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      1. Author :
        Arima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Sasaki, M.; Hosonaga, M.; Goto, T. M.; Chiyoda, T.; Kuninaka, S.; Shibata, T.; Ohata, H.; Nakagama, H.; Taya, Y.; Saya, H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        We previously showed that depletion of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) induces down-regulation of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin and thereby triggers the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). To further characterize the effect of RB inactivation on the phenotype of cancer cells, we have now examined RB expression in human breast cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. We found that RB-inactive cells exhibit a mesenchymal-like morphology and are highly invasive. We also found that ZEB proteins, transcriptional repressors of the E-cadherin gene, are markedly up-regulated in these cells in a manner sensitive to the miR-200 family of microRNAs. Moreover, depletion of ZEB in RB-inactive cells suppressed cell invasiveness and proliferation as well as induced epithelial marker expression. These results implicate ZEB in induction of the EMT as well as in maintenance of the mesenchymal phenotype in RB-inactive cells. We also developed a screening program for inhibitors of ZEB1 expression and thereby identified several cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors that blocked both ZEB1 expression and RB phosphorylation. Together, our findings suggest that RB inactivation contributes to tumor progression not only through loss of cell cycle control but also through up-regulation of ZEB expression and induction of an invasive phenotype.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22262832
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10418
      1. Author :
        Cao, L.; Kobayakawa, S.; Yoshiki, A.; Abe, K.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Abdomen; Animals; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Liver/cytology; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy/*instrumentation/*methods; Molecular Imaging/*instrumentation/*methods; Pancreas/cytology/ultrastructure; Time-Lapse Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Intravital imaging of brain and bone marrow cells in the skull with subcellular resolution has revolutionized neurobiology, immunology and hematology. However, the application of this powerful technology in studies of abdominal organs has long been impeded by organ motion caused by breathing and heartbeat. Here we describe for the first time a simple device designated 'microstage' that effectively reduces organ motions without causing tissue lesions. Combining this microstage device with an upright intravital laser scanning microscope equipped with a unique stick-type objective lens, the system enables subcellular-level imaging of abdominal organs in live mice. We demonstrate that this technique allows for the quantitative analysis of subcellular structures and gene expressions in cells, the tracking of intracellular processes in real-time as well as three-dimensional image construction in the pancreas and liver of the live mouse. As the aforementioned analyses based on subcellular imaging could be extended to other intraperitoneal organs, the technique should offer great potential for investigation of physiological and disease-specific events of abdominal organs. The microstage approach adds an exciting new technique to the in vivo imaging toolbox.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22479464
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10431
      1. Author :
        Wallis de Vries, B. M.; van Dam, G. M.; Tio, R. A.; Hillebrands, J. L.; Slart, R. H.; Zeebregts, C. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        J Vasc Surg
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MMPSense, IVIS, Atherosclerosis/complications/*diagnosis; Carotid Stenosis/*diagnosis/etiology; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Humans; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that plaque vulnerability, rather than the degree of stenosis, is important in predicting the occurrence of subsequent cerebral ischemic events in patients with carotid artery stenosis. The many imaging modalities currently available have different properties with regard to the visualization of the extent of vulnerability in carotid plaque formation. METHODS: Original published studies were identified using the MEDLINE database (January 1966 to March 2008). Manual cross-referencing was also performed. RESULTS: There is no single imaging modality that can produce definitive information about the state of vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque. Each has its own specific drawbacks, which may be the use of ionizing radiation or nephrotoxic contrast agents, an invasive character, low patient tolerability, or simply the paucity of information obtained on plaque vulnerability. Functional molecular imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) and near infra-red spectroscopy (NIRS) do seem able accurately to visualize and even quantify features of plaque vulnerability and its pathophysiologic processes. Promising new techniques like near infra-red fluorescence imaging are being developed and may be beneficial in this field. CONCLUSION: There is a promising role for functional molecular imaging modalities like PET, SPECT, or NIRS related to improvement of selection criteria for carotid intervention, especially when combined with CT or MRI to add further anatomical details to molecular information. Further information will be needed to define whether and where this functional molecular imaging will fit into a clinical strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18804942
