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      1. Author :
        Hidemi Hattori, Kaori Higuchi, Yashiro Nogami, Yoshiko Amano, Masayuki Ishihara and Bonpei Takase
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; AngioSense
      12. Abstract :
        Extract:

        With the advent of tissue regeneration and gene therapy for heart disease, evaluation of coronary circulation and cardiac function in vivo, especially in a disease model, is extremely important. Conventional methods such as microcomputed tomography, high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography, and high-resolution ultrasound have become invaluable tools in cardiovascular research. However, the disadvantages and limitations of these approaches sometimes preclude researchers from conducting important and specific studies on coronary circulation and cardiac function. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel real-time, in vivo fluorescent optical imaging system for use in the mouse cardiovascular system. We report the use of this system for repeatedly assessing coronary circulation, cardiovascular structure, and cardiac function in live mice...
      13. URL :
        http://circimaging.ahajournals.org/content/2/3/277.extract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4648
      1. Author :
        Wunder A and Klohs J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Basic Research in Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        103
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; atherosclerosis; bioluminescence imaging; fluorescence imaging; myocardial infarction; stroke; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Pathophysiological processes in the vascular system are the major cause of mortality and disease. Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory process in arterial walls, can lead to formation of plaques, whose rupture can lead to thrombus formation, obstruction of vessels (thrombosis), reduction of the blood flow (ischemia), cell death in the tissue fed by the occluded vessel, and depending on the affected vessel, to myocardial infarction or stroke. Imaging techniques enabling visualization of the biological processes involved in this scenario are therefore highly desirable. In recent years, a number of reporter agents and reporter systems have been developed to visualize these processes using different imaging modalities including nuclear imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. This article comprises a brief overview of optical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and bioluminescence imaging for the visualization of vascular pathophysiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18324374
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4649
      1. Author :
        David E Sosnovik, Matthias Nahrendorf and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Nature Reviews Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; fluorescence imaging, molecular imaging, MRI, myocardium, SPECT; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging agents can be targeted to a specific receptor or protein on the cardiomyocyte surface, or to enzymes released into the interstitial space, such as cathepsins, matrix metalloproteinases and myeloperoxidase. Molecular imaging of the myocardium, however, requires the imaging agent to be small, sensitive (nanomolar levels or better), and able to gain access to the interstitial space. Several novel agents that fulfill these criteria have been used for targeted molecular imaging applications in the myocardium. Magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and single-photon emission CT have been used to image the molecular signals generated by these agents. The use of targeted imaging agents in the myocardium has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of myocardial injury and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2597275/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4650
      1. Author :
        Luker, G.D.; Luker, K.E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Clinical Medicine; Contrast Media; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescence; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; in vivo; in vivo imaging; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Optics and Photonics; Peptide Hydrolases; Rats; Signal Transduction; Software; Tomography, Optical
      12. Abstract :
        Optical techniques, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, are emerging as powerful new modalities for molecular imaging in disease and therapy. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, researchers have developed optical methods for imaging a variety of cellular and molecular processes in vivo, including protein interactions, protein degradation, and protease activity. Whereas optical imaging has been used primarily for research in small-animal models, there are several areas in which optical molecular imaging will translate to clinical medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in optical techniques for molecular imaging and the potential impact for clinical medicine.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18077528
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 7444
      15. Serial :
        4477
      1. Author :
        Takaba, J.; Mishima, Y.; Hatake, K.; Kasahara, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Mediators of Inflammation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2010
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        bone marrow cells; Cancer; cell labeling; in vitro; in vivo imaging; Olympus IV-100; tail vein injection; VivoTag 750
      12. Abstract :
        Mucosal damage is a common side effect of many cancer treatments, especially radiotherapy and intensive chemotherapy, which often induce bone marrow (BM) suppression. We observed that acetic acid- (AA-) induced mucosal damage in the colon of mice was worsened by simultaneous treatment with irradiation or 5-FU. However, irradiation 14 days prior to the AA treatment augmented the recovery from mucosal damage, suggesting that the recovery from BM suppression had an advantageous effect on the mucosal repair. In addition, BM transplantation also augmented the recovery from AA-induced mucosal damage. We further confirmed that transplanted BM-derived cells, particularly F4/80+Gr1+ “inflammatory” monocytes (Subset 1), accumulated in the damaged mucosal area in the early healing phase, and both of Subset 1 and F4/80+Gr1- “resident” monocytes (Subset 2) accumulated in this area in later phases. Our results suggest that monocytes/macrophages contribute to the mucosal recovery and regeneration following mucosal damage by anticancer drug therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21274263
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8445
      15. Serial :
        4808