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      1. Author :
        Filip K. Swirski, Matthias Nahrendorf, Martin Etzrodt, Moritz Wildgruber, Virna Cortez-Retamozo, Peter Panizzi, Jose-Luiz Figueiredo, Rainer H. Kohler, Aleksey Chudnovskiy, Peter Waterman, Elena Aikawa, Thorsten R. Mempel, Peter Libby, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Science
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        325
      8. Issue :
        5940
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research; Immunology
      11. Keywords :
        splenic monocytes; in vivo imaging; ProSense; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        A current paradigm states that monocytes circulate freely and patrol blood vessels but differentiate irreversibly into dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages upon tissue entry. Here we show that bona fide undifferentiated monocytes reside in the spleen and outnumber their equivalents in circulation. The reservoir monocytes assemble in clusters in the cords of the subcapsular red pulp and are distinct from macrophages and DCs. In response to ischemic myocardial injury, splenic monocytes increase their motility, exit the spleen en masse, accumulate in injured tissue, and participate in wound healing. These observations uncover a role for the spleen as a site for storage and rapid deployment of monocytes and identify splenic monocytes as a resource that the body exploits to regulate inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.sciencemag.org/content/325/5940/612.abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4567
      1. Author :
        Filip K. Swirski, Ralph Weissleder and Mikael J. Pittet
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        N/A
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        atherosclerosis; in vivo imaging; monocytes; VivoTag; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        Monocytes and macrophages play active roles in atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease that is a leading cause of death in the developed world. The prevailing paradigm states that, during human atherogenesis, monocytes accumulate in the arterial intima and differentiate into macrophages, which then ingest oxidized lipoproteins, secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory mediators, and eventually become foam cells, the key constituents of a vulnerable plaque. Yet monocytes are heterogeneous. In the mouse, one subset (Ly-6Chi) promotes inflammation, expands in hypercholesterolemic conditions, and selectively gives rise to macrophages in atheromata. A different subset (Ly-6Clo) attenuates inflammation and promotes angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in models of tissue injury, but its role in atherosclerosis is largely unknown. In the human, monocyte heterogeneity is preserved but it is still unresolved how subsets correspond functionally. The contradistinctive properties of these cells suggest commitment for specific function before infiltrating tissue. Such commitment argues for discriminate targeting of deleterious subsets while sparing host defense and repair mechanisms. In addition to advancing our understanding of atherosclerosis, the ability to target and image monocyte subsets would allow us to evaluate drugs designed to selectively inhibit monocyte subset recruitment or function, and to stratify patients at risk for developing complications such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this review we summarize recent advances of our understanding of the behavioral heterogeneity of monocytes during disease progression and outline emerging molecular imaging approaches to address key questions in the field.
      13. URL :
        http://atvb.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/ATVBAHA.108.180521v1
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4569
      1. Author :
        Fink, D.; Romanowski, K.; Valuckaite, V.; Babrowski, T.; Kim, M.; Matthews, J. B.; Liu, D.; Zaborina, O.; Alverdy, J. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Trauma
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        71
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        1575-82
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen41, Xen 41, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen41, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: : Experimental models of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR) injury are invariably performed in mice harboring their normal commensal flora, even though multiple IIR events occur in humans during prolonged intensive care confinement when they are colonized by a highly pathogenic hospital flora. The aims of this study were to determine whether the presence of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the distal intestine potentiates the lethality of mice exposed to IIR and to determine what role any in vivo virulence activation plays in the observed mortality. METHODS: : Seven- to 9-week-old C57/BL6 mice were exposed to 15 minutes of superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) followed by direct intestinal inoculation of 1.0 x 10 colony-forming unit of P. aeruginosa PAO1 into the ileum and observed for mortality. Reiterative studies were performed in separate groups of mice to evaluate both the migration/dissemination pattern and in vivo virulence activation of intestinally inoculated strains using live photon camera imaging of both a constitutive bioluminescent P. aeruginosa PAO1 derivative XEN41 and an inducible reporter derivative of PAO1, the PAO1/lecA:luxCDABE that conditionally expresses the quorum sensing-dependent epithelial disrupting virulence protein PA 1 Lectin (PA-IL). RESULTS: : Mice exposed to 15 minutes of SMAO and reperfusion with intestinal inoculation of P. aeruginosa had a significantly increased mortality rate (p < 0.001) of 100% compared with <10% for sham-operated mice intestinally inoculated with P. aeruginosa without SMAO and IIR alone (<50%). Migration/dissemination patterns of P. aeruginosa in mice subjected to IIR demonstrated proximal migration of distally injected strains and translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney. A key role for in vivo virulence expression of the barrier disrupting adhesin PA-IL during IIR was established since its expression was enhanced during IR and mutant strains lacking PA-IL displayed attenuated mortality. CONCLUSIONS: : The presence of intestinal P. aeruginosa potentiates the lethal effect of IIR in mice in part due to in vivo virulence activation of its epithelial barrier disrupting protein PA-IL.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22002612
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10423
      1. Author :
        Fogal, Valentina; Richardson, Adam D; Karmali, Priya P; Scheffler, Immo E; Smith, Jeffrey W; Ruoslahti, Erkki
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular and cellular biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        30
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Carbon; Carrier Proteins; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Electron Transport Complex I; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Humans; Mass Spectrometry; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mitochondria; Mitochondrial Proteins; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Oxidative Phosphorylation; Protein Biosynthesis; Protein Stability; Rotenone
      12. Abstract :
        p32/gC1qR/C1QBP/HABP1 is a mitochondrial/cell surface protein overexpressed in certain cancer cells. Here we show that knocking down p32 expression in human cancer cells strongly shifts their metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to glycolysis. The p32 knockdown cells exhibited reduced synthesis of the mitochondrial-DNA-encoded OXPHOS polypeptides and were less tumorigenic in vivo. Expression of exogenous p32 in the knockdown cells restored the wild-type cellular phenotype and tumorigenicity. Increased glucose consumption and lactate production, known as the Warburg effect, are almost universal hallmarks of solid tumors and are thought to favor tumor growth. However, here we show that a protein regularly overexpressed in some cancers is capable of promoting OXPHOS. Our results indicate that high levels of glycolysis, in the absence of adequate OXPHOS, may not be as beneficial for tumor growth as generally thought and suggest that tumor cells use p32 to regulate the balance between OXPHOS and glycolysis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20100866
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8952
      1. Author :
        Francis, K P; Yu, J; Bellinger-Kawahara, C; Joh, D; Hawkinson, M J; Xiao, G; Purchio, T F; Caparon, M G; Lipsitch, M; Contag, P R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2001
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amoxicillin; Animals; Bioware; DNA Transposable Elements; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Lung; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasopharynx; Operon; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-5; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Transformation, Bacterial, Xen10, Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        Animal studies with Streptococcus pneumoniae have provided valuable models for drug development. In order to monitor long-term pneumococcal infections noninvasively in living mice, a novel gram-positive lux transposon cassette, Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), that allows random integration of lux genes onto the bacterial chromosome was constructed. The cassette was designed so that the luxABCDE and kanamycin resistance genes were linked to form a single promoterless operon. Bioluminescence and kanamycin resistance only occur in a bacterial cell if this operon has transposed downstream of a promoter on the bacterium's chromosome. S. pneumoniae D39 was transformed with plasmid pAUL-A Tn4001 luxABCDE Km(r), and a number of highly bioluminescent colonies were recovered. Genomic DNA from the brightest D39 strain was used to transform a number of clinical S. pneumoniae isolates, and several of these strains were tested in animal models, including a pneumococcal lung infection model. Strong bioluminescent signals were seen in the lungs of the animals containing these pneumococci, allowing the course and antibiotic treatment of the infections to be readily monitored in real time in the living animals. Recovery of the bacteria from the animals showed that the bioluminescent signal corresponded to the number of CFU and that the lux construct was highly stable even after several days in vivo. We believe that this lux transposon will greatly expand the ability to evaluate drug efficacy against gram-positive bacteria in living animals using bioluminescence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11292758
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9027
      1. Author :
        Fu, A.; Wilson, R. J.; Smith, B. R.; Mullenix, J.; Earhart, C.; Akin, D.; Guccione, S.; Wang, S. X.; Gambhir, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        ACS Nano
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Fluorescent Dyes/*chemistry/*diagnostic use; Glioblastoma/*pathology; Humans; Magnetic Fields; Magnetite Nanoparticles/*diagnostic use; Materials Testing; Mice; Mice, SCID; Microscopy, Fluorescence/*methods; Nanocapsules/*chemistry/ultrastructure; Particle Size
