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      1. Author :
        Vintonenko, N.; Jais, J. P.; Kassis, N.; Abdelkarim, M.; Perret, G. Y.; Lecouvey, M.; Crepin, M.; Di Benedetto, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Pharmacol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        82
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, IVIS, Breast cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Statins and bisphosphonates are two distinct classes of isoprenoid pathway inhibitors targeting downstream enzyme to HMG-CoA reductase (upstream enzyme) and farnesyl-pyrophosphate synthase, respectively. Here, we studied fluvastatin (Fluva) and zoledronate (Zol), representative molecules of each class, respectively. In vivo metastatic potentials of both molecules were assessed. For the first time, we observed a significant reduction in progression of established metastases with Fluva treatment. Treatment with both Zol at 100 mug/kg and Fluva at 15 mg/kg inhibited 80% of the metastasis bioluminescence signal and increased survival of mice. The Zol and Fluva transcriptomic profiles of treated MDA-MB-231 cells revealed analogous patterns of affected genes, but each of them reached with different kinetics. The observable changes in gene expression started after 24 h for Fluva IC(50 72 h) and only after 48 h for Zol IC(50 72 h). To obtain early changes in gene expression of Zol-treated cells, a 3 times higher dose of Zol IC(50 72 h) had to be applied. Combining Fluva and Zol in vivo showed no synergy, but a benefit of several days in survival of mice. This study demonstrated that Zol or Fluva is of potential clinical use for the treatment of established metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22723339
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10509
      1. Author :
        Liang, H.; Ma, S. Y.; Mohammad, K.; Guise, T. A.; Balian, G.; Shen, F. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Spine (Phila Pa 1976)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        36
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        STUDY DESIGN: In vivo experiments to develop a rat spine single metastasis model by using human breast cancer cells. OBJECTIVE: To study the survival and tumorigenesis of the human breast cancer cells after transplantation to vertebral body (VB) by intraosseous injection as a model for therapeutic studies of spine metastatic tumor. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: VBs are the most common bones involved in the metastases of breast cancer. To develop experimental therapeutics requires an appropriate animal model. Moreover, it is also important to establish accurate and sensitive detection methods for the evaluation. METHODS: MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were injected into 3-week-old female athymic rats. The tumorigenesis was assayed with quantitative in vivo bioluminescence (IVIS), microcomputed tomography (micro-CT), quantitative CT (qCT), micro position emission tomography (micro-PET), and histologic studies. RESULTS: A spine single metastasis model of human breast cancer was successfully developed in rats. The IVIS signal intensity from the cancer cells increased after 2 weeks. Signal from the tumor in spine can be detected by micro-PET at day 1. The signal intensity decreased after 1 week and then recovered and continually increased afterwards. Bone destruction was demonstrated in the qCT and micro-CT images. However, both qCT and micro-CT found that the bone density in the cancer cell-injected VB increased before the appearance of osteolysis. The growth of tumor and the reaction of bone in the VB were observed simultaneously by histology. CONCLUSION: A spine single metastasis model was developed by injection of human breast cancer cells into the VB of athymic rats. This is the first report of quantitative evaluation with micro-PET in a spine metastasis model. In addition, the detection of osteogenesis after the introduction of MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo is a novel observation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21422981
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10515
      1. Author :
        Zhuang, H.; Jiang, W.; Zhang, X.; Qiu, F.; Gan, Z.; Cheng, W.; Zhang, J.; Guan, S.; Tang, B.; Huang, Q.; Wu, X.; Huang, X.; Hu, Q.; Lu, M.; Hua, Z. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Mol Med (Berl)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Many cancer cell types are resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis. Here, we examined whether HSP70 suppression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) sensitized non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanisms. We demonstrated that HSP70 suppression by siRNA sensitized NSCLC cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by upregulating the expressions of death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5) through activating NF-kappaB, JNK, and, subsequently, p53, consequently significantly amplifying TRAIL-mediated caspase-8 processing and activity, cytosolic translocation of cytochrome c, and cell death. Consistently, the pro-apoptotic proteins Bad and Bax were upregulated, while the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was downregulated. The luciferase activity of the DR4 promoter was blocked by a NF-kappaB pathway inhibitor BAY11-7082, suggesting that NF-kappaB activation plays an important role in the transcriptional upregulation of DR4. Additionally, HSP70 suppression inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK, AKT, and PKC, thereby downregulating c-FLIP-L. A549 xenografts in mice receiving HSP70 siRNA showed TRAIL-induced cell death and increased DR4/DR5 levels and reduced tumor growth. The combination of psiHSP70 gene therapy with TRAIL also significantly increased the survival benefits induced by TRAIL therapy alone. Interestingly, HSP27 siRNA and TRAIL together could not suppress tumor growth or prolong the survival of tumor-bearing mice significantly, although the combination could efficiently induce the apoptosis of A549 cells in vitro. Our findings suggest that HSP70 suppression or downregulation might be promising to overcome TRAIL resistance in cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22948392
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10526
      1. Author :
