1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

121–130 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Lasers in surgery and medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        39
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Infective Agents; Biofilms; Dental Pulp Cavity; Dental Pulp Diseases; Endodontics; Humans; Luminescence; Photochemotherapy; Polyethyleneimine; Porphyrins; Proteus Infections; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Pseudomonas Infections; Xen5; Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE To compare the effectiveness of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT), standard endodontic treatment and the combined treatment to eliminate bacterial biofilms present in infected root canals. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten single-rooted freshly extracted human teeth were inoculated with stable bioluminescent Gram-negative bacteria, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to form 3-day biofilms in prepared root canals. Bioluminescence imaging was used to serially quantify bacterial burdens. PDT employed a conjugate between polyethylenimine and chlorin(e6) as the photosensitizer (PS) and 660-nm diode laser light delivered into the root canal via a 200-micro fiber, and this was compared and combined with standard endodontic treatment using mechanical debridement and antiseptic irrigation. RESULTS Endodontic therapy alone reduced bacterial bioluminescence by 90% while PDT alone reduced bioluminescence by 95%. The combination reduced bioluminescence by >98%, and importantly the bacterial regrowth observed 24 hours after treatment was much less for the combination (P<0.0005) than for either single treatment. CONCLUSIONS Bioluminescence imaging is an efficient way to monitor endodontic therapy. Antimicrobial PDT may have a role to play in optimized endodontic therapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17066481
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9997
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Brazilian dental journal
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Colony Count, Microbial; Cuspid; Dental Pulp Cavity; Disinfectants; Drug Combinations; Genetic Engineering; Humans; Hydrogen peroxide; Incisor; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Maxilla; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Root Canal Irrigants; Root Canal Preparation; Sensitivity and Specificity; Sodium Hypochlorite; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Microbial infection plays an important role in the development of pulp necrosis and formation of periapical lesions. In vitro and in vivo research in this field, traditionally microbiological culture methods using paper point sampling and quantitative culture, faces difficulties in completely removing bacteria from the root canal system and analyzing sequential procedures. This study employed genetically engineered bioluminescent bacteria and a light-sensitive imaging system to allow real-time visualization of the infection. Ten extracted teeth incubated with P. aeruginosa were treated by mechanical instrumentation with K-files (#30 K-file, #35 K-file and #40 K-file) and chemical irrigation with sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide. Irrigation alone reduced the contamination in 18%; the first chemomechanical sequence (instrumentation with a #30 K-file + irrigation) provided 41% of reduction; the second sequence (#35 K-file + irrigation) achieved 62%; and the complete therapy (#30 K-file + #35 K-file + #40 K-file + irrigation) achieved 93% of bacterial reduction. These results suggest that the endodontic treatment is dependent on the association of a chemical and mechanical approaches and that root canal enlargement improves bacterial reduction probably because the irrigation has more access to the apical third.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18176710
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9998
      1. Author :
        Georgel, P.; Radosavljevic, M.; Macquin, C.; Bahram, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics/*immunology; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/*immunology/prevention & control; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*immunology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout
      12. Abstract :
        As opposed to the well established role of MHC-linked, polymorphic, class I (MHC-I) genes in adaptive immunity, a universal role for non-conventional MHC-I is unknown, thus requiring a case-by-case study. The MHC unlinked, monomorphic, but beta(2)microglobulin (beta(2)m)-associated “MHC class I related” MR1 molecule interacts with a semi-invariant TCR. The pathophysiology of this interaction or more importantly of this peculiar MHC-I remains mostly unknown. Recently it was shown that beta(2)m deficient mice were more susceptible to infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae, a widely spread Gram-negative bacteria that causes diverse and often severe ailments in man. Here we demonstrate, using both an in vivo imaging system and survival tests, the increased susceptibility to K. pneumoniae (but not to several other Gram negative bacteria) of MR1 deficient mice. This is accompanied by a consequent change in body temperature and systemic cytokine profile. Hence MR1 controls K. pneumoniae infection in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21190736
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10392
      1. Author :
