with and activated eNOS. Therefore, triggering of MDL-1 on immature myeloid cells and production of NO and TNF-alpha may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of shock. Targeting the MDL-1/Syk/PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway represents a potential new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of SIRS to shock.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22005300
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10421
      1. Author :
        Xie, B. W.; Mol, I. M.; Keereweer, S.; van Beek, E. R.; Que, I.; Snoeks, T. J.; Chan, A.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, ProSense, MMPSense, CRi, Maestro, IVIS Animals; Benzenesulfonates/diagnostic use; Diagnostic Imaging/instrumentation/*methods; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Indoles/diagnostic use; Luminescent Measurements/instrumentation/*methods; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis/pathology; Mice
      12. Abstract :
        Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has shown its appeal as a sensitive technique for in vivo whole body optical imaging. However, the development of injectable tumor-specific near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF) probes makes fluorescence imaging (FLI) a promising alternative to BLI in situations where BLI cannot be used or is unwanted (e.g., spontaneous transgenic tumor models, or syngeneic mice to study immune effects).In this study, we addressed the questions whether it is possible to detect tumor progression using FLI with appropriate sensitivity and how FLI correlates with BLI measurements. In addition, we explored the possibility to simultaneously detect multiple tumor characteristics by dual-wavelength FLI (~700 and ~800 nm) in combination with spectral unmixing. Using a luciferase-expressing 4T1-luc2 mouse breast cancer model and combinations of activatable and targeting NIRF probes, we showed that the activatable NIRF probes (ProSense680 and MMPSense680) and the targeting NIRF probes (IRDye 800CW 2-DG and IRDye 800CW EGF) were either activated by or bound to 4T1-luc2 cells. In vivo, we implanted 4T1-luc2 cells orthotopically in nude mice and were able to follow tumor progression longitudinally both by BLI and dual-wavelength FLI. We were able to reveal different probe signals within the tumor, which co-localized with immuno-staining. Moreover, we observed a linear correlation between the internal BLI signals and the FLI signals obtained from the NIRF probes. Finally, we could detect pulmonary metastases both by BLI and FLI and confirmed their presence histologically.Taken together, these data suggest that dual-wavelength FLI is a feasible approach to simultaneously detect different features of one tumor and to follow tumor progression with appropriate specificity and sensitivity. This study may open up new perspectives for the detection of tumors and metastases in various experimental models and could also have clinical applications, such as image-guided surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22348134
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10426
      1. Author :
        Tseng, J. C.; Granot, T.; DiGiacomo, V.; Levin, B.; Meruelo, D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, IVIS, Alphavirus Infections/pathology/*therapy/virology; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use; Blotting, Western; Cell Membrane Permeability; Combined Modality Therapy; Cricetinae; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; *Genetic Vectors; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neovascularization, Pathologic/*prevention & control; Neuroblastoma/blood supply/therapy/virology; *Oncolytic Virotherapy; Ovarian Neoplasms/*blood supply/*therapy/virology; Paclitaxel/therapeutic use; Sindbis Virus/*physiology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19798121
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10442
      1. Author :
        Hertlein, T.; Sturm, V.; Kircher, S.; Basse-Lusebrink, T.; Haddad, D.; Ohlsen, K.; Jakob, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Animals; Female; Magnetic Resonance Imaging/*methods; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Staphylococcal Infections/*pathology; Staphylococcus aureus/*pathogenicity; Thigh/*microbiology/*pathology
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: During the last years, (19)F-MRI and perfluorocarbon nanoemulsion (PFC) emerged as a powerful contrast agent based MRI methodology to track cells and to visualize inflammation. We applied this new modality to visualize deep tissue abscesses during acute and chronic phase of inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, a murine thigh infection model was used to induce abscess formation and PFC or CLIO (cross linked ironoxides) was administered during acute or chronic phase of inflammation. 24 h after inoculation, the contrast agent accumulation was imaged at the site of infection by MRI. Measurements revealed a strong accumulation of PFC at the abscess rim at acute and chronic phase of infection. The pattern was similar to CLIO accumulation at chronic phase and formed a hollow sphere around the edema area. Histology revealed strong influx of neutrophils at the site of infection and to a smaller extend macrophages during acute phase and strong influx of macrophages at chronic phase of inflammation. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We introduce (19)F-MRI in combination with PFC nanoemulsions as a new platform to visualize abscess formation in a murine thigh infection model of S. aureus. The possibility to track immune cells in vivo by this modality offers new opportunities to investigate host immune response, the efficacy of antibacterial therapies and the influence of virulence factors for pathogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21455319
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10451
      1. Author :
        Evans, L.; Williams, A. S.; Hayes, A. J.; Jones, S. A.; Nowell, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Rheum
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        63
