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      1. Author :
        Xu, Xiulan; Miller, Sally A; Baysal-Gurel, Fulya; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Rajashekara, Gireesh
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Applied and environmental microbiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        76
      8. Issue :
        12
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Actinomycetales; Bioware; Genes, Reporter; Genetic Engineering; Luminescent Proteins; Lycopersicon esculentum; Mirabilis; Plant Diseases; pXen-13; Recombinant Proteins; Seeds; Staining and Labeling
      12. Abstract :
        Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes wilting and cankers, leading to severe economic losses in commercial tomato production worldwide. The disease is transmitted from infected seeds to seedlings and mechanically from plant to plant during seedling production, grafting, pruning, and harvesting. Because of the lack of tools for genetic manipulation, very little is known regarding the mechanisms of seed and seedling infection and movement of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in grafted plants, two focal points for application of bacterial canker control measures in tomato. To facilitate studies on the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis movement in tomato seed and grafted plants, we isolated a bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strain using the modified Tn1409 containing a promoterless lux reporter. A total of 19 bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis mutants were obtained. All mutants tested induced a hypersensitive response in Mirabilis jalapa and caused wilting of tomato plants. Real-time colonization studies of germinating seeds using a virulent, stable, constitutively bioluminescent strain, BL-Cmm17, showed that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis aggregated on hypocotyls and cotyledons at an early stage of germination. In grafted seedlings in which either the rootstock or scion was exposed to BL-Cmm17 via a contaminated grafting knife, bacteria were translocated in both directions from the graft union at higher inoculum doses. These results emphasize the use of bioluminescent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to help better elucidate the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-tomato plant interactions. Further, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this tool by successful transformation of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis with Tn1409::lux. Thus, our approach would be highly useful to understand the pathogenesis of diseases caused by other subspecies of the agriculturally important C. michiganensis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20400561
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9028
      1. Author :
        Balibar, Carl J; Shen, Xiaoyu; McGuire, Dorothy; Yu, Donghui; McKenney, David; Tao, Jianshi
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Microbiology (Reading, England)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        156
      8. Issue :
        Pt 5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacteriolysis; Bioware; Cell Wall; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Knockout Techniques; Genes, Reporter; Lysostaphin; Mice; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Sepsis; Staphylococcus aureus; Virulence; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Transcriptional profiling data accumulated in recent years for the clinically relevant pathogen Staphylococcus aureus have established a cell wall stress stimulon, which comprises a coordinately regulated set of genes that are upregulated in response to blockage of cell wall biogenesis. In particular, the expression of cwrA (SA2343, N315 notation), which encodes a putative 63 amino acid polypeptide of unknown biological function, increases over 100-fold in response to cell wall inhibition. Herein, we seek to understand the biological role that this gene plays in S. aureus. cwrA was found to be robustly induced by all cell wall-targeting antibiotics tested – vancomycin, oxacillin, penicillin G, phosphomycin, imipenem, hymeglusin and bacitracin – but not by antibiotics with other mechanisms of action, including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, triclosan, rifampicin, novobiocin and carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone. Although a DeltacwrA S. aureus strain had no appreciable shift in MICs for cell wall-targeting antibiotics, the knockout was shown to have reduced cell wall integrity in a variety of other assays. Additionally, the gene was shown to be important for virulence in a mouse sepsis model of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20167623
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9037
      1. Author :
        Baddour, Ralph E; Dadani, Farhan N; Kolios, Michael C; Bisland, Stuart K
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biological physics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        33
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Ultrasound imaging is proving to be an important tool for medical diagnosis of dermatological disease. Backscatter spectral profiles using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS, 10-100 MHz) are sensitive to subtle changes in eukaryotic cellular morphology and mechanical properties that are indicative of early apoptosis, the main type of cell death induced following photodynamic therapy (PDT). We performed experiments to study whether HFUS could also be used to discern changes in bacteria following PDT treatment. Pellets of planktonic Staphylococcus aureus were treated with different PDT protocols and subsequently interrogated with HFUS. Changes in ultrasound backscatter response were found to correlate with antimicrobial effect. Despite their small size, distinct changes in bacterial morphology that are indicative of cell damage or death are detectable by altered backscatter spectra from bacterial ensembles using HFUS. This highlights the potential for HFUS in rapidly and non-invasively assessing the structural changes related to antimicrobial response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19669553
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9052
      1. Author :
        De Kwaadsteniet, Michele