        Georgel, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Lauth, Xavier; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Seltmann, Holger; Sovath, Sosathya; Hoebe, Kasper; Du, Xin; Rutschmann, Sophie; Jiang, Zhengfan; Bigby, Timothy; Nizet, Victor; Zouboulis, Christos C; Beutler, Bruce
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Chromosome Mapping; Eye Diseases; Fatty Acids, Monounsaturated; Likelihood Functions; Lod Score; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Oleic Acid; Receptors, Immunologic; Sequence Analysis, DNA; Skin; Staphylococcal Skin Infections; Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase; Streptococcus pyogenes; Time Factors; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Xen8.1, Xen20, Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        flake (flk), an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced recessive germ line mutation of C57BL/6 mice, impairs the clearance of skin infections by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive pathogens that elicit innate immune responses by activating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Positional cloning and sequencing revealed that flk is a novel allele of the stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 gene (Scd1). flake homozygotes show reduced sebum production and are unable to synthesize the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) palmitoleate (C(16:1)) and oleate (C(18:1)), both of which are bactericidal against gram-positive (but not gram-negative) organisms in vitro. However, intradermal MUFA administration to S. aureus-infected mice partially rescues the flake phenotype, which indicates that an additional component of the sebum may be required to improve bacterial clearance. In normal mice, transcription of Scd1-a gene with numerous NF-kappaB elements in its promoter--is strongly and specifically induced by TLR2 signaling. Similarly, the SCD1 gene is induced by TLR2 signaling in a human sebocyte cell line. These observations reveal the existence of a regulated, lipid-based antimicrobial effector pathway in mammals and suggest new approaches to the treatment or prevention of infections with gram-positive bacteria.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16040962
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9990
      1. Author :
        Ghali, Shadi; Bhatt, Kirit A; Dempsey, Marlese P; Jones, Deidre M; Singh, Sunil; Aarabi, Shahram; Arabi, Shahram; Butler, Peter E; Gallo, Robert L; Gurtner, Geoffrey C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Plastic and reconstructive surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        123
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; Bioware; Cathelicidins; Chronic Disease; Drug Carriers; Genetic Engineering; Male; Rats; Rats, Inbred F344; Surgical Flaps; Wound Infection; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND The success of antimicrobial therapy has been impaired by the emergence of resistant bacterial strains. Antimicrobial peptides are ubiquitous proteins that are part of the innate immune system and are successful against such antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. The authors have previously demonstrated the feasibility of protein delivery via microvascular free flap gene therapy and here they examine this approach for recalcitrant infections. METHODS The authors investigated the production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide-LL37, delivered by ex vivo transduction of the rodent superficial inferior epigastric free flap with Ad/CMV-LL37. The vascular permeabilizing agent vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was co-administered during ex vivo transduction with adenoviral vectors in an attempt to augment transduction efficiency. A rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infection seeded with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus was used to assess the biological efficacy of delivering therapeutic antimicrobial genes using this technology. RESULTS The authors were successful in demonstrating significant LL37 expression, which persisted for 14 days after ex vivo transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37. Transduction efficiency was significantly improved with the co-administration of 5 micrograms of VEGF during transduction without significantly increasing systemic dissemination of adenovirus or systemic toxicity. They were able to demonstrate in the rodent model of chronic wound/foreign body infections a significant reduction in bacterial loads from infected catheters following transduction with Ad/CMV-LL37 and increased bacterial clearance. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates for the first time that microbicidal gene therapy via microvascular free flaps is able to clear chronic infections such as occurs with osteomyelitis resulting from trauma or an infected foreign body [corrected]
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19337084
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9040
      1. Author :
        Gillrie, Mark R; Zbytnuik, Lori; McAvoy, Erin; Kapadia, Roxna; Lee, Kristine; Waterhouse, Christopher C M; Davis, Shevaun P; Muruve, Daniel A; Kubes, Paul; Ho, May
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European journal of immunology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        40
