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      1. Author :
        Elena S. Izmailova; Nancy Paz; Herlen Alencar; Miyoung Chun; Lisa Schopf; Michael Hepperle; Joan H. Lane; Geraldine Harriman; Yajun Xu; Timothy Ocain; Ralph Weissleder; Umar Mahmood; Aileen M. Healy; Bruce Jaffee
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        inflammation; immune response; rheumatoid arthritis; arthritis; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The NF-kappaB signaling pathway promotes the immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in rodent models of RA. NF-kappaB activity is regulated by the IKK-2 kinase during inflammatory responses. To elucidate how IKK-2 inhibition suppresses disease development, we used a combination of in vivo imaging, transcription profiling, and histopathology technologies to study mice with antibody-induced arthritis.

        METHODS: ML120B, a potent, small molecule inhibitor of IKK-2, was administered to arthritic animals, and disease activity was monitored. NF-kappaB activity in diseased joints was quantified by in vivo imaging. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate gene expression in joints. Protease-activated near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) in vivo imaging was applied to assess the amounts of active proteases in the joints.

        RESULTS: Oral administration of ML120B suppressed both clinical and histopathologic manifestations of disease. In vivo imaging demonstrated that NF-kappaB activity in inflamed arthritic paws was inhibited by ML120B, resulting in significant suppression of multiple genes in the NF-kappaB pathway, i.e., KC, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78, JE, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD3, CD68, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 3, cathepsin B, and cathepsin K. NIRF in vivo imaging demonstrated that ML120B treatment dramatically reduced the amount of active proteases in the joints.

        CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that IKK-2 inhibition in the murine model of antibody-induced arthritis suppresses both inflammation and joint destruction. In addition, this study highlights how gene expression profiling can facilitate the identification of surrogate biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in an experimental model of arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.22303/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4511
      1. Author :
        Jeffrey D Peterson; Timothy P LaBranche; Kristine O Vasquez; Sylvie Kossodo; Michele Melton; Randall Rader; John T Listello; Mark A Abrams; Thomas P Misko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Research & Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        optical tomography; in vivo imaging; inflammation; Fluorescence molecular tomographic; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Introduction: Standard measurements used to assess murine models of rheumatoid arthritis, notably paw thickness and clinical score, do not align well with certain aspects of disease severity as assessed by histopathology. We tested the hypothesis that non-invasive optical tomographic imaging of molecular biomarkers of inflammation and bone turnover would provide a superior quantitative readout and would discriminate between a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) and a non-DMARD treatment.

        Methods: Using two protease-activated near-infrared fluorescence imaging agents to detect inflammation-associated cathepsin and matrix metalloprotease activity, and a third agent to detect bone turnover, we quantified fluorescence in paws of mice with collagen antibody-induced arthritis. Fluorescence molecular tomographic (FMT) imaging results, which provided deep tissue detection and quantitative readouts in absolute picomoles of agent fluorescence per paw, were compared with paw swelling, clinical scores, a panel of plasma biomarkers, and histopathology to discriminate between steroid (prednisolone), DMARD (p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor) and non-DMARD (celecoxib, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor) treatments.

        Results: Paw thickness, clinical score, and plasma biomarkers failed to discriminate well between a p38 MAPK inhibitor and a COX-2 inhibitor. In contrast, FMT quantification using near-infrared agents to detect protease activity or bone resorption yielded a clear discrimination between the different classes of therapeutics. FMT results agreed well with inflammation scores, and both imaging and histopathology provided clearer discrimination between treatments as compared with paw swelling, clinical score, and serum biomarker readouts.

        Conclusions: Non-invasive optical tomographic imaging offers a unique approach to monitoring disease pathogenesis and correlates with histopathology assessment of joint inflammation and bone resorption. The specific use of optical tomography allowed accurate three-dimensional imaging, quantitation in picomoles rather than intensity or relative fluorescence, and, for the first time, showed that non-invasive imaging assessment can predict the pathologist's histology inflammation scoring and discriminate DMARD from non-DMARD activity.
      13. URL :
        http://arthritis-research.com/content/12/3/R105
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4513
      1. Author :
        Jan Grimm; David G. Kirsch; Stephen D. Windsor; Carla F. Bender Kim; Philip M. Santiago; Vasilis Ntziachristos; Tyler Jacks; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        PNAS
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        102
      8. Issue :
        40
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        gene expression profiling; lung cancer; immunohistochemistry; Western blotting; in vivo imaging; moleuclar imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        Using gene expression profiling, we identified cathepsin cysteine proteases as highly up-regulated genes in a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Overexpression of cathepsin proteases in these lung tumors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Therefore, an optical probe activated by cathepsin proteases was selected to detect murine lung tumors in vivo as small as 1 mm in diameter and spatially separated. We generated 3D maps of the fluorescence signal and fused them with anatomical computed tomography images to show a close correlation between fluorescence signal and tumor burden. By serially imaging the same mouse, optical imaging was used to follow tumor progression. This study demonstrates the capability for molecular imaging of a primary lung tumor by using endogenous proteases expressed by a tumor. It also highlights the feasibility of using gene expression profiling to identify molecular targets for imaging lung cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1242291/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4524
      1. Author :
        Kenneth M. Kozloff, Luisa Quinti, Somying Patntirapong, Peter V. Hauschka, Ching-Hsuan Tung, Ralph Weissleder and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; ProSense; OsteoSense; bone; osteoclast; cathepsin K; non-invasive imaging; molecular imaging; fluorescence; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix by demineralization followed by degradation of type I collagen through secretion of the cysteine protease, cathepsin K. Current imaging modalities are insufficient for sensitive observation of osteoclast activity, and in vivo live imaging of osteoclast resorption of bone has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we describe a near-infrared fluorescence reporter probe whose activation by cathepsin K is shown in live osteoclast cells and in mouse models of development and osteoclast upregulation. Cathepsin K probe activity was monitored in live osteoclast cultures and correlates with cathepsin K gene expression. In ovariectomized mice, cathepsin K probe upregulation precedes detection of bone loss by micro-computed tomography. These results are the first to demonstrate non-invasive visualization of bone degrading enzymes in models of accelerated bone loss, and may provide a means for early diagnosis of upregulated resorption and rapid feedback on efficacy of treatment protocols prior to significant loss of bone in the patient.
      13. URL :
        http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00816-8/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4526
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