        Kosaka, N.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshioka, Y.; Hagiwara, K.; Takeshita, F.; Ochiya, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        287
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Normal epithelial cells regulate the secretion of autocrine and paracrine factors that prevent aberrant growth of neighboring cells, leading to healthy development and normal metabolism. One reason for tumor initiation is considered to be a failure of this homeostatic cell competitive system. Here we identify tumor-suppressive microRNAs (miRNAs) secreted by normal cells as anti-proliferative signal entities. Culture supernatant of normal epithelial prostate PNT-2 cells attenuated proliferation of PC-3M-luc cells, prostate cancer cells. Global analysis of miRNA expression signature revealed that a variety of tumor-suppressive miRNAs are released from PNT-2 cells. Of these miRNAs, secretory miR-143 could induce growth inhibition exclusively in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that secretory tumor-suppressive miRNAs can act as a death signal in a cell competitive process. This study provides a novel insight into a tumor initiation mechanism.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22123823
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10537
      1. Author :
        Wensman, H.; Kamgari, N.; Johansson, A.; Grujic, M.; Calounova, G.; Lundequist, A.; Ronnberg, E.; Pejler, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        LL/2-luc-M38, LL/2-luc, Lewis Lung Carcinoma, IVIS, Animals; Antigens, CD137/genetics/*immunology; Carcinoma, Lewis Lung/genetics/*immunology/metabolism; Gene Expression Profiling; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics/*immunology; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Mast Cells/*immunology/metabolism; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Up-Regulation
      12. Abstract :
        Mast cells (MCs) can have either detrimental or beneficial effects on malignant processes but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by examining the interaction between Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cells and MCs. In vivo, LLC tumors caused a profound accumulation of MCs, suggesting that LLC tumors have the capacity to attract MCs. Indeed, transwell migration assays showed that LLC-conditioned medium had chemotactic activity towards MCs, which was blocked by an antibody towards stem cell factor. In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms operative in tumor-MC interactions, the effect of LLC on the MC gene expression pattern was examined. As judged by gene array analysis, conditioned medium from LLC cells caused significant upregulation of numerous cell surface receptors and a pro-angiogenic Runx2/VEGF/Dusp5 axis in MCs, the latter in line with a role for MCs in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Among the genes showing the highest extent of upregulation was Tnfrsf9, encoding the anti-tumorigenic protein 4-1BB, suggesting that also anti-tumorigenic factors are induced. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that 4-1BB was upregulated in a transient manner, and it was also shown that tumor cells induce 4-1BB in human MCs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LLC-conditioned medium induced 4-1BB also at the protein level. Together, this study provides novel insight into the molecular events associated with MC-tumor interactions and suggests that tumor cells induce both pro- and anti-tumorigenic responses in MCs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22343053
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10546
      1. Author :
        Krespi, Y. P.; Kizhner, V.; Nistico, L.; Hall-Stoodley, L.; Stoodley, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Am J Otolaryngol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Biofilms/drug effects/*radiation effects; Ciprofloxacin/*pharmacology; Culture Media; High-Energy Shock Waves; Humans; *Laser Therapy, Low-Level; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*growth &; development/physiology/*radiation effects; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Reference Values; Sensitivity and Specificity; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to study the efficacy of 2 different lasers in vitro, in disrupting biofilm and killing planktonic pathogenic bacteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Biofilms of a stable bioluminescent of Staphylococcus aureus Xen 31 were grown in a 96-well microtiter plate for 3 days. The study included 7 arms: (a) control; (b) ciprofloxacin (3 mg/L, the established minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]) alone; (c) shock wave (SW) laser alone; (d) near-infrared (NIR) laser alone; (e) SW laser and ciprofloxacin; (f) SW and NIR lasers; (g) SW, NIR lasers, and ciprofloxacin. The results were evaluated with an in vivo imaging system (IVIS) biophotonic system (for live bacteria) and optical density (OD) for total bacteria. RESULTS: Without antibiotics, there was a 43% reduction in OD (P < .05) caused by the combination of SW and NIR suggesting that biofilm had been disrupted. There was an 88% reduction (P < .05) in live biofilm. Ciprofloxacin alone resulted in a decrease of 28% of total live cells (biofilm remaining attached) and 58% of biofilm cells (both P > .05). Ciprofloxacin in combination with SW and SW + NIR lasers caused a decrease of more than 60% in total live biomass and more than 80% of biofilm cells, which was significantly greater than ciprofloxacin alone (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated an effective nonpharmacologic treatment method for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilm disruption and killing using 2 different lasers. The preferred treatment sequence is a SW laser disruption of biofilm followed by NIR laser illumination. Treatment optimization of biofilm is possible with the addition of ciprofloxacin in concentrations consistent with planktonic MIC.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20434806
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10554
      1. Author :
        Griffin, A. J.; Li, L. X.; Voedisch, S.; Pabst, O.; McSorley, S. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Infect Immun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        79