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Acrylamides/pharmacology/*therapeutic use; Animals; Arthritis, Experimental/*drug therapy/metabolism/pathology; Cartilage/*metabolism/pathology; Fibroblasts/metabolism/pathology; Humans; Inflammation/metabolism/pathology; Leukocytes/*drug effects/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase/*antagonists & inhibitors; Piperidines/pharmacology/*therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: To assess the ability of pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) to regulate inflammation and degradative processes in inflammatory arthritis, using the small molecule inhibitor APO866 in human fibroblasts in vitro and in murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). METHODS: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to examine regulation of expression of metalloproteinases and chemokines in human fibroblasts. The role of PBEF was further examined using APO866 in mice with CIA, with effects on disease activity assessed using radiography, histology, in vivo imaging, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). RESULTS: In vitro activation of human fibroblasts with PBEF promoted expression of matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), CCL2, and CXCL8, an effect inhibited by APO866. In mice with CIA, early intervention with APO866 inhibited synovial inflammation, including chemokine-directed leukocyte infiltration, and reduced a systemic marker of inflammation, serum hyaluronic acid. APO866 blockade led to reduced expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in joint extracts and to a reduction in a systemic marker of cartilage erosion, serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein. Radiologic images revealed that APO866 protected against bone erosion, while qPCR demonstrated inhibition of RANKL expression. In mice with established disease, APO866 reduced synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction, and halted bone erosion. In addition, APO866 reduced the activity of MMP-3, CCL2, and RANKL in vivo, and inhibited production of CCL2 and RANKL in synovial explants from arthritic mice, a result that was reversed with nicotinamide mononucleotide. CONCLUSION: These findings confirm PBEF to be an important regulator of inflammation, cartilage catabolism, and bone erosion, and highlight APO866 as a promising therapeutic agent for targeting PBEF activity in inflammatory arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21400478
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10460
      1. Author :
        Chen, Y.; Jacamo, R.; Shi, Y. X.; Wang, R. Y.; Battula, V. L.; Konoplev, S.; Strunk, D.; Hofmann, N. A.; Reinisch, A.; Konopleva, M.; Andreeff, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, IVIS, Animals; Bone Marrow Cells/*cytology/metabolism/physiology; Bone Marrow Transplantation/*methods/physiology; Cells, Cultured; Cellular Microenvironment/genetics/*physiology; Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics/metabolism; Interleukin Receptor Common gamma Subunit/genetics; Mice; Mice, Inbred NOD; Mice, SCID; Mice, Transgenic; Models, Animal; Osteogenesis/genetics/physiology; Species Specificity; *Transplantation, Heterotopic
      12. Abstract :
        The interactions between hematopoietic cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment play a critical role in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and drug resistance. These interactions within the BM niche are unique and could be important for developing new therapies. Here, we describe the development of extramedullary bone and bone marrow using human mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial colony-forming cells implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. We demonstrate the engraftment of human normal and leukemic cells engraft into the human extramedullary bone marrow. When normal hematopoietic cells are engrafted into the model, only discrete areas of the BM are hypoxic, whereas leukemia engraftment results in widespread severe hypoxia, just as recently reported by us in human leukemias. Importantly, the hematopoietic cell engraftment could be altered by genetical manipulation of the bone marrow microenvironment: Extramedullary bone marrow in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was knocked down in mesenchymal stromal cells by lentiviral transfer of short hairpin RNA showed significant reduction (50% +/- 6%; P = .0006) in human leukemic cell engraftment. These results highlight the potential of a novel in vivo model of human BM microenvironment that can be genetically modified. The model could be useful for the study of leukemia biology and for the development of novel therapeutic modalities aimed at modifying the hematopoietic microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22490334
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10465
      1. Author :
        Abdelwahab, M. G.; Fenton, K. E.; Preul, M. C.; Rho, J. M.; Lynch, A.; Stafford, P.; Scheck, A. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        GL261-luc2, IVIS, 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid/metabolism; Animals; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Brain/metabolism/pathology; Combined Modality Therapy; Disease Models, Animal; Glioma/*diet therapy/*radiotherapy; Humans; Kaplan-Meier Estimate; *Ketogenic Diet; Ketones/blood; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Neoplasm Transplantation; Time Factors
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION: The ketogenic diet (KD) is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that alters metabolism by increasing the level of ketone bodies in the blood. KetoCal(R) (KC) is a nutritionally complete, commercially available 4:1 (fat:carbohydrate+protein) ketogenic formula that is an effective non-pharmacologic treatment for the management of refractory pediatric epilepsy. Diet-induced ketosis causes changes to brain homeostasis that have potential for the treatment of other neurological diseases such as malignant gliomas. METHODS: We used an intracranial bioluminescent mouse model of malignant glioma. Following implantation animals were maintained on standard diet (SD) or KC. The mice received 2x4 Gy of whole brain radiation and tumor growth was followed by in vivo imaging. RESULTS: Animals fed KC had elevated levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate (p = 0.0173) and an increased median survival of approximately 5 days relative to animals maintained on SD. KC plus radiation treatment were more than additive, and in 9 of 11 irradiated animals maintained on KC the bioluminescent signal from the tumor cells diminished below the level of detection (p<0.0001). Animals were switched to SD 101 days after implantation and no signs of tumor recurrence were seen for over 200 days. CONCLUSIONS: KC significantly enhances the anti-tumor effect of radiation. This suggests that cellular metabolic alterations induced through KC may be useful as an adjuvant to the current standard of care for the treatment of human malignant gliomas.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22563484