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chemotaxis, Leukocyte; Endothelial Cells; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Humans; Interferon-gamma; Lipopolysaccharides; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Teichoic Acids; Toll-Like Receptor 2; Transplantation Chimera; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The response of leukocytes to lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a TLR2-dependent major cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus, is linked to the outcome of an infection. In this study we investigated the role of nonhematopoietic TLR2 in response to LTA and S. aureus by creating bone marrow chimeras. Significant leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA required IFN-gamma priming in WT C57BL/6 and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice, but was not observed in TLR2(-/-) or WT-->TLR2(-/-) animals. LTA also induced a proinflammatory response in IFN-gamma primed primary human microvascular endothelial cells leading to leukocyte recruitment in vitro. When mice were infected with S. aureus, the most profound elevation of TNF-alpha and IL-6 was seen in TLR2(-/-) and TLR2(-/-)-->WT mice. TLR2(-/-), but not chimeric mice, demonstrated increased IL-17, blood leukocytosis and pulmonary neutrophilia compared to WT mice. Collectively, the results suggest an essential role for IFN-gamma and nonhematopoietic TLR2 for leukocyte recruitment in response to LTA. In contrast, TLR2 on both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells appears to orchestrate an inhibitory response to S. aureus such that in complete TLR2 deficiency, there is an exaggerated proinflammatory response and/or skewing of the immune response towards a Th17 phenotype that may contribute to the decreased survival of TLR2(-/-) mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20306471
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9036
      1. Author :
        Giubellino, Alessio; Gao, Yang; Lee, Sunmin; Lee, Min-Jung; Vasselli, James R; Medepalli, Sampath; Trepel, Jane B; Burke, Terrence R, Jr; Bottaro, Donald P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        13
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; GRB2 Adaptor Protein; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Transplantation; PC-3M-luc; Protein Binding; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Tetrazolium Salts; Thiazoles
      12. Abstract :
        Metastasis, the primary cause of death in most forms of cancer, is a multistep process whereby cells from the primary tumor spread systemically and colonize distant new sites. Blocking critical steps in this process could potentially inhibit tumor metastasis and dramatically improve cancer survival rates; however, our understanding of metastasis at the molecular level is still rudimentary. Growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2) is a widely expressed adapter protein with roles in epithelial cell growth and morphogenesis, as well as angiogenesis, making it a logical target for anticancer drug development. We have previously shown that a potent antagonist of Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-binding, C90, blocks growth factor-driven cell motility in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. We now report that C90 inhibits metastasis in vivo in two aggressive tumor models, without affecting primary tumor growth rate. These results support the potential efficacy of this compound in reducing the metastatic spread of primary solid tumors and establish a critical role for Grb2 Src homology-2 domain-mediated interactions in this process.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17616655
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8969
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS pathogens
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anthrax; Bacillus anthracis; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Inhalation Exposure; Luciferases; Luminescence; Luminescent Measurements; Lymph Nodes; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Cavity; Organisms, Genetically Modified; Peyer's Patches; Pharynx; pXen-5; Skin; Spores, Bacterial
      12. Abstract :
        Bacillus anthracis causes three forms of anthrax: inhalational, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous. Anthrax is characterized by both toxemia, which is caused by secretion of immunomodulating toxins (lethal toxin and edema toxin), and septicemia, which is associated with bacterial encapsulation. Here we report that, contrary to the current view of B. anthracis pathogenesis, B. anthracis spores germinate and establish infections at the initial site of inoculation in both inhalational and cutaneous infections without needing to be transported to draining lymph nodes, and that inhaled spores establish initial infection in nasal-associated lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, we found that Peyer's patches in the mouse intestine are the primary site of bacterial growth after intragastric inoculation, thus establishing an animal model of gastrointestinal anthrax. All routes of infection progressed to the draining lymph nodes, spleen, lungs, and ultimately the blood. These discoveries were made possible through the development of a novel dynamic mouse model of B. anthracis infection using bioluminescent non-toxinogenic capsulated bacteria that can be visualized within the mouse in real-time, and demonstrate the value of in vivo imaging in the analysis of B. anthracis infection. Our data imply that previously unrecognized portals of bacterial entry demand more intensive investigation, and will significantly transform the current perception of inhalational, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous B. anthracis pathogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17542645
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9022
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All