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Cell Separation; Disease Models, Animal; Flow Cytometry; Fluoroquinolones/therapeutic use; Intestine, Small/microbiology; Lymph Nodes/*microbiology; Mesentery/immunology/microbiology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Monocytes/immunology/*microbiology; Recurrence; Salmonella Infections, Animal/immunology/*microbiology/pathology; Salmonella typhi/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Enteric pathogens can cause relapsing infections in a proportion of treated patients, but greater understanding of this phenomenon is hindered by the lack of appropriate animal models. We report here a robust animal model of relapsing primary typhoid that initiates after apparently successful antibiotic treatment of susceptible mice. Four days of enrofloxacin treatment were sufficient to reduce bacterial loads below detectable levels in all major organs, and mice appeared otherwise healthy. However, any interruption of further antibiotic therapy allowed renewed fecal shedding and renewed bacterial growth in systemic tissues to occur, and mice eventually succumbed to relapsing infection. In vivo imaging of luminescent Salmonella identified the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) as a major reservoir of relapsing infection. A magnetic-bead enrichment strategy isolated MLN-resident CD11b(+) Gr-1(-) monocytes associated with low numbers of persistent Salmonella. However, the removal of MLNs increased the severity of typhoid relapse, demonstrating that this organ serves as a protective filter to restrain the dissemination of bacteria during antibiotic therapy. Together, these data describe a robust animal model of typhoid relapse and identify an important intestinal phagocyte subset involved in protection against the systemic spread of enteric infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21263018
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10559
      1. Author :
        Hamrahi, V.; Hamblin, M. R.; Jung, W.; Benjamin, J. B.; Paul, K. W.; Fischman, A. J.; Tompkins, R. G.; Carter, E. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Interdiscip Perspect Infect Dis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2012
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen44, Xen 44, Proteus mirabilis, bioluminescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Sepsis remains the major cause of death in patients with major burn injuries. In the present investigation we evaluated the interaction between burn injuries of varying severity and preexisting distant infection. We used Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis) that were genetically engineered to be bioluminescent, which allowed for noninvasive, sequential optical imaging of the extent and severity of the infection. The bioluminescent bacteria migrated from subcutaneous abscesses in the leg to distant burn wounds on the back depending on the severity of the burn injury, and this migration led to increased mortality of the mice. Treatment with ciprofloxacin, injected either in the leg with the bacterial infection or into the burn eschar, prevented this colonization of the wound and decreased mortality. The present data suggest that burn wounds can readily become colonized by infections distant from the wound itself.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22899912
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10562
      1. Author :
        Yipp, B. G.; Petri, B.; Salina, D.; Jenne, C. N.; Scott, B. N.; Zbytnuik, L. D.; Pittman, K.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Wu, K.; Meijndert, H. C.; Malawista, S. E.; de Boisfleury Chevance, A.; Zhang, K.; Conly, J.; Kubes, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging, Analysis of Variance; Animals; Extracellular Space/*metabolism; Genetic Vectors/genetics; Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Movement/*physiology; Neutrophils/*immunology/metabolism/physiology; Opsonin Proteins/metabolism; Skin Diseases, Bacterial/*immunology/metabolism; Toll-Like Receptor 2/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released as neutrophils die in vitro in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap that invasive microbes may exploit. Neutrophils capable of migration and phagocytosis while undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented systemic bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling, thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMNs developed diffuse decondensed nuclei, ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei showed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A requirement for both Toll-like receptor 2 and complement-mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally, live human PMNs injected into mouse skin developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo, and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection NETosis involves neutrophils that do not undergo lysis and retain the ability to multitask.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22922410
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10565
      1. Author :
        Kwong, G. A.; von Maltzahn, G.; Murugappan, G.; Abudayyeh, O.; Mo, S.; Papayannopoulos, I. A.; Sverdlov, D. Y.; Liu, S. B.; Warren, A. D.; Popov, Y.; Schuppan, D.; Bhatia, S. N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Biotechnol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of complex diseases, yet our ability to discover new biomarkers remains limited by our dependence on endogenous molecules. Here we describe the development of exogenously administered 'synthetic biomarkers' composed of mass-encoded peptides conjugated to nanoparticles that leverage intrinsic features of human disease and physiology for noninvasive urinary monitoring. These protease-sensitive agents perform three functions in vivo: they target sites of disease, sample dysregulated protease activities and emit mass-encoded reporters into host urine for multiplexed detection by mass spectrometry. Using mouse models of liver fibrosis and cancer, we show that these agents can noninvasively monitor liver fibrosis and resolution without the need for invasive core biopsies and substantially improve early detection of cancer compared with current clinically used blood biomarkers. This approach of engineering synthetic biomarkers for multiplexed urinary monitoring should be broadly amenable to additional pathophysiological processes and point-of-care diagnostics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242163
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10567
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