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection and targeted therapy are two major challenges in the battle against cancer. Novel imaging contrast agents and targeting approaches are greatly needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of cancer theranostic agents. Here, we implemented a novel approach using a magnetic micromesh and biocompatible fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMN) to magnetically enhance cancer targeting in living subjects. This approach enables magnetic targeting of systemically administered individual FMN, containing a single 8 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide core. Using a human glioblastoma mouse model, we show that nanoparticles can be magnetically retained in both the tumor neovasculature and surrounding tumor tissues. Magnetic accumulation of nanoparticles within the neovasculature was observable by fluorescence intravital microscopy in real time. Finally, we demonstrate that such magnetically enhanced cancer targeting augments the biological functions of molecules linked to the nanoparticle surface.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22857784
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10434
      1. Author :
        Fu, J. Y.; Zhang, W.; Blatchford, D. R.; Tetley, L.; McConnell, G.; Dufes, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Control Release
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        The therapeutic potential of tocotrienol, a vitamin E extract with anti-cancer properties, is hampered by its failure to specifically reach tumors after intravenous administration. In this work, we demonstrated that novel transferrin-bearing, tocopheryl-based multilamellar vesicles entrapping tocotrienol significantly improved tocotrienol uptake by cancer cells overexpressing transferrin receptors. This led to a dramatically improved therapeutic efficacy in vitro, ranging from 17-fold to 72-fold improvement depending on the cell lines, compared to the free drug. In vivo, the intravenous administration of this novel tocotrienol formulation led to complete tumor eradication for 40% of B16-F10 murine melanoma tumors and 20% of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma tumors. Animal survival was improved by more than 20days compared to controls, for the two tumor models tested. These therapeutic effects, together with the lack of toxicity, potentially make transferrin-bearing vesicles entrapping tocotrienol a highly promising therapeutic system as part as an anti-cancer therapeutic strategy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21539872
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10356
      1. Author :
        G. Blum
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Current Opinion in Drug Discovery Development
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Biology; Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Proteases; pathology; biological markers; fluorescence imaging reagents; in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Proteases play pivotal roles in the normal function of cells. In addition, the expression and activity of proteases are significantly upregulated in several pathologies, including cancer, arthritis and atherosclerosis, and hence they can be considered to be biological markers for these pathologies. The hydrolyzing activity of proteases has been used to generate a variety of fluorescent imaging reagents, the design and utility of which are reviewed here. The use of imaging reagents to visualize protease activity allows for improved detection of various pathologies as well as the ability to monitor the efficacy of therapies in vivo and provide molecular information regarding the nature of the pathology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18729022
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4475
      1. Author :
        Galina Gabriely, Thomas Wurdinger, Santosh Kesari, Christine C. Esau, Julja Burchard, Peter S. Linsley and Anna M. Krichevsky
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Molecular and Cellular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Neuroscience
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; MMPSense; microRNA 21; glioma
      12. Abstract :
        Substantial data indicate that microRNA 21 (miR-21) is significantly elevated in glioblastoma (GBM) and in many other tumors of various origins. This microRNA has been implicated in various aspects of carcinogenesis, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. We demonstrate that miR-21 regulates multiple genes associated with glioma cell apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness, including the RECK and TIMP3 genes, which are suppressors of malignancy and inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Specific inhibition of miR-21 with antisense oligonucleotides leads to elevated levels of RECK and TIMP3 and therefore reduces MMP activities in vitro and in a human model of gliomas in nude mice. Moreover, downregulation of miR-21 in glioma cells leads to decreases of their migratory and invasion abilities. Our data suggest that miR-21 contributes to glioma malignancy by downregulation of MMP inhibitors, which leads to activation of MMPs, thus promoting invasiveness of cancer cells. Our results also indicate that inhibition of a single oncomir, like miR-21, with specific antisense molecules can provide a novel therapeutic approach for “physiological” modulation of multiple proteins whose expression is deregulated in cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://mcb.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/28/17/5369
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4546