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      1. Author :
        Themelis, G.; Harlaar, N. J.; Kelder, W.; Bart, J.; Sarantopoulos, A.; van Dam, G. M.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Ann Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescence; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Humans; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Luciferases/metabolism; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Nude; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: This study was designed to improve the surgical procedure and outcome of cancer surgery by means of real-time molecular imaging feedback of tumor spread and margin delineation using targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes with specificity to tumor biomarkers. Surgical excision of cancer often is confronted with difficulties in the identification of cancer spread and the accurate delineation of tumor margins. Currently, the assessment of tumor borders is afforded by postoperative pathology or, less reliably, intraoperative frozen sectioning. Fluorescence imaging is a natural modality for intraoperative use by directly relating to the surgeon's vision and offers highly attractive characteristics, such as high-resolution, sensitivity, and portability. Via the use of targeted probes it also becomes highly tumor-specific and can lead to significant improvements in surgical procedures and outcome. METHODS: Mice bearing xenograft human tumors were injected with alphavbeta3-integrin receptor-targeted fluorescent probe and in vivo visualized by using a novel, real-time, multispectral fluorescence imaging system. Confirmatory ex vivo imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and histopathology were used to validate the in vivo findings. RESULTS: Fluorescence images were all in good correspondence with the confirming bioluminescence images in respect to signal colocalization. Fluorescence imaging detected all tumors and successfully guided total tumor excision by effectively detecting small tumor residuals, which occasionally were missed by the surgeon. Tumor tissue exhibited target-to-background ratio of ~4.0, which was significantly higher compared with white-light images representing the visual contrast. Histopathology confirmed the capability of the method to identify tumor negative margins with high specificity and better prediction rate compared with visual inspection. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time multispectral fluorescence imaging using tumor specific molecular probes is a promising modality for tumor excision by offering real time feedback to the surgeon in the operating room.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21509632
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10381
      1. Author :
        van Staden, A. D.; Brand, A. M.; Dicks, L. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Appl Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Aims: To determine if nisin F-loaded self-setting brushite cement could control the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in vivo. Methods and Results: Brushite cement was prepared by mixing equimolar concentrations of beta-tricalcium phosphate and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. Nisin F was added at 5.0%, 2.5% and 1.0% (w/w) and the cement moulded into cylinders. In vitro antibacterial activity was determined using a delayed agar diffusion assay. Release of nisin F from the cement was determined using BCA protein assays. Based on scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, nisin F did not cause significant changes in cement structure or chemistry. Cement containing 5.0% (w/w) nisin F yielded the most promising in vitro results. Nisin F-loaded cement was implanted into a subcutaneous pocket on the back of mice and then infected with S. aureus Xen 36. Infection was monitored for 7 days, using an in vivo imaging system. Nisin F prevented S. aureus infection for 7 days and no viable cells were isolated from the implants. Conclusions: Nisin F-loaded brushite cement successfully prevented in vivo growth of S. aureus. Significance and Impact of the Study: Nisin F incorporated into bone cement may be used to control S. aureus infection in vivo. (c) 2012The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology (c) 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22268790
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10402
      1. Author :
        Earley, S.; Vinegoni, C.; Dunham, J.; Gorbatov, R.; Feruglio, P. F.; Weissleder, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Annexin Vivo, Annexin-Vivo, Aniline Compounds/*pharmacology; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/*pharmacology; *Apoptosis; Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Green Fluorescent Proteins; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Mice; Mice, Nude; Mitochondrial Membranes/drug effects/*physiology; Mitochondrial Proteins/metabolism; Molecular Imaging/*methods; Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy/*physiopathology; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/antagonists & inhibitors; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism; Single-Cell Analysis; Sulfonamides/*pharmacology; Tumor Microenvironment
      12. Abstract :
        Observing drug responses in the tumor microenvironment in vivo can be technically challenging. As a result, cellular responses to molecularly targeted cancer drugs are often studied in cell culture, which does not accurately represent the behavior of cancer cells growing in vivo. Using high-resolution microscopy and fluorescently labeled genetic reporters for apoptosis, we developed an approach to visualize drug-induced cell death at single-cell resolution in vivo. Stable expression of the mitochondrial intermembrane protein IMS-RP was established in human breast and pancreatic cancer cells. Image analysis was then used to quantify release of IMS-RP into the cytoplasm upon apoptosis and irreversible mitochondrial permeabilization. Both breast and pancreatic cancer cells showed higher basal apoptotic rates in vivo than in culture. To study drug-induced apoptosis, we exposed tumor cells to navitoclax (ABT-263), an inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-w, both in vitro and in vivo. Although the tumors responded to Bcl-2 inhibition in vivo, inducing apoptosis in around 20% of cancer cells, the observed response was much higher in cell culture. Together, our findings show an imaging technique that can be used to directly visualize cell death within the tumor microenvironment in response to drug treatment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22505651