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10464
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10476
      1. Author :
        Zollo, M.; Di Dato, V.; Spano, D.; De Martino, D.; Liguori, L.; Marino, N.; Vastolo, V.; Navas, L.; Garrone, B.; Mangano, G.; Biondi, G.; Guglielmotti, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Clin Exp Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/*pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Chemokine CCL2/*biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism; Female; Humans; Indazoles/*pharmacology; Macrophages/metabolism; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; NF-kappa B/metabolism; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; Propionates/*pharmacology; Prostatic Neoplasms/*pathology; Signal Transduction
      12. Abstract :
        Prostate and breast cancer are major causes of death worldwide, mainly due to patient relapse upon disease recurrence through formation of metastases. Chemokines are small proteins with crucial roles in the immune system, and their regulation is finely tuned in early inflammatory responses. They are key molecules during inflammatory processes, and many studies are focusing on their regulatory functions in tumor growth and angiogenesis during metastatic cell seeding and spreading. Bindarit is an anti-inflammatory indazolic derivative that can inhibit the synthesis of MCP-1/CCL2, with a potential inhibitory function in tumor progression and metastasis formation. We show here that in vitro, bindarit can modulate cancer-cell proliferation and migration, mainly through negative regulation of TGF-beta and AKT signaling, and it can impair the NF-kappaB signaling pathway through enhancing the expression of the NF-kappaB inhibitor IkB-alpha. In vivo administration of bindarit results in impaired metastatic disease in prostate cancer xenograft mice (PC-3M-Luc2 cells injected intra-cardially) and impairment of local tumorigenesis in syngeneic Balb/c mice injected under the mammary gland with murine breast cancer cells (4T1-Luc cells). In addition, bindarit treatment significantly decreases the infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in 4T1-Luc primary tumors. Overall, our data indicate that bindarit is a good candidate for new therapies against prostate and breast tumorigenesis, with an action through impairment of inflammatory cell responses during formation of the tumor-stroma niche microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22484917
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10489
      1. Author :
        Weljie, A. M.; Bondareva, A.; Zang, P.; Jirik, F. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Biomol NMR
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Hypoxia can promote invasive behavior in cancer cells and alters the response to therapeutic intervention as a result of changes in the expression many genes, including genes involved in intermediary metabolism. Although metabolomics technologies are capable of simultaneously measuring a wide range of metabolites in an untargeted manner, these methods have been relatively under utilized in the study of cancer cell responses to hypoxia. Thus, (1)H NMR metabolomics was used to examine the effects of hypoxia in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line, both in vitro and in vivo. Cell cultures were compared with respect to their metabolic responses during growth under either hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic conditions. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify a set of metabolites that were responsive to hypoxia. Via intracardiac administration, MDA-MB-231 cells were also used to generate widespread metastatic disease in immuno-compromised mice. Serum metabolite analysis was conducted to compare animals with and without a large tumor burden. Intriguingly, using a cross-plot of the OPLS loadings, both the in vitro and in vivo samples yielded a subset of metabolites that were significantly altered by hypoxia. These included primarily energy metabolites and amino acids, indicative of known alterations in energy metabolism, and possibly protein synthesis or catabolism. The results suggest that the metabolite pattern identified might prove useful as a marker for intra-tumoral hypoxia.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21373841
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10494
      1. Author :
        Akudugu, J. M.; Azzam, E. I.; Howell, R. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Radiat Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        88
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Abstract Purpose: This study uses a three-dimensional cell culture model to investigate lethal bystander effects in human breast cancer cell cultures (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) treated with (125)I-labeled 5-iodo-2 -deoxyuridine ((125)IdU). These breast cancer cell lines respectively form metastatic xenografts in nude mice in an estrogen-dependent and independent manner. Materials and methods: In the present study, these cells were cultured in loosely-packed three-dimensional architecture in a Cytomatrix carbon scaffold. Cultures were pulse-labeled for 3 h with (125)IdU to selectively irradiate a minor fraction of cells, and simultaneously co-pulse-labeled with 0.04 mM 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) to identify the radiolabeled cells using Click-iT((R)) EdU and flow cytometry. The cultures were then washed and incubated for 48 h. The cells were then harvested, serially diluted, and seeded for colony formation. Aliquots of cells were subjected to flow cytometry to determine the percentage of cells labeled with (125)IdU/EdU. Additional aliquots were used to determine the mean (125)I activity per labeled cell. The percentage of labeled cells was about 15% and 10% for MCF-7 and MDA cells, respectively. This created irradiation conditions wherein the cross-dose to unlabeled cells was small relative to the self-dose to labeled cells. The surviving fraction relative to EdU-treated controls was measured. Results: Survival curves indicated significant lethal bystander effect in MCF-7 cells, however, no significant lethal bystander effect was observed in MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusions: These studies demonstrate the capacity of (125)IdU to induce lethal bystander effects in human breast cancer cells and suggest that the response depends on phenotype.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22489958