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        N/A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Antibiotics -- Therapeutic use; Bacteriocins; Bioware; Dissertations -- Microbiology; Drug resistance in microorganisms; Nisin; Respiratory infections -- Treatment; Skin -- Infections -- Treatment; Staphylococcus aureus; Theses -- Microbiology; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus is presenting an increasing threat, especially immune compromised individuals. Many of these strains have developed resistance to newly approved drugs such as quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid and daptomycin. The search for alternative treatment, including bacteriocins (ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides) of lactic acid bacteria is increasing . Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis F10, isolated from freshwater catfish, produced a new nisin variant active against clinical strains of S. aureus. The operon encoding nisin F is located on a plasmid and the structural gene has been sequenced. The lantibiotic is closely related to nisin Z, except at position 30 where valine replaced isoleucine. The antimicrobial activity of nisin F against S. aureus was tested in the respiratory tract of Wistar rats. Non-immunosuppressed and immunosuppressed rats were intranasally infected with S. aureus K and then treated with either nisin F or sterile physiological saline. Nisin F protected immunosuppressed rats against S. aureus, as symptoms of an infection were only detected in the trachea and lungs of immunosuppressed rats treated with saline. The safety of intranasally administered nisin F was also evaluated and proved to have no adverse side effects. The potential of nisin F as an antimicrobial agent to treat subcutaneous skin infections was evaluated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with a bioluminescent strain of S. aureus (Xen 36). Immunosuppressed mice were treated with either nisin F or sterile physiological saline 24 h and 48 h after infection with subcutaneously injected S. aureus Xen 36. Histology and bioluminescence flux measurements revealed that nisin F was ineffective in the treatment of deep dermal staphylococcal infections. Non-infected and infected mice treated with nisin F had an influx of polymorphonuclear cells in the deep stroma of the skin tissue. This suggested that nisin F, when injected subcutaneously, may have modulated the immune system. Nisin F proved an effective antimicrobial agent against S. aureus-related infections in the respiratory tract, but not against subcutaneous infections. The outcome of nisin F treatment thus depends on the route of administration and site of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://scholar.sun.ac.za/handle/10019.1/1285
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9042
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research: official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acinetobacter baumannii; Acinetobacter Infections; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colistin; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial; Female; Fractures, Bone; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Osteomyelitis; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Osteomyelitis (OM) from multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter has emerged in >30% of combat-related injuries in Iraq and Afghanistan. While most of these strains are sensitive to colistin, the drug is not available in bone void fillers for local high-dose delivery. To address this, we developed a mouse model with MDR strains isolated from wounded military personnel. In contrast to S. aureus OM, which is osteolytic and characterized by biofilm in necrotic bone, A. baumannii OM results in blastic lesions that do not contain apparent biofilm. We also found that mice mount a specific IgG response against three proteins (40, 47, and 56 kDa) regardless of the strain used, suggesting that these may be immuno-dominant antigens. PCR for the A. baumannii-specific parC gene confirmed a 100% infection rate with 75% of the MDR strains, and in vitro testing confirmed that all strains were sensitive to colistin. We also developed a real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) assay that could detect as few as 10 copies of parC in a sample. To demonstrate the efficacy of colistin prophylaxis in this model, mice were treated with either parenteral colistin (0.2 mg colistinmethate i.m. for 7 days), local colistin (PMMA bead impregnated with 1.0 mg colistin sulfate), or an unloaded PMMA bead control. While the parenteral colistin failed to demonstrate any significant effects versus the placebo, the colistin PMMA bead significantly reduced the infection rate such that only 29.2% of the mice had detectable levels of parC at 19 days (p < 0.05 vs. i.m. colistin and placebo).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19173261
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9043
      1. Author :
        Bisland, Stuart K; Chien, Claudia; Wilson, Brian C; Burch, Shane
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aminolevulinic Acid; Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Cell Survival; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Female; Implants, Experimental; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Methylene Blue; Osteomyelitis; Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Osteomyelitis can lead to severe morbidity and even death resulting from an acute or chronic inflammation of the bone and contiguous structures due to fungal or bacterial infection. Incidence approximates 1 in 1000 neonates and 1 in 5000 children in the United States annually and increases up to 0.36% and 16% in adults with diabetes or sickle cell anaemia, respectively. Current regimens of treatment include antibiotics and/or surgery. However, the increasing number of antibiotic resistant pathogens suggests that alternate strategies are required. We are investigating photodynamic therapy (PDT) as one such alternate treatment for osteomyelitis using a bioluminescent strain of biofilm-producing staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) grown onto kirschner wires (K-wire). S. aureus-coated K-wires were exposed to methylene blue (MB) or 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT either in vitro or following implant into the tibial medullary cavity of Sprague-Dawley rats. The progression of S. aureus biofilm was monitored non-invasively using bioluminescence and expressed as a percentage of the signal for each sample immediately prior to treatment. S. aureus infections were subject to PDT 10 days post inoculation. Treatment comprised administration of ALA (300 mg kg(-1)) intraperitoneally followed 4 h later by light (635 +/- 10 nm; 75 J cm(-2)) delivered transcutaneously via an optical fiber placed onto the tibia and resulted in significant delay in bacterial growth. In vitro, MB and ALA displayed similar cell kill with > or =4 log(10) cell kill. In vivo, ALA-mediated PDT inhibited biofilm implants in bone. These results confirm that MB or ALA-mediated PDT have potential to treat S. aureus cultures grown in vitro or in vivo using an animal model of osteomyelitis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16395425
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9054
      1. Author :
        Ghali, Shadi; Bhatt, Kirit A; Dempsey, Marlese P; Jones, Deidre M; Singh, Sunil; Aarabi, Shahram; Arabi, Shahram; Butler, Peter E; Gallo, Robert L; Gurtner, Geoffrey C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Plastic and reconstructive surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        123