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10433
      1. Author :
        Wen, D.; Qing, L.; Harrison, G.; Golub, E.; Akintoye, S. O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Oral Dis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        427-32
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Maestro, Animals; Bone Density Conservation Agents/administration & dosage/*pharmacokinetics; Bone and Bones/*metabolism; Calcium/metabolism; Chelating Agents; Decalcification Technique; Diphosphonates/administration & dosage/*pharmacokinetics; Durapatite/metabolism; Edetic Acid; Female; Femur/metabolism; Fibula/metabolism; Fluorescent Dyes/diagnostic use; Fluorometry; Humerus/metabolism; Injections, Intravenous; Mandible/metabolism; Models, Animal; Radius/metabolism; Rats; Rats, Nude; Spectrophotometry, Atomic; Tibia/metabolism; Tissue Distribution; Ulna/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: Bisphosphonates commonly used to treat osteoporosis, Paget's disease, multiple myeloma, hypercalcemia of malignancy and osteolytic lesions of cancer metastasis have been associated with bisphosphonate-associated jaw osteonecrosis (BJON). The underlying pathogenesis of BJON is unclear, but disproportionate bisphosphonate concentration in the jaw has been proposed as one potential etiological factor. This study tested the hypothesis that skeletal biodistribution of intravenous bisphosphonate is anatomic site-dependent in a rat model system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fluorescently labeled pamidronate was injected intravenously in athymic rats of equal weights followed by in vivo whole body fluorimetry, ex vivo optical imaging of oral, axial, and appendicular bones and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid bone decalcification to assess hydroxyapatite-bound bisphosphonate. RESULTS: Bisphosphonate uptake and bisphosphonate released per unit calcium were similar in oral and appendicular bones but lower than those in axial bones. Hydroxyapatite-bound bisphosphonate liberated by sequential acid decalcification was the highest in oral, relative to axial and appendicular bones (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates regional differences in uptake and release of bisphosphonate from oral, axial, and appendicular bones of immune deficient rats.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21122034
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10467
      1. Author :
        Comenge, J.; Sotelo, C.; Romero, F.; Gallego, O.; Barnadas, A.; Parada, T. G.; Dominguez, F.; Puntes, V. F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as a potential tool to improve cancer treatment. Among the proposed uses in imaging and therapy, their use as a drug delivery scaffold has been extensively highlighted. However, there are still some controversial points which need a deeper understanding before clinical application can occur. Here the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to detoxify the antitumoral agent cisplatin, linked to a nanoparticle via a pH-sensitive coordination bond for endosomal release, is presented. The NP conjugate design has important effects on pharmacokinetics, conjugate evolution and biodistribution and results in an absence of observed toxicity. Besides, AuNPs present unique opportunities as drug delivery scaffolds due to their size and surface tunability. Here we show that cisplatin-induced toxicity is clearly reduced without affecting the therapeutic benefits in mice models. The NPs not only act as carriers, but also protect the drug from deactivation by plasma proteins until conjugates are internalized in cells and cisplatin is released. Additionally, the possibility to track the drug (Pt) and vehicle (Au) separately as a function of organ and time enables a better understanding of how nanocarriers are processed by the organism.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23082177
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10522
      1. Author :
        Daugimont, L.; Vandermeulen, G.; Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Mir, L. M.; Bouquet, C.; Feron, O.; Preat, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Pharm Biopharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        78
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Despite the discovery of novel inhibitors of tumor angiogenesis, protein-based antiangiogenic cancer therapy suffers some limitations that antiangiogenic gene therapy could overcome. We investigated whether intra-tumoral electrotransfer of three angiogenic plasmids could inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. METHODS: Plasmids encoding recombinant disintegrin domain of ADAM-15 (RDD), thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1), and the soluble isoform of the VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1) were injected into B16F10 melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 mice followed by electroporation. Tumor volume was measured daily using a digital caliper. Metastasis was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence after surgical removal of the primary luciferase-encoding B16F10 tumor 5 days after intra-tumoral electrotransfer. Markers of vascularization and cell proliferation were quantified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the antiangiogenic plasmids induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth, doubling of mean survival time and long-term survivors ( approximately 40% vs 0% in control). When the tumor was removed by surgery after intra-tumoral plasmid electrotransfer, a significant decrease in tumor metastasis was observed leading to long-term tumor-free survival especially after treatment with pRDD plasmid (84% vs 0% in control). Unlike pTSP-1 and psFlt-1, pRDD significantly decreased cell proliferation in B16F10 primary tumors which express alphavbeta3 and alpha5beta1 integrins. No effect of antiangiogenic plasmid electrotransfer on normal skin blood flow was detected. CONCLUSION: The intra-tumoral electrotransfer of the three antiangiogenic plasmids is a promising method for the treatment of melanoma. The plasmid encoding RDD seems to be particularly effective due to its direct antitumoral activity combined with angiogenesis suppression, and its marked inhibition of metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21316447
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10353
      1. Author :
        Herzog, E.; Taruttis, A.; Beziere, N.; Lutich, A. A.; Razansky, D.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Radiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        263