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10514
      1. Author :
        Wang, S.; Noberini, R.; Stebbins, J. L.; Das, S.; Zhang, Z.; Wu, B.; Mitra, S.; Billet, S.; Fernandez, A.; Bhowmick, N. A.; Kitada, S.; Pasquale, E. B.; Fisher, P. B.; Pellecchia, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Clin Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: YSA is an EphA2-targeting peptide that effectively delivers anticancer agents to prostate cancer tumors. Here, we report on how we increased the drug-like properties of this delivery system. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: By introducing non-natural amino acids, we have designed two new EphA2 targeting peptides: YNH, where norleucine and homoserine replace the two methionine residues of YSA, and dYNH, where a D-tyrosine replaces the L-tyrosine at the first position of the YNH peptide. We describe the details of the synthesis of YNH and dYNH paclitaxel conjugates (YNH-PTX and dYNH-PTX) and their characterization in cells and in vivo. RESULTS: dYNH-PTX showed improved stability in mouse serum and significantly reduced tumor size in a prostate cancer xenograft model and also reduced tumor vasculature in a syngeneic orthotopic allograft mouse model of renal cancer compared with vehicle or paclitaxel treatments. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that targeting EphA2 with dYNH drug conjugates could represent an effective way to deliver anticancer agents to a variety of tumor types. Clin Cancer Res; 19(1); 128-37. (c)2012 AACR.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23155185
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10541
      1. Author :
        Leszczynska, K.; Namiot, D.; Byfield, F. J.; Cruz, K.; Zendzian-Piotrowska, M.; Fein, D. E.; Savage, P. B.; Diamond, S.; McCulloch, C. A.; Janmey, P. A.; Bucki, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Antimicrob Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: We aim to develop antibacterial peptide mimics resistant to protease degradation, with broad-spectrum activity at sites of infection. METHODS: The bactericidal activities of LL-37, ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-90 and CSA-92 and the spermine-conjugated dexamethasone derivative D2S were evaluated using MIC and MBC measurements. Gingival fibroblast counting, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from keratinocytes (HaCat) were used to determine effects on cell growth, pro-inflammatory response and toxicity. RESULTS: All tested cationic lipids showed stronger bactericidal activity than LL-37. Incubation of Staphylococcus aureus with half the MIC of LL-37 led to the appearance of bacteria resistant to its bactericidal effects, but identical incubations with CSA-13 or D2S did not produce resistant bacteria. Cathelicidin LL-37 significantly increased the total number of gingival fibroblasts, but ceragenins and D2S did not alter gingival fibroblast growth. Cationic lipids showed no toxicity to HaCat cells at concentrations resulting in bacterial killing. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that cationic lipids such as ceragenins warrant further testing as potential novel antibacterial agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23134677
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10551
      1. Author :
        Tanaka, M.; Mroz, P.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Morimoto, Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Yoshihara, Y.; Shinomiya, N.; Seki, S.; Nemoto, K.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Photochem Photobiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        We previously reported that photodynamic therapy (PDT) using intra-articular methylene blue (MB) could be used to treat arthritis in mice caused by bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) either in a therapeutic or in a preventative mode. PDT accumulated neutrophils into the mouse knee via activation of chemoattractants such as inflammatory cytokines or chemokines. In the present study, we asked whether PDT combined with antibiotics used for MRSA could provide added benefit in controlling the infection. We compared MB-PDT alone, systemic administration of either linezolid (LZD) alone or vancomycin (VCM) alone or the combination of PDT with either LZD or VCM. Real-time non-invasive imaging was used to serially follow the progress of the infection. PDT alone was the most effective, while LZD alone was ineffective and VCM alone showed some benefit. Surprisingly the addition of LZD or VCM reduced the therapeutic effect of PDT alone (P<0.05). Considering that PDT in this mouse model stimulates neutrophils to be antibacterial rather than actively killing the bacteria, we propose that LZD and VCM might inhibit the activation of inflammatory cytokines without eradicating the bacteria, and thereby reduce the therapeutic effect of PDT. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology (c) 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23311407
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10558
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