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10485
      1. Author :
        Cronin, M.; Akin, A. R.; Collins, S. A.; Meganck, J.; Kim, J. B.; Baban, C. K.; Joyce, S. A.; van Dam, G. M.; Zhang, N.; van Sinderen, D.; O'Sullivan, G. C.; Kasahara, N.; Gahan, C. G.; Francis, K. P.; Tangney, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        HCT-116-luc2, IVIS, Bioware, HCT116-luc2, Administration, Oral; Animals; Bacteria/*genetics; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Genes, Reporter/genetics; Genetic Engineering; Glioblastoma/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Luminescent Measurements/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/*microbiology/pathology/radiography; Mice; Molecular Imaging/*methods; X-Ray Microtomography
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to track microbes in real time in vivo is of enormous value for preclinical investigations in infectious disease or gene therapy research. Bacteria present an attractive class of vector for cancer therapy, possessing a natural ability to grow preferentially within tumours following systemic administration. Bioluminescent Imaging (BLI) represents a powerful tool for use with bacteria engineered to express reporter genes such as lux. BLI is traditionally used as a 2D modality resulting in images that are limited in their ability to anatomically locate cell populations. Use of 3D diffuse optical tomography can localize the signals but still need to be combined with an anatomical imaging modality like micro-Computed Tomography (muCT) for interpretation.In this study, the non-pathogenic commensal bacteria E. coli K-12 MG1655 and Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003, or Salmonella Typhimurium SL7207 each expressing the luxABCDE operon were intravenously (i.v.) administered to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c) FLuc-expressing xenograft tumours. Bacterial lux signal was detected specifically in tumours of mice post i.v.-administration and bioluminescence correlated with the numbers of bacteria recovered from tissue. Through whole body imaging for both lux and FLuc, bacteria and tumour cells were co-localised. 3D BLI and muCT image analysis revealed a pattern of multiple clusters of bacteria within tumours. Investigation of spatial resolution of 3D optical imaging was supported by ex vivo histological analyses. In vivo imaging of orally-administered commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) was also achieved using 3D BLI. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential to simultaneously image multiple BLI reporter genes three dimensionally in vivo using approaches that provide unique information on spatial locations.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22295120
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10496
      1. Author :
        Phillips, W. T.; Goins, B.; Bao, A.; Vargas, D.; Guttierez, J. E.; Trevino, A.; Miller, J. R.; Henry, J.; Zuniga, R.; Vecil, G.; Brenner, A. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neuro Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        416-25
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        U-87 MG-luc2, U-87-MG-luc2, Glioma, Bioware, IVIS, Animals; Brachytherapy/*methods; Brain Neoplasms/pathology/*radiotherapy; Convection; Glioblastoma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Glioma/pathology/*radiotherapy; Liposomes; Nanoparticles/therapeutic use; Radioisotopes/*therapeutic use; Rats; Rhenium/*therapeutic use; Tumor Burden; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Although external beam radiation is an essential component to the current standard treatment of primary brain tumors, its application is limited by toxicity at doses more than 80 Gy. Recent studies have suggested that brachytherapy with liposomally encapsulated radionuclides may be of benefit, and we have reported methods to markedly increase the specific activity of rhenium-186 ((186)Re)-liposomes. To better characterize the potential delivery, toxicity, and efficacy of the highly specific activity of (186)Re-liposomes, we evaluated their intracranial application by convection-enhanced delivery in an orthotopic U87 glioma rat model. After establishing an optimal volume of 25 microL, we observed focal activity confined to the site of injection over a 96-hour period. Doses of up to 1850 Gy were administered without overt clinical or microscopic evidence of toxicity. Animals treated with (186)Re-liposomes had a median survival of 126 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.4-173 days), compared with 49 days (95% CI, 44-53 days) for controls. Log-rank analysis between these 2 groups was highly significant (P = .0013) and was even higher when 100 Gy was used as a cutoff (P < .0001). Noninvasive luciferase imaging as a surrogate for tumor volume showed a statistically significant separation in bioluminescence by 11 days after 100 Gy or less treatment between the experimental group and the control animals (chi(2)[1, N= 19] = 4.8; P = .029). MRI also supported this difference in tumor size. Duplication of tumor volume differences and survival benefit was possible in a more invasive U251 orthotopic model, with clear separation in bioluminescence at 6 days after treatment (chi(2)[1, N= 9] = 4.7; P = .029); median survival in treated animals was not reached at 120 days because lack of mortality, and log-rank analysis of survival was highly significant (P = .0057). Analysis of tumors by histology revealed minimal areas of necrosis and gliosis. These results support the potential efficacy of the highly specific activity of brachytherapy by (186)Re-liposomes convection-enhanced delivery in glioma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22427110
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10500
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