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adenocarcinoma/*diagnosis; Animals; Colonic Neoplasms/*diagnosis; Contrast Media/pharmacokinetics; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/pharmacokinetics; Gold/pharmacokinetics; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Indocyanine Green/pharmacokinetics; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis; Mice; Nanoparticles; Spectrum Analysis/methods; Tomography, Optical/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To investigate whether multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) can reveal the heterogeneous distributions of exogenous agents of interest and vascular characteristics through tumors of several millimeters in diameter in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Procedures involving animals were approved by the government of Upper Bavaria. Imaging of subcutaneous tumors in mice was performed by using an experimental MSOT setup that produces transverse images at 10 frames per second with an in-plane resolution of approximately 150 mum. To study dynamic contrast enhancement, three mice with 4T1 tumors were imaged before and immediately, 20 minutes, 4 hours, and 24 hours after systemic injection of indocyanine green (ICG). Epifluorescence imaging was used for comparison. MSOT of a targeted fluorescent agent (6 hours after injection) and hemoglobin oxygenation was performed simultaneously (4T1 tumors: n = 3). Epifluorescence of cryosections served as validation. The accumulation owing to enhanced permeability and retention in tumors (4T1 tumors: n = 4, HT29 tumors: n = 3, A2780 tumors: n = 2) was evaluated with use of long-circulating gold nanorods (before and immediately, 1 hour, 5 hours, and 24 hours after injection). Dark-field microscopy was used for validation. RESULTS: Dynamic contrast enhancement with ICG was possible. MSOT, in contrast to epifluorescence imaging, showed a heterogeneous intratumoral agent distribution. Simultaneous imaging of a targeted fluorescent agent and oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin gave functional information about tumor vasculature in addition to the related agent uptake. The accumulation of gold nanorods in tumors seen at MSOT over time also showed heterogeneous uptake. CONCLUSION: MSOT enables live high-spatial-resolution observations through tumors, producing images of distributions of fluorochromes and nanoparticles as well as tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22517960
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10365
      1. Author :
        Swirski, F. K.; Nahrendorf, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Immunol Cell Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Macrophages are central regulators of disease progression in both atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction (MI). In atherosclerosis, macrophages are the dominant leukocyte population that influences lesional development. In MI, which is caused by atherosclerosis, macrophages accumulate readily and have important roles in inflammation and healing. Molecular imaging has grown considerably as a field and can reveal biological process at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Here, we explore how various imaging modalities, from intravital microscopy in mice to organ-level imaging in patients, are contributing to our understanding of macrophages and their progenitors in cardiovascular disease.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 4 December 2012; doi:10.1038/icb.2012.72.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23207281
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10441
      1. Author :
        Lorenz, U.; Schafer, T.; Ohlsen, K.; Tiurbe, G. C.; Buhler, C.; Germer, C. T.; Kellersmann, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        41
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Acetates; Animals; *Biofilms; Bioprosthesis; Blood Vessel Prosthesis/*microbiology; Cattle; Colony Count, Microbial; Luminescent Measurements/*methods; Mice; Microbial Viability; Pericardium; *Photons; Polyesters; Polytetrafluoroethylene; Prospective Studies; Prosthesis-Related Infections/*diagnosis; Random Allocation; Silver Compounds; Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification/*physiology
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: Biophotonic imaging was compared to standard enumeration method both for counting Staphylococcus aureus in biofilm and bacterial susceptibility tests of different graft materials. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five types of vascular grafts were placed subcutaneously in 35 mice and challenged with bioluminescent S. aureus. The mice were divided into equal groups as follows: group A (polyester), group B (polytetrafluoroethylene), group C and D (two types of silver acetate-coated polyester) and group E (bovine pericardium). Controls were given only the bacteria. The bioluminescence signal of S. aureus, able to predict number of viable bacteria in biofilm without any manipulation, was measured at different time points. Five days postinfection, regular cultures of adherent bacteria on grafts were obtained. Comparative analyses between bioluminescence activity and culture enumeration were performed. RESULTS: The number of viable bacteria on silver-coated prostheses was the slightest, indicating superior bacterial resistance. The density of bacteria on polytetrafluoroethylene and polyester was comparable, with a non-significant advantage for polytetrafluoroethylene. Moreover, bioluminescence detected the number of viable S. aureus in biofilm more exactly compared to enumeration of bacteria. CONCLUSION: Bioluminescence imaging can be considered a useful tool to characterize susceptibility of any graft material to bacterial biofilm prior to implantation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20943422
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10453
      1. Author :
        Ale, A.; Ermolayev, V.; Herzog, E.; Cohrs, C.; de Angelis, M. H.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Methods
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Remodeling; Disease Models, Animal; Equipment Design; Female; Fluorescence; Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/radiography; Mice; Osteogenesis Imperfecta/pathology/radiography; Tomography, Optical/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360 degrees imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561987
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10468
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