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; Bioware; Cathelicidins; Chronic Disease; Drug Carriers; Genetic Engineering; Male; Rats; Rats, Inbred F344; Surgical Flaps; Wound Infection; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The success of antimicrobial therapy has been impaired by the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. Antimicrobial peptides are ubiquitous proteins that are part of the innate immune system and are successful against such antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The authors have previously demonstrated the feasibility of protein delivery via microvascular free flap gene therapy and here they examine this approach for recalcitrant infections. METHODS The authors investigated the production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide-LL37, delivered by ex vivo transduction of the rodent superficial inferior epigastric free flap with Ad/CMV-LL37. The vascular permeabilizing agent vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was co-administered during ex vivo transduction with adenoviral vectors in an attempt to augment transduction efficiency. A rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infection seeded with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus was used to assess the biological efficacy of delivering therapeutic antimicrobial genes using this technology. RESULTS The authors were successful in demonstrating significant LL37 expression, which persisted for 14 days after ex vivo transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37. Transduction efficiency was significantly improved with the co-administration of 5 micrograms of VEGF during transduction without significantly increasing systemic dissemination of adenovirus or systemic toxicity. They were able to demonstrate in the rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infections a significant reduction in bacterial loads from infected catheters following transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37 and increased bacterial clearance. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates for the first time that microbicidal gene therapy via microvascular free flaps is able to clear chronic infections such as occurs with osteomyelitis resulting from trauma or an infected foreign body [corrected]
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19337084
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9040
      1. Author :
        Gillrie, Mark R; Zbytnuik, Lori; McAvoy, Erin; Kapadia, Roxna; Lee, Kristine; Waterhouse, Christopher C M; Davis, Shevaun P; Muruve, Daniel A; Kubes, Paul; Ho, May
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European journal of immunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        40
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Endothelial Cells; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Humans; Interferon-gamma; Lipopolysaccharides; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Teichoic Acids; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Transplantation Chimera; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The response of leukocytes to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a TLR2-dependent major cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus, is linked to the outcome of an infection. In this study we investigated the role of nonhematopoietic TLR2 in response to LTA and S. aureus by creating bone marrow chimeras. Significant leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA required IFN-gamma priming in WT C57BL/6 and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice, but was not observed in TLR2(-/-) or WT-->TLR2(-/-) animals. LTA also induced a proinflammatory response in IFN-gamma primed primary human microvascular endothelial cells leading to leukocyte recruitment in vitro. When mice were infected with S. aureus, the most profound elevation of TNF-alpha and IL-6 was seen in TLR2(-/-) and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice. TLR2(-/-), but not chimeric mice, demonstrated increased IL-17, blood leukocytosis and pulmonary neutrophilia compared to WT mice. Collectively, the results suggest an essential role for IFN-gamma and nonhematopoietic TLR2 for leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA. In contrast, TLR2 on both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells appears to orchestrate an inhibitory response to S. aureus such that in complete TLR2 deficiency, there is an exaggerated proinflammatory response and/or skewing of the immune response towards a Th17 phenotype that may contribute to the decreased survival of TLR2(-/-) mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20306471
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9036
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        77
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animal Structures; Animals; Antibodies, Bacterial; Antigens, Bacterial; Bacterial Proteins; Bioware; Cell Wall; Colony Count, Microbial; Female; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neutrophils; Opsonin Proteins; Proteome; Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Vaccines, Subunit; Vaccines, Synthetic; Whole Body Imaging; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen with increasing clinical impact due to the extensive spread of antibiotic-resistant strains. Therefore, development of a protective polyvalent vaccine is of great clinical interest. We employed an intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) preparation as a source of antibodies directed against anchorless S. aureus surface proteins for identification of novel vaccine candidates. In order to identify such proteins, subtractive proteome analysis (SUPRA) of S. aureus anchorless cell wall proteins was performed. Proteins reacting with IVIG but not with IVIG depleted of S. aureus-specific opsonizing antibodies were considered vaccine candidates. Nearly 40 proteins were identified by this preselection method using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--time of flight analysis. Three of these candidate proteins, enolase (Eno), oxoacyl reductase (Oxo), and hypothetical protein hp2160, were expressed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins, purified, and used for enrichment of corresponding immunoglobulin Gs from IVIG by affinity chromatography. Use of affinity-purified anti-Eno, anti-Oxo, and anti-hp2160 antibodies resulted in opsonization, phagocytosis, and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. High specific antibody titers were detected in mice immunized with recombinant antigens. In mice challenged with bioluminescent S. aureus, reduced staphylococcal spread was measured by in vivo imaging. The recovery of S. aureus CFU from organs of immunized mice was diminished 10- to 100-fold. Finally, mice immunized with hp2160 displayed statistically significant higher survival rates after lethal challenge with clinically relevant S. aureus strains. Taken together, our data suggest that anchorless cell wall proteins might be promising vaccine candidates and that SUPRA is a valuable tool for their identification.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19364833
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9039
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